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Elohim ambiguity

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  • Roger Anderton
    Elohim ambiguity Ian Lawton: One of the simplest and most poignant examples of editing for political and religious purposes, which came as a great surprise to
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 6, 2003
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      Elohim ambiguity

      Ian Lawton:

      "One of the simplest and most poignant examples of editing for political and religious purposes, which came as a great surprise to me when I learned of it many years ago, is that there are two separate Hebrew words translated as 'God' in English translations of the Old Testament: one is Yahweh, a singular proper name, the other is Elohim, a plural collective term. These two words, broadly speaking, derive from two separate sources known as Yahwist and the Eohist texts. In sensible translation the latter word would have to be rendered as gods - plural. This, of course, would tend to contradict the entrenched monotheism of Christianity; so the simple removal of the s at the end is one of the finest examples of expedient editing of older texts that we have."

      However, Graham Philips translates 'Elohim' differently:

      "In the biblical account, when Moses first asks God to reveal his name at the burning bush he is told, 'I am who I am' (Exodus 3:14). He was simply God - the only God. The Hebrew word for 'god' was El. This had various forms such as Eloyn, 'god most high,' and Elohim, 'your god,' or El Shaddai, 'god Almighty.' The word Yahweh, 'the Lord,' is often used as in Yahweh - tsidkenu, the 'Lord of hosts.'"



      Elohim = 'gods' or 'your god' ??

      Who is right Lawton or Philips?



      reference:



      p 16 - 17 Ian Lawton, Genesis Unveiled

      p 115 Graham Philips, The Moses Legacy





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