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x0x Braising Vegetables, a Turkish Delight

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    x0x Braising Vegetables, a Turkish Delight By JOHN WILLOUGHBY New York Times AMONG the culinary crimes committed by mid-20th-century American cooks, few were
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 4, 2011
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      x0x Braising Vegetables, a Turkish Delight

      By JOHN WILLOUGHBY

      New York Times

      AMONG the culinary crimes committed by mid-20th-century American cooks,
      few were more heinous than the long, slow torture administered to boiled
      vegetables: green beans cooked to a gray mush, zucchini so squishy it was
      barely recognizable, tomatoes .stewed. into a formless mass.

      But salvation did eventually come. In the wake of nouvelle cuisine.s
      pared-down aesthetic came the glory days of .crisp cooked. vegetables.
      Barely more than blanched, full of snap and bright flavor, they ushered in
      a new appreciation of the vegetable world, and their long-cooked cousins
      were banished to the scrap heap of culinary history.

      Or at least that.s what I thought until, on a visit to Istanbul, I was
      invited to dinner at a friend.s house. It was somewhat of an occasion,
      since the elderly man who had been his family.s cook in the early
      post-Ottoman days was preparing the meal.

      After elaborate mezze and a pitch-perfect version of the lamb and eggplant
      dish known as hunkar begendi, he brought out a dish of green beans. They
      violated every rule of modern cookery: not only had they obviously been
      .cooked to death,. as we all used to say about our mothers. vegetables,
      but they were also served at room temperature.

      And guess what? They were wholly delicious. Tender and succulent,
      complemented by the sweet acidity of tomatoes and the mellowed bite of
      onions, these long-cooked beans had a rich lushness that crisp vegetables
      could never approach. Rather than being boiled in roiling water, they were
      gently braised in olive oil (a substance restricted to the .pharmacy.
      aisle of supermarkets back in those bad old days).

      [Read the full article at:
      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/03/dining/braising-vegetables-a-turkish-delight.html
      ]

      Recipes

      Turkish-Style Braised Leeks (August 3, 2011)
      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/03/dining/turkish-style-braised-leeks-recipe.html?ref=dining

      Turkish-Style Braised Eggplant (August 3, 2011)
      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/03/dining/turkish-style-braised-eggplant-recipe.html?ref=dining

      Turkish-Style Braised Green Beans (August 3, 2011)
      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/03/dining/turkish-style-braised-green-beans-recipe.html?ref=dining
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