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Re: translation help

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  • UJakuhom@web.de
    ... Hello Jan, this sentence is very difficult to translate. I asked my turkish wife and she didn´t exactly know the word dehr ( =world with all aspects),
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 1, 2000
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      --- In turkishlearner@egroups.com, jan.vanderstockt@s... wrote:
      > Hello,
      >
      > I am a belgian learner of Turkish. Together with two friends I
      > started up a turkish reading group.
      > Now we're reading "Babam evi" by Orhan Kemal.
      > Who can help us with the translation of the second sentence:
      >
      > Dedem benim doGdumu babama benim imzamla Söyle tellemiS:
      > "Ben de dehr'in sitemin çekmeGe geldim dehr'e".
      >
      > Thankyou very much.
      >
      > Jan Van der Stockt
      > Belgium

      Hello Jan,

      this sentence is very difficult to translate. I asked my turkish wife
      and she didn´t exactly know the word "dehr"( =world with all aspects),
      because the society of Turkish language is eliminating almoust all
      words of arab or persian origin.
      The context : I child is born- the author.

      " My grandfather informed my father by (phone or telegramm) with my
      approval(imza= signature): Totally conscious of all worldly problems I
      would have to stand, I agreed to come to this world". -> this means
      the grandfather speaks acting for the author. Probably the father is
      far away.
      I hope my poor English will be sufficient to explain the sense.

      Best wishes Ulrich
    • Arzu Coltekin
      Hello, and welcome to Jan and Ulrich, ... Jan, is this Baba evi or Babam evi ? I d expect it to be either baba evi or babamIn evi if it is not a poetic
      Message 2 of 16 , Nov 1, 2000
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        Hello,
        and welcome to Jan and Ulrich,

        > Now we're reading "Babam evi" by Orhan Kemal.
        > Who can help us with the translation of the second sentence:

        > > Dedem benim doGdumu babama benim imzamla Söyle tellemiS:
        > > "Ben de dehr'in sitemin çekmeGe geldim dehr'e".

        Jan, is this "Baba evi" or "Babam evi"?
        I'd expect it to be either "baba evi" or "babamIn evi" if it is not a
        poetic (i.e. improper!) use.

        > this sentence is very difficult to translate. I asked my turkish wife
        > and she didn´t exactly know the word "dehr"( =world with all aspects),
        > because the society of Turkish language is eliminating almoust all
        > words of arab or persian origin.

        Yes, I also had to check a dictionary to see what "dehr" meant. Even if
        you knew the word "dher" it is a difficult (well, special) sentence. (Dehr
        both means "dUnya (world) and "zaman" (time) according to the dictionary).

        Ulrich's translation is very explanatory and that is also more or less
        what I understand from the sentence.

        But the sentence is unusual in a few different ways.

        -it skips the "-i" ending in "sitemin":

        Ben de dehr'in *sitemini* CekmeGe geldim dehr'e.
        Ben de zamanIn/dUnyanIn *sitemini* CekmeGe geldim dUnyaya.
        (I also came to this world to suffer the reproaches of it)

        This form without the -i ending, you can meet in some "folk-literature"
        but it is not usual for daily use.

        - it also uses the word "sitem" in a poetic way, which would normally mean
        "reproach" and it actually doesn't make sense with the world or time. it
        is generally people who "sitem" to other people.

        - it puts the upper coma (apostrophe) in the "dehr" which is a
        corious thing. In today's Turkish, we tend to put that if we use a
        completely foreign word in written language - but I don't know if that is
        a defined rule. Anyone?

        Orhan Kemal may be doing this because of the pronouncation
        of "dehr" (which is unknown to me) which they used in some Arabic-origin
        words earlier (e.g., cum'a) then it disappeared.

        > The context : I child is born- the author.
        >
        > " My grandfather informed my father by (phone or telegramm) with my
        > approval(imza= signature): Totally conscious of all worldly problems I
        > would have to stand, I agreed to come to this world". -> this means
        > the grandfather speaks acting for the author. Probably the father is
        > far away.

