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threading - a theoretical question

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  • dan pines
    hi all, assuming that it is possible to make the spindle turn at a constant speed, is there a way to specify this speed to the threading gcodes instead of
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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      hi all,

      assuming that it is possible to make the spindle turn at a constant
      speed, is there a way to specify this speed to the threading gcodes
      instead of using the signal from a speed sensor on the spindle?

      simple juicers have sturdy gear motors which keep slow and constant
      speed even under the massive force used to press the fruit into the
      juicer. with such a motor linked to the spindle threading would be a
      breeze, provided the speed can be entered into TCNC.

      thanks
      dan
    • Paul Kelly
      It probably is possible Dan. But a one pulse per rev encoder is a very simple thing. I use a proximity probe and a little bit of steel held on with a hose
      Message 2 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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        It probably is possible Dan. But a one pulse per rev encoder is a very
        simple thing. I use a proximity probe and a little bit of steel held on with
        a hose clamp.

        PK

        -----Original Message-----
        From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of dan pines
        Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2005 8:42 PM
        To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [turbocnc] threading - a theoretical question

        hi all,

        assuming that it is possible to make the spindle turn at a constant
        speed, is there a way to specify this speed to the threading gcodes
        instead of using the signal from a speed sensor on the spindle?

        simple juicers have sturdy gear motors which keep slow and constant
        speed even under the massive force used to press the fruit into the
        juicer. with such a motor linked to the spindle threading would be a
        breeze, provided the speed can be entered into TCNC.

        thanks
        dan












        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • dan pines
        Paul it is not the sensor but the system behind it. my electronics knowhow=zero and although i have seen several references to the very low cost of components
        Message 3 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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          Paul

          it is not the sensor but the system behind it. my electronics
          knowhow=zero and although i have seen several references to the very
          low cost of components to make a sensor system, nobody sells them at
          a low price.

          so either i find someone to build it for me at a reasonable price or
          i find a way around it or i give up.

          regards
          dan


          --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Kelly" <tech@c...> wrote:
          >
          > It probably is possible Dan. But a one pulse per rev encoder is a
          very
          > simple thing. I use a proximity probe and a little bit of steel
          held on with
          > a hose clamp.
          >
          > PK
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf
          > Of dan pines
          > Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2005 8:42 PM
          > To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [turbocnc] threading - a theoretical question
          >
          > hi all,
          >
          > assuming that it is possible to make the spindle turn at a constant
          > speed, is there a way to specify this speed to the threading gcodes
          > instead of using the signal from a speed sensor on the spindle?
          >
          > simple juicers have sturdy gear motors which keep slow and
          constant
          > speed even under the massive force used to press the fruit into the
          > juicer. with such a motor linked to the spindle threading would be
          a
          > breeze, provided the speed can be entered into TCNC.
          >
          > thanks
          > dan
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
        • Paul Kelly
          No electronics. If you use a prox probe you hook one wire up to 12V, one wire to earth and one to the pin on the breakout board. PK ... From:
          Message 4 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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            No electronics. If you use a prox probe you hook one wire up to 12V, one
            wire to earth and one to the pin on the breakout board.

            PK

            -----Original Message-----
            From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Of dan pines
            Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2005 9:11 PM
            To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [turbocnc] Re: threading - a theoretical question

            Paul

            it is not the sensor but the system behind it. my electronics
            knowhow=zero and although i have seen several references to the very
            low cost of components to make a sensor system, nobody sells them at
            a low price.

            so either i find someone to build it for me at a reasonable price or
            i find a way around it or i give up.

            regards
            dan


            --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Kelly" <tech@c...> wrote:
            >
            > It probably is possible Dan. But a one pulse per rev encoder is a
            very
            > simple thing. I use a proximity probe and a little bit of steel
            held on with
            > a hose clamp.
            >
            > PK
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf
            > Of dan pines
            > Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2005 8:42 PM
            > To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [turbocnc] threading - a theoretical question
            >
            > hi all,
            >
            > assuming that it is possible to make the spindle turn at a constant
            > speed, is there a way to specify this speed to the threading gcodes
            > instead of using the signal from a speed sensor on the spindle?
            >
            > simple juicers have sturdy gear motors which keep slow and
            constant
            > speed even under the massive force used to press the fruit into the
            > juicer. with such a motor linked to the spindle threading would be
            a
            > breeze, provided the speed can be entered into TCNC.
            >
            > thanks
            > dan
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >











            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • dan pines
            Paul that sounds interesting. would you care to elaborate? i always thought that the parallel port takes 5v as a signal. will 12v not fry it? i do not use a
            Message 5 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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              Paul

              that sounds interesting. would you care to elaborate? i always
              thought that the parallel port takes 5v as a signal. will 12v not fry
              it? i do not use a breakout board, the controllers are wired directly
              to the pc port.
              i have somewhere a magnet type proximity switch. is this the type you
              use? i use a sherline lathe. were did you place the piece of steel,
              is it on the pulley? any info, or perhaps a photo would be welcome.

