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When Do We Use The G Particle?

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  • Dex
    (Note: In cases like this, I d like to ask D. Burisch..for his personal assistance experimenting with the G Particle. It may either make it worst or be the
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 29, 2007
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      (Note: In cases like this, I'd like to ask D. Burisch..for his personal assistance experimenting with the G Particle.
      It may either make it worst or be the cure? What harm is there in trying?)

      Dex
      ******************

      Science File
      L. A. Times-today

      RARE LAKE AMOEBA enters through nose, kills people

      A jump in U.S. cases--
      six this year, one of them in Arizona--
      worries heath officials as water gets warmer.
      -----------------------
      From the Associated Press
      ----------------------

      PHOENIX--It sounds like science fiction, but it's true: killer amoebas living in lakes can enter through the nose and attack the brain, where they feed until you die.

      Through encounters with the microscopic bug are extraordinarily rare, it is known to have killed six boys and young men in the United States this year; over the decade ending in 2004, the yearly average was 2.3.
      The jump in cases has heath officials concerned.
      "'This is definitely something we need to track." said Michael Beach, a specialist in recreational waterborne illnesses with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "This is a heat-loving amoeba. As water temperatures go up, it does better. In future decades, as temperatures rise, we'd expect to see more cases.
      The amoeba, called Naegleria fowleri, killed 23 people in the U.S. from 1995 to 2004, the CDC knows of only several hundred cases worldwide since the microbe's discovery in Australia in the 1960's.
      This year there have been three cases in Florida, two in Texas and one in Arizona.
      Though infection's tend to be found, in Southern states, Naegleria lives almost anywhere: in lakes, hot springs, even dirty swimming pools, grazing off algae and bacteria in the sediment.
      A person wading through shallow water stirs up the bottom, and if the water gets up the person's nose, the amoeba can latch onto the olfactory nerve, which is responsible for conveying smells to the brain.
      The amoeba makes it's way to the brain, destroying tissue as it goes, Beach says.
      The easy way to prevent infection, Beach said, is to use a nose clip when swimming or diving in fresh water.
      People who are infected tend to complain of a stiff neck, headaches and fever. In the later stages, they show signs of brain damage, such as. hallucinations and behavioral changes, he said.
      Some drugs have stopped the amoeba in the lab experiments, but people who have been infected rarely survive, Beach said. "Usually, from the initial exposure it's fatal within two weeks,"he says.
      In Central Florida, authorities stated an amoeba phone hotline advising people to avoid warm standing water and areas blooms. Texas officials also have issued warnings.
      Officials in Lake Havasu City in Arizona, where one boy may have become infected, are discussing whether to take action.
      "Some folks think we should be putting up signs," city spokesman Charles Cassens said.
      "Some people think we should close the lake."
      Beach cautioned that people shouldn't panic about the dangers of brain-eating bug.
      Cases are still extremely rare.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • masanga@talktalk.net
      Dex, I think the simple answer to your question is probably that we will never get to use it. Apparently it is in the hands of the secret government and
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 1, 2007
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        Dex,

        I think the simple answer to your question is probably that "we"
        will never get to use it. Apparently it is in the hands of the secret
        government and there it seems likely to stay to me.

        We might wonder, perhaps, what possible use they might have for it
        that requires it to be kept out of the public domain, at least for the time
        being, when it could obviously do so much good in the world. Or could it?
        If the GP was simply released into the world indiscriminately and given to
        all and sundry, everyone and everything that has a body made of organic
        cells could be healed and that means all life on the planet, including
        murderers, mosquitos, parasites, pirhanas, bacteria, etc etc.

        Evidently then the GP needs to be applied selectively and in a
        controlled way if it is to be productive of positive, rather than negative
        end results. The question then arises as to who should do the selecting and
        controlling. Can we trust the secret government to do these things wisely
        and for the benefit of the whole world? Or would they use it selectively
        for their own benefit? Judging by all the calculated chaos and suffering
        that they have already caused in the world to date, I would not personally
        trust them to administer an aspirin to someone who has a headache without
        also conducting a germ-warfare experiment or a secret drug trial upon them.
        Their actions speak truly for them although their words may be full of
        flummery, eyewash and false self-justification.