        It is telegram, not phone. :) "tellemek" is also unusual. it's for
        telegram and even for that the more often term would be "telgraf cekmek".

        I understand the same thing: the father is far away and the child is born,
        and the grandfather makes a telegram signed by the baby's name (as if the
        deep philosophical sentence was said by the baby).

        Sevgiler,
        Arzu
      • UJakuhom@web.de
        ... a ... wife ... aspects), ... if ... (Dehr ... dictionary). ... less ... folk-literature ... normally mean ... time. it ... that is ... Arabic-origin ...
        Message 3 of 16 , Nov 1, 2000
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          --- In turkishlearner@egroups.com, Arzu Coltekin <arzu@n...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello,
          > and welcome to Jan and Ulrich,
          >
          > > Now we're reading "Babam evi" by Orhan Kemal.
          > > Who can help us with the translation of the second sentence:
          >
          > > > Dedem benim doGdumu babama benim imzamla Söyle tellemiS:
          > > > "Ben de dehr'in sitemin çekmeGe geldim dehr'e".
          >
          > Jan, is this "Baba evi" or "Babam evi"?
          > I'd expect it to be either "baba evi" or "babamIn evi" if it is not
          a
          > poetic (i.e. improper!) use.
          >
          > > this sentence is very difficult to translate. I asked my turkish
          wife
          > > and she didn´t exactly know the word "dehr"( =world with all
          aspects),
          > > because the society of Turkish language is eliminating almoust all
          > > words of arab or persian origin.
          >
          > Yes, I also had to check a dictionary to see what "dehr" meant. Even
          if
          > you knew the word "dher" it is a difficult (well, special) sentence.
          (Dehr
          > both means "dUnya (world) and "zaman" (time) according to the
          dictionary).
          >
          > Ulrich's translation is very explanatory and that is also more or
          less
          > what I understand from the sentence.
          >
          > But the sentence is unusual in a few different ways.
          >
          > -it skips the "-i" ending in "sitemin":
          >
          > Ben de dehr'in *sitemini* CekmeGe geldim dehr'e.
          > Ben de zamanIn/dUnyanIn *sitemini* CekmeGe geldim dUnyaya.
          > (I also came to this world to suffer the reproaches of it)
          >
          > This form without the -i ending, you can meet in some
          "folk-literature"
          > but it is not usual for daily use.
          >
          > - it also uses the word "sitem" in a poetic way, which would
          normally mean
          > "reproach" and it actually doesn't make sense with the world or
          time. it
          > is generally people who "sitem" to other people.
          >
          > - it puts the upper coma (apostrophe) in the "dehr" which is a
          > corious thing. In today's Turkish, we tend to put that if we use a
          > completely foreign word in written language - but I don't know if
          that is
          > a defined rule. Anyone?
          >
          > Orhan Kemal may be doing this because of the pronouncation
          > of "dehr" (which is unknown to me) which they used in some
          Arabic-origin
          > words earlier (e.g., cum'a) then it disappeared.
          >
          > > The context : I child is born- the author.
          > >
          > > " My grandfather informed my father by (phone or telegramm) with
          my
          > > approval(imza= signature): Totally conscious of all worldly
          problems I
          > > would have to stand, I agreed to come to this world". -> this
          means
          > > the grandfather speaks acting for the author. Probably the father
          is
          > > far away.
          >
          > It is telegram, not phone. :) "tellemek" is also unusual. it's for
          > telegram and even for that the more often term would be "telgraf
          cekmek".
          >
          > I understand the same thing: the father is far away and the child is
          born,
          > and the grandfather makes a telegram signed by the baby's name (as
          if the
          > deep philosophical sentence was said by the baby).
          >
          > Sevgiler,
          > Arzu

          Merhaba Arzu,

          thanks a lot for your explanation. Which kind of dictionary do you
          use?
          I couldn´t find "dehr" in the "ArkadaS TuerkCe Sözlük" or in
          Turkish/German-dictionarys.
          I´d like to enjoy this elaborated language of Orhan Kemal in the
          Turkish original. Ama BIZIM iCin TürkCe zor, deGil mi?
          YardImIn iCin sana Cok teSekür ederim.

