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x0x An Ancient City in Turkey Finds New Life in Modern Art

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    [Visited our store yet? http://www.TurkRadio.us/estore/ ] x0x An Ancient City in Turkey Finds New Life in Modern Art By ROBYN ECKHARDT Published: August 19,
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 23, 2010
      [Visited our store yet? http://www.TurkRadio.us/estore/ ]

      x0x An Ancient City in Turkey Finds New Life in Modern Art

      By ROBYN ECKHARDT

      Published: August 19, 2010

      ON a searingly hot Saturday in early June, a small crowd of residents and
      tourists stood inside the entryway of the 14th-century Zinciriye
      Medresesi, a mosque and former medrese, or center of Islamic study, in
      Mardin, an ancient town in southeastern Turkey. Hanging in a row on a wall
      beneath the narrow rooms vaulted ceiling were front pages from recent
      issues of Turkish, French and British newspapers. Each was missing a
      headline, and visitors took turns inscribing their own on strips of paper
      stacked beneath the display.

      "Obama, We Dont Need You", scrawled a teenage boy, commenting on recent
      friction between the Turkish and United States governments over Israels
      handling of the Gaza aid flotilla. "Antalya Doctors Arrive in Mardin!"
      wrote a smartly dressed medical conference attendee.

      "Mansetin", or "Your Headline", by the Turkish artist and graphic designer
      Hakan Irmak, was one of a number of works displayed at Zinciriye as part
      of the first Mardin Bienali this summer. Video, installations, paintings
      and photographs by 63 Turkish and international artists were exhibited in
      two medreseler, an abandoned mansion from the early 20th century, and the
      citys central square. The bienalis title, "Abbara Kadabara", was an
      allusion both to the arched stone passageways, or abbaralar, that link
      Mardins streets, and the almost magical surprise of cutting-edge art in a
      city steeped in history.


      Read the rest at:
      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/22/travel/22nextstop.html?emc=eta1
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