        In recent years, the US military (which I think we can take it that
        the secret government controls) has been accumulating a staggering arsenal
        of biowarfare agents under the cloak of "combatting bioterrorism". Under
        this program of bioweapons acquisitions, it apparently has been resurrecting
        some of the world's most pernicious viruses that were on the point of
        extinction - sometimes due to the determined efforts of the world community
        to make them so, as in the case of smallpox for instance - and then
        genetically modifying them and bonding them with other pernicious viruses to
        make them even more pernicious and aggressive. Neither humanity nor any
        other creature on earth has acquired an immunity to these GM-viruses and if
        they were to be released indiscriminately they could wipe out all biological
        life on earth, at least down to the microbial level. This may be an
        exaggeration and a worst case scenario but it is at least a theoretical
        possibility. A more realistic possibility is that they could be genetically
        matched to target specific species, races, or other genetic groups.

        Of course, there would be no point in the secret government
        releasing the GM viruses into the general population unless it had an
        antidote to give to the people and other organisms which it wanted to save.
        And it would appear that, thanks to the efforts of Dr Dan Burisch, it has
        one - the Ganesh Particle.

        It looks to me as though Dr Dan has placed Huxley's "Brave New
        World" within their reach. Great for the élite Alpha-types of this world.
        Not so great for the Betas, Gammas and Deltas though - if they were
        allowed to survive.

        Regan


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Dex
        To: UFO-Prepare4contact
        Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2007 4:08 PM
        Subject: [ufodiscussion] When Do We Use The G Particle?


        (Note: In cases like this, I'd like to ask D. Burisch..for his personal
        assistance experimenting with the G Particle.
        It may either make it worst or be the cure? What harm is there in trying?)

        Dex
        ******************

        Science File
        L. A. Times-today

        RARE LAKE AMOEBA enters through nose, kills people

        A jump in U.S. cases--
        six this year, one of them in Arizona--
        worries heath officials as water gets warmer.
        -----------------------
        From the Associated Press
        ----------------------

        PHOENIX--It sounds like science fiction, but it's true: killer amoebas
        living in lakes can enter through the nose and attack the brain, where they
        feed until you die.

        Through encounters with the microscopic bug are extraordinarily rare, it is
        known to have killed six boys and young men in the United States this year;
        over the decade ending in 2004, the yearly average was 2.3.
        The jump in cases has heath officials concerned.
        "'This is definitely something we need to track." said Michael Beach, a
        specialist in recreational waterborne illnesses with the Centers for Disease
        Control and Prevention. "This is a heat-loving amoeba. As water temperatures
        go up, it does better. In future decades, as temperatures rise, we'd expect
        to see more cases.
        The amoeba, called Naegleria fowleri, killed 23 people in the U.S. from 1995
        to 2004, the CDC knows of only several hundred cases worldwide since the
        microbe's discovery in Australia in the 1960's.
        This year there have been three cases in Florida, two in Texas and one in
        Arizona.
        Though infection's tend to be found, in Southern states, Naegleria lives
        almost anywhere: in lakes, hot springs, even dirty swimming pools, grazing
        off algae and bacteria in the sediment.
        A person wading through shallow water stirs up the bottom, and if the water
        gets up the person's nose, the amoeba can latch onto the olfactory nerve,
        which is responsible for conveying smells to the brain.
        The amoeba makes it's way to the brain, destroying tissue as it goes, Beach
        says.
        The easy way to prevent infection, Beach said, is to use a nose clip when
        swimming or diving in fresh water.
        People who are infected tend to complain of a stiff neck, headaches and
        fever. In the later stages, they show signs of brain damage, such as.
        hallucinations and behavioral changes, he said.
        Some drugs have stopped the amoeba in the lab experiments, but people who
        have been infected rarely survive, Beach said. "Usually, from the initial
        exposure it's fatal within two weeks,"he says.
        In Central Florida, authorities stated an amoeba phone hotline advising
        people to avoid warm standing water and areas blooms. Texas officials also
        have issued warnings.
        Officials in Lake Havasu City in Arizona, where one boy may have become
        infected, are discussing whether to take action.
        "Some folks think we should be putting up signs," city spokesman Charles
        Cassens said.
        "Some people think we should close the lake."
        Beach cautioned that people shouldn't panic about the dangers of
        brain-eating bug.
        Cases are still extremely rare.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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