          Sevgiler Ulrich
        • jan.vanderstockt@skynet.be
          Thankyou Ulrich and Arzu, I think I now caught the meaning of this sentence. Arzu, this book s title is indeed Baba evi . Ulrich, the dictionary in which I
          Message 4 of 16 , Nov 1, 2000
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            Thankyou Ulrich and Arzu,
            I think I now caught the meaning of this sentence.
            Arzu, this book's title is indeed "Baba evi".
            Ulrich, the dictionary in which I found the meaning of "dehr"
            and "sitem", is the "Redhouse Turkish-English dictionary".
            Here are some more words and phrases of the translation of which I am
            not very sure:
            "davalaciro" in "Eee, dedi, davalaciro, ders ne âlemde?"
            "yazmalI" in "....camI cigara kâGIdIyla yazmalI bir de gaz lâmbasI"
            "terütenha" in "terütenha izler" ( ter is probably an intensifier of
            tenha ?)
            "az gittik, uz gittik, ......"
            "vizyersiz kabalaklar" vizyer comes probably from the
            french "visière" ?
            "mortiz" in "fiSek kovanlarIyla bir CeSit mortiz oynamaGa baSladIlar"
            "üstüste" in "bir oGlan ...benim üstüste düSürdüGüm ipin üzerinden
            aSIvermiSti"

            TeSekkürler,

            Jan
          • Arma'n Buker
            I d beg your pardon for the interruption for a minimal contribution, adding my humble opinion of thinking that the special meaning of the word sitem can not
            Message 5 of 16 , Nov 7, 2000
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              I'd beg your pardon for the interruption for a minimal contribution, adding
              my humble opinion of thinking that the special meaning of the word "sitem"
              can not be only a simple "reproach"; I think, in this very context, it has a
              "deeper" signification of "lamentation, suffering, pains"...

              Thank you for your attention

              Arma'n

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Arzu Coltekin <arzu@...>
              To: <turkishlearner@egroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2000 4:23 PM
              Subject: Re: [turkishlearner] Re: translation help



              Hello,
              and welcome to Jan and Ulrich,

              > Now we're reading "Babam evi" by Orhan Kemal.
              > Who can help us with the translation of the second sentence:

              > > Dedem benim doGdumu babama benim imzamla Söyle tellemiS:
              > > "Ben de dehr'in sitemin çekmeGe geldim dehr'e".

              Jan, is this "Baba evi" or "Babam evi"?
              I'd expect it to be either "baba evi" or "babamIn evi" if it is not a
              poetic (i.e. improper!) use.

              > this sentence is very difficult to translate. I asked my turkish wife
              > and she didn´t exactly know the word "dehr"( =world with all aspects),
              > because the society of Turkish language is eliminating almoust all
              > words of arab or persian origin.

              Yes, I also had to check a dictionary to see what "dehr" meant. Even if
              you knew the word "dher" it is a difficult (well, special) sentence. (Dehr
              both means "dUnya (world) and "zaman" (time) according to the dictionary).

              Ulrich's translation is very explanatory and that is also more or less
              what I understand from the sentence.

              But the sentence is unusual in a few different ways.

              -it skips the "-i" ending in "sitemin":

              Ben de dehr'in *sitemini* CekmeGe geldim dehr'e.
              Ben de zamanIn/dUnyanIn *sitemini* CekmeGe geldim dUnyaya.
              (I also came to this world to suffer the reproaches of it)

              This form without the -i ending, you can meet in some "folk-literature"
              but it is not usual for daily use.

              - it also uses the word "sitem" in a poetic way, which would normally mean
              "reproach" and it actually doesn't make sense with the world or time. it
              is generally people who "sitem" to other people.

              - it puts the upper coma (apostrophe) in the "dehr" which is a
              corious thing. In today's Turkish, we tend to put that if we use a
              completely foreign word in written language - but I don't know if that is
              a defined rule. Anyone?

