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Airman Exposing Nukes May Be Dead?

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  • Dex
    UPDATE: From Shady Updated 15 September 2007 at 1933 HRS EDT REPORT: ALL FOUR MILITARY MEMBERS INVOLVED IN EXPOSING THE ACCIDENTAL MOVEMENT OF NUCLEAR BOMBS
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 15, 2007
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      UPDATE:
      From Shady
      Updated 15 September 2007 at 1933 HRS EDT
      REPORT: ALL FOUR MILITARY MEMBERS INVOLVED IN EXPOSING THE "ACCIDENTAL" MOVEMENT OF NUCLEAR BOMBS FROM MINOT AFB TO BARKSDALE AFB ARE NOW DEAD
      IN ADDITION, ONE AIR FORCE MEMBER INVOLVED IN SECURITY FOR THOSE BOMBS IS ALSO DEAD

      I am working on confirming the details but at this time I can tell you I have information indicating these military members have been killed. Check back later. . . . more details to follow



      http://www.kfyrtv.com/News_Stories.asp?news=10465

      Minot Base Officials Say Airman Dies While On Leave
      9/12/2007

      The Minot Air Force Base said an airman has died while on leave in Virginia.

      Airman First Class Todd Blue, who was 20 years old, died Monday while visiting with family members.

      The statement did not say how he died.

      The base said Blue was a response force member assigned to the 5th Security Forces Squadron.

      He enlisted in the Air Force in March 2006 and was assigned to the Minot base the following August.

      His squadron commander said Blue was known to step up to help out his fellow airmen.

      ---------------------------------------------------

      http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070915/BREAKINGNEWS/70915012




      From Dex:

      Covert Attempt To Nuke Iran Foiled By Leak?
      http://www.roguegovernment.com/news.php?id=3859

      Critically exploring whether or not there was a covert attempt to instigate a catastrophic nuclear war against Iran is illuminated through an introduction using the recent B-52 Incident. On August 30, a B-52 bomber armed with five nuclear-tipped Advanced Cruise missiles travelled from Minot Air Force base, North Dakota, to Barksdale Air Force base, Louisiana, in the United States. Each missile had an adjustable yield between five and 150 kilotons of TNT which is at the lower end of the destructive capacities of U.S. nuclear weapons. For example, the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima had a yield of 13 kilotons, while the Bravo Hydrogen bomb test of 1954 had a yield of 15,000 kilotons. The B-52 story was first covered in the Army Times on 5 September after the nuclear armed aircraft was discovered by Airmen. LINK

      What made this a very significant event was that it was a violation of U.S. Air Force regulations concerning the transportation of nuclear weapons by air. Nuclear weapons are normally transported by air in specially constructed planes designed to prevent radioactive pollution in case of a crash. Such transport planes are not equipped to launch the nuclear weapons they routinely carry around the U.S. and the world for servicing or positioning.

      The discovery of the nuclear armed B-52 was, according to Hans Kristensen, a nuclear weapons expert at the Federation of American Scientists, the first time in 40 years that a nuclear armed plane had been allowed to fly in the U.S. LINK. Since 1968, after a SAC bomber crashed in Greenland, all nuclear armed aircraft have been grounded but were kept on a constant state of alert. After the end of the Cold War, President George H. Bush ordered in 1991 that nuclear weapons were to be removed from all aircraft and stored in nearby facilities.

      Recently, the Air Force began decommissioning its stockpile of Advanced Cruise missiles. The five nuclear weapons on the B-52 were to be decommissioned, and were to be taken to another Air Force base. An Air Force press statement issued on 6 September 2007, claimed that there "was an error which occurred during a regularly scheduled transfer of weapons between two bases."

      Furthermore, the statement declared: "The Air Force maintains the highest standards of safety and precision so any deviation from these well established munitions procedures is considered very serious." The issue concerning how a nuclear armed B-52 bomber was allowed to take off and fly in U.S. air space after an 'error' in a routine transfer process, is now subject to an official Air Force inquiry which is due to be completed by September 14.

      Three key questions emerge over the B-52 incident. First, did Air Force personnel at Minot AFB not spot the 'error' earlier given the elaborate security procedures in place to prevent such mistakes from occurring? Many military analysts have commented on the stringent security procedures in place to prevent this sort of mistake from occurring. Multiple officers are routinely involved in the transportation and loading of nuclear weapons to prevent the kind of 'error' that allegedly occurred in the B-52 incident.

      According to the U.S. Air Force statement, the commanding officer in charge of military munitions personnel and additional munitions airmen were relieved of duties pending the completion of the investigation. According to Kristensen, the error could not have come from confusing the Advanced Cruise Missile with a conventional weapons since no conventional form exists. So the munitions Airmen should have been easily able to spot the mistake. Other routine procedures were violated which suggests a rather obvious explanation for the error. The military munitions personnel were acting under direct orders, though not through the regular chain of military command. This takes me to the second question

      Who was in Charge of the B-52 Incident?


      http://houston.craigslist.org/pol/417171235.html

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