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  • Jahnets
    So that would be around the Equinox... http://users.gloryroad.net/~bigjim/index.htm Sure can, remember Atlantis was off the cost of Portugal... Also Edgar
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 2, 2006
      So that would be around the Equinox...

      http://users.gloryroad.net/~bigjim/index.htm

      Sure can, remember Atlantis was off the cost of Portugal... Also Edgar Casey
      did say the East coast would go first and then California would have three
      weeks... Also the mayan elder that put out that prediction said within six
      months from 10/2 which would be through 3/30.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jahnets
      Note North Pole and large earthquakes just above Russian volcanos on Pacific... http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/Maps/ortho/270_90.php [Non-text
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 27, 2006
        Note North Pole and large earthquakes just above Russian volcanos on
        Pacific...


        http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/Maps/ortho/270_90.php


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jahnets
        http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/05/31/news/climate.php Arctic greenhouse: 55 million years ago, it was balmy By Andrew C. Revkin
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 7, 2006
          http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/05/31/news/climate.php


          Arctic greenhouse: 55 million years ago, it was balmy
          By Andrew C. Revkin </cgi-bin/search.cgi?query=By Andrew C.
          Revkin&sort=swishrank> The New York Times Published: May 31, 2006

          <http://www.iht.com/cgi-bin/search.cgi?query=&sort=swishrank>The first
          detailed analysis of an extraordinary climatic and biological record from
          the seabed near the North Pole shows that 55 million years ago the Arctic
          was much warmer than anyone had thought - a year-round average of 74 degrees
          Fahrenheit. The findings, detailed in three papers in the journal Nature,
          show how much remains to be learned about climate change, both natural and
          human- caused. But experts said that if anything, the papers suggest that
          scientists have greatly underestimated the power of greenhouse gases to warm
          the planet. Computer simulations done without the benefit of the seabed
          sampling do not reproduce an ancient Arctic nearly that warm, the authors of
          the analysis said, and thus must be missing elements that lead to greater
          warming. "Something extra happens when you push the world into a warmer
          world, and we just don't understand what it is," said one lead author, Henk
          Brinkhuis, an expert on Arctic ecology at the University of Utrecht in the
          Netherlands. At the same time, he said, the new work reveals no tendency in
          the polar climate system to turn things around, from warming to cooling.
          Some scientists have suggested that warming may be a self-limiting process.
          "There is nothing pointing in the other direction," Brinkhuis said. The
          studies draw on the work of a pioneering 2004 expedition that defied the
          Arctic Ocean ice and pulled the first significant samples from the ancient
          layered seabed just 150 miles, or 240 kilometers, from the North Pole: 1,400
          feet, or 425 meters, of slender shafts of muck, ancient organisms and rock
          representing a climate history that dates back 56 million years. While
          there is ample fossil evidence around the edges of the Arctic showing great
          past swings in climate, the ocean itself has been a glaring blank spot in
          scientists' understanding of climate history. The new analysis confirms
          that the Arctic Ocean warmed to a remarkable degree 55 million years ago and
          that the warming was driven at least in part by an explosive buildup of
          heat-trapping greenhouse gases - one far greater than the current
          human-caused rise. The samples also chronicle the subsequent cooling, with
          many ups and downs, that the researchers said began about 45 million years
          ago and led to the cycles of ice ages and brief warm spells of the last
          several million years. Experts not connected with the studies said they
          support the idea that it is greenhouse gases - not variations in the Earth's
          orbit around the Sun - that largely determine the extent of warming or
          cooling. "In my opinion, the new research provides additional important
          evidence that greenhouse-gas changes controlled much of climate history,
          which strengthens the argument that greenhouse-gas changes are likely to
          control much of the climate future," said Richard Alley, a geoscientist at
          Penn State. The $12.5 million Arctic Coring Expedition, run by a consortium
          called the International Ocean Drilling Program, was the first to drill deep
          into the layers of sediment deposited over millions of years in the
          ice-cloaked Arctic. The samples were gathered late in the summer of 2004 as
          two icebreakers shattered huge drifting floes so a third ship could hold its
          position and bore into the bottom for nine days. Estimates of the prevailing
          temperatures in the different eras represented by the sedimentary layers
          were made in part by tracking the comings and goings of dinoflagellates, a
          kind of algae that typically indicate subtropical or tropical conditions.
          Because the samples lacked remains of shell-bearing plankton that are relied
          on to provide temperature records, the researchers used a newer method for
          approximating past temperatures: gauging changes in the chemical composition
          of the remains of a primitive phylum of microbes called Crenarchaeota. Some
          scientists familiar with the research said that while there were still
          questions about the precision of this method at temperatures like those in
          the ancient Arctic Ocean, it was clear that the area was extraordinarily
          warm. Another significant discovery came in layers from 49 million years
          ago, where conditions suddenly fostered the summertime growth of vast mats
          of an ancient cousin of the Azolla duckweed that now cloaks suburban ponds.
          The researchers propose that this occurred when straits closed between the
          Arctic Ocean and the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The flow of water from