              Orhan Kemal may be doing this because of the pronouncation
              of "dehr" (which is unknown to me) which they used in some Arabic-origin
              words earlier (e.g., cum'a) then it disappeared.

              > The context : I child is born- the author.
              >
              > " My grandfather informed my father by (phone or telegramm) with my
              > approval(imza= signature): Totally conscious of all worldly problems I
              > would have to stand, I agreed to come to this world". -> this means
              > the grandfather speaks acting for the author. Probably the father is
              > far away.

              It is telegram, not phone. :) "tellemek" is also unusual. it's for
              telegram and even for that the more often term would be "telgraf cekmek".

              I understand the same thing: the father is far away and the child is born,
              and the grandfather makes a telegram signed by the baby's name (as if the
              deep philosophical sentence was said by the baby).

              Sevgiler,
              Arzu





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            • Arzu Coltekin
              Uzun bir sessizlikten sonra tekrar merhaba! (Hi again, after a long silence) Jan s questions were just too tough for us poor simple people, that must explain
              Message 6 of 16 , Nov 20, 2000
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                Uzun bir sessizlikten sonra tekrar merhaba!
                (Hi again, after a long silence)

                Jan's questions were just too tough for us poor simple people, that must
                explain the silence. :)) Jan, next time, try to chose a modern writer ;)
                [Just kidding]

                I will give a try now hoping that it is still relevant.

                > Thankyou Ulrich and Arzu,

                My pleasure (benim iCin zevkti).

                > Here are some more words and phrases of the translation of which I am
                > not very sure:

                > "davalaciro" in "Eee, dedi, davalaciro, ders ne âlemde?"

                Davalaciro .. ehm..
                Must be a fictive character in the story. The word has no bearing as far
                as I know. Weird as a name too, but apperantly a name in this case
                (it must be a person).

                > "yazmalI" in "....camI cigara kâGIdIyla yazmalI bir de gaz lâmbasI"

                this sentence is peculiar too, here goes my suggestion:

                "..camI cigara kaGIdIyla yazmalI" is an adjective for "gaz lambasI"..

                "...also an oil-lamp whose glass was written by cigarette paper"

                Makes no sense, unless he's being ultra-poetic again. :) Or the sentences
                before and after can also help to make some sense of it. It may be using
                some local expression I am not aware of, or he may be talking about
                something he introduces in his book earlier. For me it's dark. I have a
                faint idea that it may mean "thin" (camI cigara kaGIdIyla yazmalI) since
                "sigara kaGIdI" is a normally very thin paper, but I can't connect.

                One thing here, to point, is to avoid the confusion to "yazmalI! = s/he
                must write!"

                yazmak = to write
                yazma = verbal noun, writing
                yazmalI = (something) with writing(s)

                (yazma, btw, has anoter meaning: a thin and white headscarf. that word
                though, has more to do with "yaz =summer" I tend to think. Any other
                speculations?)

                > "terütenha" in "terütenha izler" ( ter is probably an intensifier of
                > tenha ?)

                yes, I think your suggestion is correct: ter-U-tenha (very deserted, very
                lonely place)

                > "az gittik, uz gittik, ......"

                "we went a long way"
                it's an idiom (we went little, we went far). Often found in folk
                fairytales, followed by "az gittik uz gittik dere tepe dUz gittik", means
                they moved forward in their time and location .. :)

                > "vizyersiz kabalaklar" vizyer comes probably from the
                > french "visière" ?

                looks like it.
                vizyer = viziyer = kasket siperi = the shadowing part of a cap
                kabalak = a slang for bold (normally "kel")

                So, "those bold heads without a hat"

                > "mortiz" in "fiSek kovanlarIyla bir CeSit mortiz oynamaGa baSladIlar"

                Hm, must be a local game, I don't know. I have a memory of the word
                somewhere, but not right here available.. sorry.

