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You Never Want To Cross An Elf

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  • Light Eye
    Dear Friends, Click the link if you can t proceed to page 2. http://fatemag.com/issues/2000s/2006-05article1a.html Love and Light. David You Never Want to
    Message 1 of 2 , May 2, 2006
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      Dear Friends,

      Click the link if you can't proceed to page 2.

      http://fatemag.com/issues/2000s/2006-05article1a.html

      Love and Light.

      David

      You Never Want to Cross an Elf
      By Brad Steiger
      FATE :: May 2006
      For many people today, the image of an elf is firmly established in the characters of either the handsome Legolas Greenleaf or the lovely, ethereal Arwen as depicted in the Peter Jackson film of J. R. R. Tolkien’s Ring saga by actors Orlando Bloom and Liv Tyler. While the elves in Tolkien’s vision are tall and stately beings, tradition has most often portrayed elves and their fellow citizens from the unseen realm as diminutive, hence, “the wee people.” Small in stature though they may be, elves, the “Hidden Folk,” are not beings with whom to trifle.
      Careless or disrespectful humans who trespass on forest glens, rivers, or lakes considered sacred to elves may suffer terrible consequences—even cruel deaths. Entrepreneurs who wish to desecrate land whereon lie fairy circles or mounds in order to build a road or construct a commercial building may find themselves combating an unseen enemy who will accept only their unconditional surrender.
      Trouble at the Herring Plant
      In 1962, the new owners of a herring-processing plant in Iceland decided to enlarge the work area of the building. According to Icelandic tradition, landowners must not fail to reserve a small area of their property for the Hidden Folk, and a number of the established residents earnestly pointed out to the recent arrivals that any addition to the processing plant would encroach upon the plot of ground that the original owners had respectfully set aside for the elves who lived under the ground.
      In a condescending manner, the businessmen explained that they didn’t harbor those old superstitions and neither did their highly qualified construction crew who had modern, unbreakable drill bits and plenty of explosives.
      But the bits of the “unbreakable” drills began to shatter, one after another.
      An old farmer came forward to repeat the warning that the crew was trespassing on land that belonged to the Hidden Folk.
      The workmen laughed when the old man walked away—but the drill bits kept breaking.
      Finally, the manager of the plant, although professing disbelief in such nonsense, agreed to the local residents’ recommendation that he consult a local elf seer to establish contact with the Hidden Folk and attempt to make peace with them. The seer informed the manager that there was a very powerful member of the Hidden Folk who had selected the plot near the herring-processing plant as his personal dwelling place. He was not an unreasonable being, however. Elves really do try to get along with humans and compromise whenever they can to avoid violence. If the processing plant really needed the plot for its expansion, the elf seer said, the Hidden One would agree to find another place to live. He asked only for five days without any drilling, so that he could make his arrangements to move.
      The manager felt a bit strange bargaining with a being that was invisible—and, as far as he was concerned, imaginary. But he looked over at the pile of broken drill bits and told the seer that the Hidden One had a deal. Work on the site was shut down for five days to give the elf a chance to move. When five days had passed and the workmen resumed drilling, the work went smoothly and efficiently until the addition to the plant was completed. There were no more shattered drill bits.
      Because the incident cited above occurred in 1962—practically medieval times in some young people’s minds—many readers will no doubt assume that Icelanders of the 21st century no longer cherish such quaint beliefs. Those readers would be wrong.
      In the Boston Herald, December 25, 2005, Ric Bourie wrote that highway engineers and construction crews still regard the Hidden Folk very seriously: “Mischief befalls Icelandic road builders who can’t recognize good elf domain, including breakdowns of heavy equipment and even worker mishaps and injuries. It is said to have happened on more than one job site, enough to take the mythology seriously. Consequently, road planners here consult with an elf expert before routing a road or highway through rock piles that may be elf habitat.”
      Bourie interviewed elf seer Erla Stefansdottir, who named elves, gnomes, dwarves, angels, light-fairies, and “the hidden people” as all belonging to classes of what she called elfin beings. Any of the above-named entities, Ms. Stefansdottir said, “…can get quite upset if we ruin their houses or go against their wishes. They get very upset and we have to face the consequences. They can put a spell on us.”
      Fairy Mound Disturbed
      While some people may be surprised that stereotypically stoic Scandinavians believe in elves and other beings from the hidden world, it seems that the whole world embraces the stereotype of the country folk of Ireland taking their wee people seriously. According to popular leprechaun and elf stories, the Irish know that to disturb the mounds or raths in which they dwell is to invite severe supernatural consequences.
      Since ancient times, it seems that the Irish have understood that there are certain areas that the wee ones consider sacrosanct, special to them. Certain mounds, caves, creek areas, and forest clearings have been staked out by the Hidden Ones as their very own, and the wise human, sensitively in touch with the natural environment, knows better than to trespass on such ground.



      > continue to page two

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jahnets
      This was a great story or stories... I have seen the faerie a number of times. I love them dearly. I would welcome them to my land anytime... Dear Friends,
      Message 2 of 2 , May 2, 2006
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        This was a great story or stories... I have seen the faerie a number of
        times. I love them dearly. I would welcome them to my land anytime...



