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Re: [turkishlearner] kusura bakma

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  • r.riedy@att.net
    Biraz evvel onunla calistigim bir arkadasima bir sey sordum. Karsilik vermedi. Daha da yuksek sesle tekrar ettim. Benden yana donup pek orali olmamis gibi
    Message 1 of 38 , Jul 1, 2007
      Biraz evvel onunla calistigim bir arkadasima bir sey sordum. Karsilik vermedi. Daha da yuksek sesle tekrar ettim. Benden yana donup pek orali olmamis gibi "Beg pardon?" diye mirildandi. Yani hem soyledigimi isitmedigini acikliyor hem de soruyu tekrar etmemi istiyordu, besbelli. Ben dogma buyume ABD'liyim. Bahiskonusu ifadeyi ben de baskalari da kullaniriz. Sujesi gecmis gunlerin Amerikan Guneyi olan filimleri pek gormuslugum yoktur. Elbette kusurun vukubuldugu yerde Kusura bakma demek yerinde olur. (Ben nedense daima Kusuruma bakma derim. Ogrendigim adab-i muaseret olsa gerek.).

      A short while ago I asked a friend with whom I'm working something. He did not reply. I repeated it even louder. He turned toward me and rather vaguely whispered, "Beg pardon?" Meaning he obviously was disclosing he didn't hear what I said and wanted me to repeat the question. I am born and raised in the USA. I and others use the expression in question. I definitely haven't much experience in seeing films that treat of the "Old South." Certainly it is always correct to say Kusura bakma where a shortcoming has occurred. (I for some reason always say Excuse MY shortcoming). It must be the etiquette I learned.)

      ------------- Original message from Laura Blumenthal <kafetzou2@...>: --------------


      In North America, we say, "I'm sorry, but I don't see it that way", or,
      more formally, "With all due respect, we don't see eye to eye", or
      something like that. But anyway, that's not what "Kusura bakma" means.

      I guess it would be something like, "Pardon, ama ..." Let's see what
      the Turkish native speakers say.

      Laura 3:)

      P.S. I have NEVER heard "beg pardon" used in North America except in
      old movies set in the Deep South.

      On Jun 30, 2007, at 3:42 PM, r.riedy@... wrote:

      > Laura: However, do you not say "I beg your pardon" in English when
      > you wish to differ with or contradict someone? And how do you convey
      > that sense in Turkish?
      >
      >
      > -------------- Original message from Laura Blumenthal
      > <kafetzou2@...>: --------------
      >
      > What Ahmet has given below is the literal translation/meaning of the
      > phrase, but it is not correct English.
      >
      > Only two of these are correct English, "I beg your pardon", which I
      > would never say because it sounds very quaint and old-fashioned, and
      > "Forgive me", which I would say, but which is only for very extreme
      > situations. Please see Arzu's post for the correct translation.
      > Carole, Mehmet and ��mer also posted correct translations.
      >
      > Laura 3:)
      >
      > On Jun 29, 2007, at 11:56 AM, Ahmet SIMSEK wrote:
      >
      >> Kusura bakma!= I made a fault or blame, please pretend not to see it!
      >>
      >> Kusura bakma! = I beg your pardon!
      >> Kusura bakma! = May not you see my fault?
      >> Kusura bakma! = Forgive me!
      >> Kusura bakma! = Please ignore my blame!
      >>
      >> etc. etc. etc. :)))
      >>
      >> http://www.zargan.com/sozluk.asp?Sozcuk=kusura+bakma&x=746
      >>
      >> ----- Original Message ----
      >> From: Laura Blumenthal <kafetzou2@...>
      >> To: turkishlearner@yahoogroups.com
      >> Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2007 1:54:00 AM
      >> Subject: Re: [turkishlearner] kusura bakma
      >>
      >> I was having a senior moment and suddenly wasn't sure. OK - I know it
      >> - happy? ;)
      >>
      >> Laura 3:)
      >>
      >> On Jun 22, 2007, at 3:42 PM, carol williams wrote:
      >>
      >>> You "think" it?
      >>>
      >>> Laura Blumenthal <kafetzou2@yahoo. ca> wrote: I think that's "��z��r
      >>> dilerim".
      >>>
      >>> Laura 3:)
      >>>
      >>> On Jun 22, 2007, at 3:56 AM, carol williams wrote:
      >>>
      >>>> I think in Turkish how you apologise is about seriousness so:
      >>>>
      >>>> If I bump into you in the street - "Pardon!"
      >>>> If I haven't paid your money back - "Kusura bakma" "��zer dilerim"
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Laura Blumenthal
      P.S. Are you saying that the WHOLE translation was wrong? Can you be a bit more specific?
      Message 38 of 38 , Nov 13, 2007
        P.S. Are you saying that the WHOLE translation was wrong? Can you be a
        bit more specific?

        On Nov 13, 2007, at 9:13 PM, Laura Blumenthal wrote:

        > It wasn't a joke. Pardon me if my Turkish isn't perfect. But you're
        > right that I should have known the difference between "sil baştan" and
        > "sil başından". Kusura bakmayın.
        >
        > Laura 3:(
        >
        > On Nov 13, 2007, at 8:58 AM, a. wrote:
        >
        >> This translation is wrong... even if as a joke... because "(sil)
        >> baştan"
        >> means "(erase it and start) again from the beginning" and not "(erase
        >> 'it')
        >> from your head"
        >> Regards
        >> a.
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