                > "üstüste" in "bir oGlan ...benim üstüste düSürdüGüm ipin üzerinden
                > aSIvermiSti"

                UstUste : one after another/ again and again

                (one boy has just jumped over the rope I kept dropping again and again"

                $imdilik bu kadar (all for now),
                sevgiler,
                -arzu
              • Arzu Coltekin
                Merhaba Ulrich & everyone, (will write in two languages, keep up!) ... TUrkCe bazan bizim iCin de zor :) Ama evet, belki de sizin iCin ; yani anadili
                Message 7 of 16 , Nov 23, 2000
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                  Merhaba Ulrich & everyone,
                  (will write in two languages, keep up!)

                  > I´d like to enjoy this elaborated language of Orhan Kemal in the
                  > Turkish original. Ama BIZIM iCin TürkCe zor, deGil mi?
                  > YardImIn iCin sana Cok teSekür ederim.

                  TUrkCe bazan bizim iCin de zor :)

                  Ama evet, belki de "sizin iCin"; yani anadili hint-avrupa dillerinden olan
                  ki$iler iCin daha zor. Sadece, hatIrlatmak isterim ki, Almanca veya
                  Ingilizce gibi diller de BiZiM iCin zor - yani e$itiz! :)) Acaba bazI
                  diller gerCekten diGerlerinden daha mI zor OGreniliyor, ya da anadilimizin
                  ne olduGu Cok Onemli mi - sanIrIm bunlara verilebilecek kesin cevaplarImIz
                  yok. Tek bildiGimiz, CocuklarIn bu konuda (dil oGrenme konusunda) bizden
                  Cok daha cabUk ve kIvrak olduklarI.

                  ---- english ---

                  Turkish is difficult also for us sometimes :)

                  But yes, maybe for YOU, meaning for those who have their mother-toungues
                  within Indo-European languages it is harder. Only, I'd like to remind that
                  languages like English and German are harder for us - so we are equal! :))
                  Wondering if some languages are really harder to learn comparing to the
                  others, or does it really matter what our mother toungue is - I guess we
                  don't have very good answers for these questions. All we know is, the
                  kids, in this matter (in language learning), are much faster and cleverer
                  than us.

                  Sevgiler,
                  Arzu
                • Johnny Skaaning
                  Merhabalar, ... Wouldn t it be reasonable to assume that languages that are further away from your own regarding structure,syntax and vocabulary are harder to
                  Message 8 of 16 , Nov 23, 2000
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                    Merhabalar,

                    >Wondering if some languages are really harder to learn comparing to the
                    >others, or does it really matter what our mother toungue is - I guess we
                    >don't have very good answers for these questions. All we know is, the
                    >kids, in this matter (in language learning), are much faster and cleverer
                    >than us.

                    Wouldn't it be reasonable to assume that languages that are further away from
                    your own regarding structure,syntax and vocabulary are harder to learn ?

                    I think it's all about your starting point. Turkish is difficult for me because
                    of it's syntax that is about the opposite of Danish. Also, in Danish for
                    instance, there is hardly a trace of an accusative case ... to have to be aware
                    what's the object in the sentence causes problems both in German and Turkish for
                    me, because there's generally no such concern in Danish. Except with the
                    personal pronouns where we use it, it then comes all natural to me :)

                    Also, of course there's the matter whether your mother tongue 'cripples' your
                    pronounciation capabilities because you were brought up using a limited set of
                    sounds ... that has nothing to do with the actual learning of course, merely
                    with pronounciation.

                    I am sure English is easier to learn for a Dane than Turkish :) Azeri should be
                    easier for a Turk, or Özbek or sth like that ...