        Dear Friends,

        Click the link if you can't proceed to page 2.

        http://fatemag.com/issues/2000s/2006-05article1a.html

        Love and Light.

        David

        You Never Want to Cross an Elf
        By Brad Steiger
        FATE :: May 2006
        For many people today, the image of an elf is firmly established in the
        characters of either the handsome Legolas Greenleaf or the lovely, ethereal
        Arwen as depicted in the Peter Jackson film of J. R. R. Tolkien’s Ring saga
        by actors Orlando Bloom and Liv Tyler. While the elves in Tolkien’s vision
        are tall and stately beings, tradition has most often portrayed elves and
        their fellow citizens from the unseen realm as diminutive, hence, “the wee
        people.” Small in stature though they may be, elves, the “Hidden Folk,” are
        not beings with whom to trifle.
        Careless or disrespectful humans who trespass on forest glens, rivers,
        or lakes considered sacred to elves may suffer terrible consequences—even
        cruel deaths. Entrepreneurs who wish to desecrate land whereon lie fairy
        circles or mounds in order to build a road or construct a commercial
        building may find themselves combating an unseen enemy who will accept only
        their unconditional surrender.
        Trouble at the Herring Plant
        In 1962, the new owners of a herring-processing plant in Iceland decided
        to enlarge the work area of the building. According to Icelandic tradition,
        landowners must not fail to reserve a small area of their property for the
        Hidden Folk, and a number of the established residents earnestly pointed out
        to the recent arrivals that any addition to the processing plant would
        encroach upon the plot of ground that the original owners had respectfully
        set aside for the elves who lived under the ground.
        In a condescending manner, the businessmen explained that they didn’t
        harbor those old superstitions and neither did their highly qualified
        construction crew who had modern, unbreakable drill bits and plenty of
        explosives.
        But the bits of the “unbreakable” drills began to shatter, one after
        another.
        An old farmer came forward to repeat the warning that the crew was
        trespassing on land that belonged to the Hidden Folk.
        The workmen laughed when the old man walked away—but the drill bits kept
        breaking.
        Finally, the manager of the plant, although professing disbelief in such
        nonsense, agreed to the local residents’ recommendation that he consult a
        local elf seer to establish contact with the Hidden Folk and attempt to make
        peace with them. The seer informed the manager that there was a very
        powerful member of the Hidden Folk who had selected the plot near the
        herring-processing plant as his personal dwelling place. He was not an
        unreasonable being, however. Elves really do try to get along with humans
        and compromise whenever they can to avoid violence. If the processing plant
        really needed the plot for its expansion, the elf seer said, the Hidden One
        would agree to find another place to live. He asked only for five days
        without any drilling, so that he could make his arrangements to move.
        The manager felt a bit strange bargaining with a being that was
        invisible—and, as far as he was concerned, imaginary. But he looked over at
        the pile of broken drill bits and told the seer that the Hidden One had a
        deal. Work on the site was shut down for five days to give the elf a chance
        to move. When five days had passed and the workmen resumed drilling, the
        work went smoothly and efficiently until the addition to the plant was
        completed. There were no more shattered drill bits.
        Because the incident cited above occurred in 1962—practically medieval
        times in some young people’s minds—many readers will no doubt assume that
        Icelanders of the 21st century no longer cherish such quaint beliefs. Those
        readers would be wrong.
        In the Boston Herald, December 25, 2005, Ric Bourie wrote that highway
        engineers and construction crews still regard the Hidden Folk very
        seriously: “Mischief befalls Icelandic road builders who can’t recognize
        good elf domain, including breakdowns of heavy equipment and even worker
        mishaps and injuries. It is said to have happened on more than one job site,
        enough to take the mythology seriously. Consequently, road planners here
        consult with an elf expert before routing a road or highway through rock
        piles that may be elf habitat.”
        Bourie interviewed elf seer Erla Stefansdottir, who named elves, gnomes,
        dwarves, angels, light-fairies, and “the hidden people” as all belonging to
        classes of what she called elfin beings. Any of the above-named entities,
        Ms. Stefansdottir said, “…can get quite upset if we ruin their houses or go
        against their wishes. They get very upset and we have to face the
        consequences. They can put a spell on us.”
        Fairy Mound Disturbed
        While some people may be surprised that stereotypically stoic
        Scandinavians believe in elves and other beings from the hidden world, it
        seems that the whole world embraces the stereotype of the country folk of
        Ireland taking their wee people seriously. According to popular leprechaun
        and elf stories, the Irish know that to disturb the mounds or raths in which
        they dwell is to invite severe supernatural consequences.
        Since ancient times, it seems that the Irish have understood that there
        are certain areas that the wee ones consider sacrosanct, special to them.
        Certain mounds, caves, creek areas, and forest clearings have been staked
        out by the Hidden Ones as their very own, and the wise human, sensitively in
        touch with the natural environment, knows better than to trespass on such
        ground.



        > continue to page two

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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