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Does Gravity Have Inertia?

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  • Light Eye
    Dear Friends, Here s the latest from Dr. Tom Van Flandern. http://www.metaresearch.org/cosmology/gravity/Does%20Gravity%20Have%20Inertia.asp Love and Light.
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 3 10:20 AM
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      Dear Friends,

      Here's the latest from Dr. Tom Van Flandern.

      http://www.metaresearch.org/cosmology/gravity/Does%20Gravity%20Have%20Inertia.asp

      Love and Light.

      David


      Does Gravity Have Inertia?

      Inertia: the tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest and the tendency of a body in motion to remain in motion.
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      Tom Van Flandern / Meta Research

      <tomvf@...>

      Abstract. » Gravity makes heavy and light bodies fall at the same rate. Gravity obeys the “equivalence principle”, and is just "curved space-time geometry" in geometric general relativity. But space-time curvature alone cannot initiate motion, and changes in momentum still require a force acting. Moreover, gravity can deviate slightly from the “equivalence principle”, and “space-time” is really just proper time and does not involve any curvature of space. The Le Sage “pushing gravity” concept is a better way to explain the physics of gravity. For forces other than gravity, the momentum transferred must be shared by all particles in the target body, producing what we call “inertia” -- a simple dilution of momentum. Gravity obeys the “transparency principle”, allowing momentum to be transferred directly to each particle. Without need for dilution of momentum, gravity has no inertia. «

      Gravity is different from the other known forces of nature. All bodies, big and small, accelerate at equal rates in any given gravitational field. That property is opposite to our everyday experience, in which more massive bodies require more work to move or accelerate than less massive ones. That gravity accelerates masses of all size with equal ease is so anti-intuitive that people universally believed otherwise until Galileo’s demonstration at the Leaning Tower of Pisa. He simultaneously dropped a heavy and a light mass (both heavy enough that air resistance was not a factor), and observers below tried to time which hit first and by how much. But to the astonishment of the observers, who were certain that the heavier body would fall faster, the two masses reached the ground at the same time.



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