                    Johnny
                  • Tulin Ozen
                    Helo again, I guess you are right but when it comes to Turkish learners learning Azeri , I might say that it is-not a new language but some differences in
                    Message 9 of 16 , Nov 24, 2000
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                      Helo again,
                      I guess you are right but when it comes to Turkish

                      learners learning Azeri , I might say that it is-not a
                      new language but some differences in vocabulary and
                      for �zbek language it might be a little different.Let
                      me tell you a "fikra":
                      Azeri devlet adamlari Turk Parlementosunu ziyaret
                      ettiklerinde Ecevitle tanisip simdi de "k�hne
                      basbakani" g�relim demisler. Biliyorsun Anadolu
                      Turkcesinde k�hne eski,viran,yikik d�kuk demek halbuki
                      onlar "former " olarak kullanmak istemisler. Ya da
                      �zbek ucaginda pilotun anons ederken s�yledigi
                      "SAmelyotumuz az sonra dusecektir" ifadesi Turk
                      yolculari dehsete dusurebilir."Dusmek " inmek demek
                      halbuki... Neyse bir de kursla ilgili
                      cevaplari yazayim.Bu kurslar aynen Mayis 15 e kadar
                      devam ediyor.Modern Turkish 5 ; Turkish Conversation 5
                      ,Cultural Specializaton 6 ve Int.Turkish 5
                      credits.Umarim senin icin iyi olur .Simdilik
                      hoscakal.Iyi dersler Johnny Skaaning
                      <Johnny@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Merhabalar,
                      >
                      > >Wondering if some languages are really harder to
                      > learn comparing to the
                      > >others, or does it really matter what our mother
                      > toungue is - I guess we
                      > >don't have very good answers for these questions.
                      > All we know is, the
                      > >kids, in this matter (in language learning), are
                      > much faster and cleverer
                      > >than us.
                      >
                      > Wouldn't it be reasonable to assume that languages
                      > that are further away from
                      > your own regarding structure,syntax and vocabulary
                      > are harder to learn ?
                      >
                      > I think it's all about your starting point. Turkish
                      > is difficult for me because
                      > of it's syntax that is about the opposite of Danish.
                      > Also, in Danish for
                      > instance, there is hardly a trace of an accusative
                      > case ... to have to be aware
                      > what's the object in the sentence causes problems
                      > both in German and Turkish for
                      > me, because there's generally no such concern in
                      > Danish. Except with the
                      > personal pronouns where we use it, it then comes all
                      > natural to me :)
                      >
                      > Also, of course there's the matter whether your
                      > mother tongue 'cripples' your
                      > pronounciation capabilities because you were brought
                      > up using a limited set of
                      > sounds ... that has nothing to do with the actual
                      > learning of course, merely
                      > with pronounciation.
                      >
                      > I am sure English is easier to learn for a Dane than
                      > Turkish :) Azeri should be
                      > easier for a Turk, or �zbek or sth like that ...
                      >
                      > Johnny
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >


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                    • lokeren93
                      Merhaba, who can translate az da olsa in: Türk çalISan nüfusu az da olsa hizmetler grubuna doGru kaydI. TeSekkür ederim, Jan
                      Message 10 of 16 , Dec 10, 2001
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                        Merhaba,

                        who can translate "az da olsa" in: Türk çalISan nüfusu az da olsa
                        hizmetler grubuna doGru kaydI.

                        TeSekkür ederim,

                        Jan
                      • Johnny Skaaning
                        Merhaba Jan, l who can translate az da olsa in: Türk çalISan nüfusu az da olsa l hizmetler grubuna doGru kaydI. I can only guess: How about however
                        Message 11 of 16 , Dec 10, 2001
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                          Merhaba Jan,

                          l> who can translate "az da olsa" in: Türk çalISan nüfusu az da olsa
                          l> hizmetler grubuna doGru kaydI.

                          I can only guess: How about 'however little it was' or 'even if only
                          sligthly' so that the sentence would read 'The working Turkish
                          citizens, even if only slightly, slid towards the service group'

                          But actually I am not sure if 'az da olsa' qualifies 'Türk
                          çalýþan nufüsü' or 'kaydý' ... in the first case I would then get
                          a totally different sentence saying 'The working Turkish citizens,
                          however few they are, slid towards the service group.

                          Hey ! I was only trying to help and see where it got me :)))

                          /Johnny
                        • gokhan_kislali
                          Hello, I think even if slightly suits best. Gökhan
                          Message 12 of 16 , Dec 10, 2001
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                            Hello,

                            I think "even if slightly" suits best.