          precipitation and rivers created a great pool of fresh water, but about
          800,000 years after the blossoming of duckweed began, it ended with a sudden
          warming of a few additional degrees. The researchers suggest that this
          signaled when shifting land formations reconnected the Arctic with the
          Atlantic, allowing salty warmer water to flow in, killing off the weed. The
          researchers said the sediments held hints that Earth's long slide to colder
          conditions and the recent cycle of ice ages and brief thaws began quite soon
          after the hothouse days 50 million years ago.
          <http://www.iht.com/cgi-bin/search.cgi?query=&sort=swishrank>The first
          detailed analysis of an extraordinary climatic and biological record from
          the seabed near the North Pole shows that 55 million years ago the Arctic
          was much warmer than anyone had thought - a year-round average of 74 degrees
          Fahrenheit. The findings, detailed in three papers in the journal Nature,
          show how much remains to be learned about climate change, both natural and
          human- caused. But experts said that if anything, the papers suggest that
          scientists have greatly underestimated the power of greenhouse gases to warm
          the planet. Computer simulations done without the benefit of the seabed
          sampling do not reproduce an ancient Arctic nearly that warm, the authors of
          the analysis said, and thus must be missing elements that lead to greater
          warming. "Something extra happens when you push the world into a warmer
          world, and we just don't understand what it is," said one lead author, Henk
          Brinkhuis, an expert on Arctic ecology at the University of Utrecht in the
          Netherlands. At the same time, he said, the new work reveals no tendency in
          the polar climate system to turn things around, from warming to cooling.
          Some scientists have suggested that warming may be a self-limiting process.
          "There is nothing pointing in the other direction," Brinkhuis said. The
          studies draw on the work of a pioneering 2004 expedition that defied the
          Arctic Ocean ice and pulled the first significant samples from the ancient
          layered seabed just 150 miles, or 240 kilometers, from the North Pole: 1,400
          feet, or 425 meters, of slender shafts of muck, ancient organisms and rock
          representing a climate history that dates back 56 million years. While
          there is ample fossil evidence around the edges of the Arctic showing great
          past swings in climate, the ocean itself has been a glaring blank spot in
          scientists' understanding of climate history. The new analysis confirms
          that the Arctic Ocean warmed to a remarkable degree 55 million years ago and
          that the warming was driven at least in part by an explosive buildup of
          heat-trapping greenhouse gases - one far greater than the current
          human-caused rise. The samples also chronicle the subsequent cooling, with
          many ups and downs, that the researchers said began about 45 million years
          ago and led to the cycles of ice ages and brief warm spells of the last
          several million years. Experts not connected with the studies said they
          support the idea that it is greenhouse gases - not variations in the Earth's
          orbit around the Sun - that largely determine the extent of warming or
          cooling. "In my opinion, the new research provides additional important
          evidence that greenhouse-gas changes controlled much of climate history,
          which strengthens the argument that greenhouse-gas changes are likely to
          control much of the climate future," said Richard Alley, a geoscientist at
          Penn State. The $12.5 million Arctic Coring Expedition, run by a consortium
          called the International Ocean Drilling Program, was the first to drill deep
          into the layers of sediment deposited over millions of years in the
          ice-cloaked Arctic. The samples were gathered late in the summer of 2004 as
          two icebreakers shattered huge drifting floes so a third ship could hold its
          position and bore into the bottom for nine days. Estimates of the prevailing
          temperatures in the different eras represented by the sedimentary layers
          were made in part by tracking the comings and goings of dinoflagellates, a
          kind of algae that typically indicate subtropical or tropical conditions.
          Because the samples lacked remains of shell-bearing plankton that are relied
          on to provide temperature records, the researchers used a newer method for
          approximating past temperatures: gauging changes in the chemical composition
          of the remains of a primitive phylum of microbes called Crenarchaeota. Some
          scientists familiar with the research said that while there were still
          questions about the precision of this method at temperatures like those in
          the ancient Arctic Ocean, it was clear that the area was extraordinarily
          warm. Another significant discovery came in layers from 49 million years
          ago, where conditions suddenly fostered the summertime growth of vast mats
          of an ancient cousin of the Azolla duckweed that now cloaks suburban ponds.
          The researchers propose that this occurred when straits closed between the
          Arctic Ocean and the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The flow of water from
          precipitation and rivers created a great pool of fresh water, but about
          800,000 years after the blossoming of duckweed began, it ended with a sudden
          warming of a few additional degrees. The researchers suggest that this
          signaled when shifting land formations reconnected the Arctic with the
          Atlantic, allowing salty warmer water to flow in, killing off the weed. The
          researchers said the sediments held hints that Earth's long slide to colder
          conditions and the recent cycle of ice ages and brief thaws began quite soon
          after the hothouse days 50 million years ago.




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jahnets
          Very interesting choice... http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14825585/ [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 15, 2006
            Very interesting choice...


            http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14825585/


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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