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Re: [turbocnc] Re: Old Computer Crashed

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  • Art Eckstein
    Sounds like: 1. You have a bad connection between the port, break out board, or driver 2. You have a bad pin on the parallel port (check using the DVM) 3.
    Message 1 of 30 , Apr 10, 2013
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      Sounds like:
      1. You have a bad connection between the port, break out board, or driver
      2. You have a bad pin on the parallel port (check using the DVM)
      3. Again, the dreaded 3V vs 5V parallel port problem
      4. A problem with the driver input circuit?

      Try moving to a different set of pin (example the ones used for the X
      axis and see if it repeats)
      Art
      Country Bubba


      At 04:45 PM 4/10/2013, you wrote:
      >Hey Guys,
      >Well I thought I was done debugging but I have another issue and not
      >too sure what it can be. As you know I got all my axises working by
      >enabling the parallel port in the bios....NOT AUTO. The problem is
      >that when I use either page up or page down to jog the Z axis they
      >both jog the z in the downwards direction??? I cannot get the z to
      >go back up? Any thoughts?
      >Rich
      >
      >
      >
      >--- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Smith" <ajsmith1968@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > I don't have a limit switches or homing switches set up on my
      > machine, Ive
      > > been
      > > > homing it by eye for way too long. Any suggestions on what type of
      > > accurate
      > > > homing/limit switches I should use and what pins I connected them too?
      > > How
      > > > are they wired up?
      > >
      > >
      > > Microswitches work well enough and are cheap, you want the ones with the
      > > little roller on the end of the lever. Like these:
      > > http://www.hobbyengineering.com/H1883.html
      > >
      > > You put those in a spot where the move bit hits the roller as it goes past
      > > and click the switch. Some people put them on the end but if it crashes it
      > > can damaged the switch (and so some people at rubber bumpers etc).
      > >
      > > You can also do optical switches, basically tiny versions of the
      > door chimes
      > > that trigger when you walk past them, and proximity switches that work like
      > > little metal detectors.
      > >
      > > The last two need to be powered to work, and require a bit of electronics
      > > fiddling. The switches are simple - they're just a switch so you wire them
      > > straight in.
      > >
      > > You can get away with using the limit switches as homing switches, most
      > > people do that.
      > >
      > > Tony
      > >
    • Bruce
      Haven t used turbo CNC for many years, but they all work pretty much the same. You have 2 #s for each axis X could be in # 3 and out is #4 . Y is #5 and
      Message 2 of 30 , Apr 11, 2013
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        Haven't used turbo CNC for many years, but they all work
        pretty much the same. You have 2 #s for each axis "X" could be
        in # 3 and out is #4 ." Y" is #5 and # 6 . "Z" would be # 7 and # 8.
        Beyond that you could have a board or wire shorted out.
        Check all your set up #s.
        Bruce


        On 4/10/2013 4:45 PM, rdstillw wrote:
        >
        > Hey Guys,
        > Well I thought I was done debugging but I have another issue and not
        > too sure what it can be. As you know I got all my axises working by
        > enabling the parallel port in the bios....NOT AUTO. The problem is and
        > that when I use either page up or page down to jog the Z axis they
        > both jog the z in the downwards direction??? I cannot get the z to go
        > back up? Any thoughts?
        > Rich
        >
        > --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com <mailto:turbocnc%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > "Tony Smith" <ajsmith1968@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > I don't have a limit switches or homing switches set up on my
        > machine, Ive
        > > been
        > > > homing it by eye for way too long. Any suggestions on what type of
        > > accurate
        > > > homing/limit switches I should use and what pins I connected them too?
        > > How
        > > > are they wired up?
        > >
        > >
        > > Microswitches work well enough and are cheap, you want the ones with the
        > > little roller on the end of the lever. Like these:
        > > http://www.hobbyengineering.com/H1883.html
        > >
        > > You put those in a spot where the move bit hits the roller as it
        > goes past
        > > and click the switch. Some people put them on the end but if it
        > crashes it
        > > can damaged the switch (and so some people at rubber bumpers etc).
        > >
        > > You can also do optical switches, basically tiny versions of the
        > door chimes
        > > that trigger when you walk past them, and proximity switches that
        > work like
        > > little metal detectors.
        > >
        > > The last two need to be powered to work, and require a bit of
        > electronics
        > > fiddling. The switches are simple - they're just a switch so you
        > wire them
        > > straight in.
        > >
        > > You can get away with using the limit switches as homing switches, most
        > > people do that.
        > >
        > > Tony
        > >
        >
        >



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