                            Gökhan

                            "--- In turkishlearner@y..., Johnny Skaaning <firefoot@g...> wrote:
                            > Merhaba Jan,
                            >
                            > l> who can translate "az da olsa" in: Türk çalISan nüfusu az da olsa
                            > l> hizmetler grubuna doGru kaydI.
                            >
                            > I can only guess: How about 'however little it was' or 'even if only
                            > sligthly' so that the sentence would read 'The working Turkish
                            > citizens, even if only slightly, slid towards the service group'
                            >
                            > But actually I am not sure if 'az da olsa' qualifies 'Türk
                            > çalışan nufüsü' or 'kaydı' ... in the first case I would then get
                            > a totally different sentence saying 'The working Turkish citizens,
                            > however few they are, slid towards the service group.
                            >
                            > Hey ! I was only trying to help and see where it got me :)))
                            >
                            > /Johnny
                          • lokeren93
                            Who can translate the following sentences: Flamenko gösterisi hem de en gerçeGinden karSImdaydI. and: Tarihle günümüz yaSamInIn tam bir uyumla iç içe
                            Message 13 of 16 , Apr 24, 2002
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                              Who can translate the following sentences:

                              Flamenko gösterisi hem de en gerçeGinden karSImdaydI.

                              and:

                              Tarihle günümüz yaSamInIn tam bir uyumla iç içe olduGu Barselona.....


                              çok teSekkür ederim

                              Jan Van der Stockt
                              Belgium
                            • Tulin Ozen
                              Selam , Bana göre tercumesi söyle olabilir; The Flemenko show ,which is the real original one,was just in front of me. ( My eyes) Here the person wants to
                              Message 14 of 16 , Apr 26, 2002
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                                Selam ,
                                Bana g�re tercumesi s�yle olabilir;
                                The Flemenko show ,which is the real original one,was
                                just in front of me. ( My eyes)
                                Here the person wants to emphasize the original
                                Spanish dance by the local people-I guess.
                                Digeri de s�yle;
                                Barcelona where history has mingled with our today's
                                world in a perfect harmony...
                                Iyi gunler umarim yararli olur size...
                                tulin �zen
                                --- lokeren93 <jan.vanderstockt@...> wrote:
                                > Who can translate the following sentences:
                                >
                                > Flamenko g�sterisi hem de en ger�eGinden
                                > karSImdaydI.
                                >
                                > and:
                                >
                                > Tarihle g�n�m�z yaSamInIn tam bir uyumla i� i�e
                                > olduGu Barselona.....
                                >
                                >
                                > �ok teSekk�r ederim
                                >
                                > Jan Van der Stockt
                                > Belgium
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >


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                              • lokeren93
                                -Thankyou very much for your translation Jan Van der Stockt Belgium
                                Message 15 of 16 , Apr 26, 2002
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                                  -Thankyou very much for your translation

                                  Jan Van der Stockt
                                  Belgium

                                  -- In turkishlearner@y..., Tulin Ozen <tulinozen2000@y...> wrote:
                                  > Selam ,
                                  > Bana göre tercumesi söyle olabilir;
                                  > The Flemenko show ,which is the real original one,was
                                  > just in front of me. ( My eyes)
                                  > Here the person wants to emphasize the original
                                  > Spanish dance by the local people-I guess.
                                  > Digeri de söyle;
                                  > Barcelona where history has mingled with our today's
                                  > world in a perfect harmony...
                                  > Iyi gunler umarim yararli olur size...
                                  > tulin Özen
                                  > --- lokeren93 <jan.vanderstockt@p...> wrote:
                                  > > Who can translate the following sentences:
                                  > >
                                  > > Flamenko gösterisi hem de en gerçeGinden
                                  > > karSImdaydI.
                                  > >
                                  > > and:
                                  > >
                                  > > Tarihle günümüz yaSamInIn tam bir uyumla iç içe
                                  > > olduGu Barselona.....
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > çok teSekkür ederim
                                  > >
                                  > > Jan Van der Stockt
                                  > > Belgium
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > __________________________________________________
                                  > Do You Yahoo!?
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