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Perpetual Motion Conspiracy #2

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  • Roger Anderton
    Perpetual Motion Conspiracy: Inventors side Despite what was said in previous e-mail - Robert Parks in his book Voodoo Science gives an example of a Perpetual
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 31, 2002
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      Perpetual Motion Conspiracy: Inventors side

      Despite what was said in previous e-mail - Robert Parks in his book Voodoo Science gives an example of a Perpetual motion Inventor case that gets resolved.

      In America 1917 Garabed Giragosian, a man with no scientific training, announced that he had produced a machine that produces more energy than it took to run.

      Giragosian's attempts to get a patent led to his day before the US Senate. Despite Physicists claiming his machine would not work because it violated the Laws of Thermodynamics/Physics, a presidential commission was set up to look at Giragosian's machine.

      In an arranged demonstration - a huge flywheel was started up by being turned by a muscular assistant, and thereafter was driven by a small electric motor. Parks continues:

      "The distinguished commission watched as the flywheel slowly came up to its maximum speed. Then, using a dynamometer, Giragosian measured the energy required to bring the flywheel to a stop. The result, a beaming Giragosian proudly announced, was two hundred times as much energy as the electric motor supplied."

      "There was a shocked silence. They had been assembled for this? Giragosian had confused power and energy. He simply had not understood that energy, supplied by the muscles of his assistant and the electric motor, was being stored in the flywheel as it was brought up to speed over a period of minutes. When he abruptly brought the flywheel to a stop, all of the stored energy was expended in an instant."

      "The entire nation seemed embarrassed by the episode. There was no question of fraud; Giragosian was clearly sincere."

      The case was then closed.

      If Inventors don't have a very good grasp of physics, then they can't be explaining their inventions properly. In the case of Giragosian, he was erroneously claiming an electrical motor that gave 'free energy'. He did not have his description set within a proper understanding and terminology of Physics, because he was not educated in physics. If he claimed a device that was better than existing similar devices then he might have had more chance of being correct. It makes one wonder how many more cases there are like this - inventors not describing their inventions properly. Given the scientists in the Patent Office not understanding physics properly either, then there must be complete breakdown in communication between these two parties when they come into contact.

      This sort of Communication Breakdown must also happen between different parties in the same manner when they set about discussing UFOs.













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