              thanks
              dan

              --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Kelly" <tech@c...> wrote:
              >
              > No electronics. If you use a prox probe you hook one wire up to
              12V, one
              > wire to earth and one to the pin on the breakout board.
              >
              > PK
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf
              > Of dan pines
              > Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2005 9:11 PM
              > To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [turbocnc] Re: threading - a theoretical question
              >
              > Paul
              >
              > it is not the sensor but the system behind it. my electronics
              > knowhow=zero and although i have seen several references to the
              very
              > low cost of components to make a sensor system, nobody sells them
              at
              > a low price.
              >
              > so either i find someone to build it for me at a reasonable price
              or
              > i find a way around it or i give up.
              >
              > regards
              > dan
              >
              >
              > --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Kelly" <tech@c...> wrote:
              > >
              > > It probably is possible Dan. But a one pulse per rev encoder is a
              > very
              > > simple thing. I use a proximity probe and a little bit of steel
              > held on with
              > > a hose clamp.
              > >
              > > PK
              > >
              > > -----Original Message-----
              > > From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com]
              On
              > Behalf
              > > Of dan pines
              > > Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2005 8:42 PM
              > > To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
              > > Subject: [turbocnc] threading - a theoretical question
              > >
              > > hi all,
              > >
              > > assuming that it is possible to make the spindle turn at a
              constant
              > > speed, is there a way to specify this speed to the threading
              gcodes
              > > instead of using the signal from a speed sensor on the spindle?
              > >
              > > simple juicers have sturdy gear motors which keep slow and
              > constant
              > > speed even under the massive force used to press the fruit into
              the
              > > juicer. with such a motor linked to the spindle threading would
              be
              > a
              > > breeze, provided the speed can be entered into TCNC.
              > >
              > > thanks
              > > dan
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
            • Paul Kelly
              OK, So you are using drives with built in optoisolators like Geko s? Opto isolating your IO is a good thing to do. But it gets surprisingly complex very
              Message 6 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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                OK, So you are using drives with built in optoisolators like Geko's?

                Opto isolating your IO is a good thing to do. But it gets surprisingly
                complex very quickly.. I think I have about 4 power supply rails in my lathe
                set up...

                Anyhow, time for some specifics:
                A three wire "npn" inductive proximity switch will generally require 12-24V
                on one wire. You would take 12V from a yellow wire from your power supply
                via a spare disk drive connector.

                A second wire on the prox goes to earth, connect this to pins 18-25 on the
                parallel port (all of these should be grounded).

                A the third wire goes to one of the input pins 1,10,11,12 etc..
                The reason this doesn't damage anything is because the output of an "npn"
                prox is a transistor that pulls the output wire to ground.

                There are "pnp" types too. Probably just as common. These will pull the
                output wire up to the supply voltage, and may well damage your parallel
                port.

                There are a few generalisations in the above, here's another one; as a rule,
                smaller diameter proxes have shorter sensing ranges. The 8mm diameter probe
                I used will sense a metal object when it is 2mm away.

                Prox probes are nearly always sealed and have threaded bodies. Very easy to
                install! Most also have a light that comes on when they trigger too.

                They come up on ebay periodically, I pay about US$5-US$20 each for them..
                MUCH easier than hall effect or photo interrupter setups.

                PK

                -----Original Message-----
                From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                Of dan pines
                Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2005 9:39 PM
                To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [turbocnc] Re: threading - a theoretical question

                Paul

                that sounds interesting. would you care to elaborate? i always
                thought that the parallel port takes 5v as a signal. will 12v not fry
                it? i do not use a breakout board, the controllers are wired directly
                to the pc port.
                i have somewhere a magnet type proximity switch. is this the type you
                use? i use a sherline lathe. were did you place the piece of steel,
                is it on the pulley? any info, or perhaps a photo would be welcome.

                thanks
                dan

                --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Kelly" <tech@c...> wrote:
                >
                > No electronics. If you use a prox probe you hook one wire up to
                12V, one
                > wire to earth and one to the pin on the breakout board.
                >
                > PK
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf
                > Of dan pines
                > Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2005 9:11 PM
                > To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [turbocnc] Re: threading - a theoretical question
                >
                > Paul
                >
                > it is not the sensor but the system behind it. my electronics
                > knowhow=zero and although i have seen several references to the
                very
                > low cost of components to make a sensor system, nobody sells them
                at
                > a low price.
                >
                > so either i find someone to build it for me at a reasonable price
                or
                > i find a way around it or i give up.
                >
                > regards
                > dan
                >
                >
                > --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Kelly" <tech@c...> wrote:
                > >
                > > It probably is possible Dan. But a one pulse per rev encoder is a
                > very
                > > simple thing. I use a proximity probe and a little bit of steel
                > held on with
                > > a hose clamp.
                > >
                > > PK
                > >
                > > -----Original Message-----
                > > From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com]
                On
                > Behalf
                > > Of dan pines
                > > Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2005 8:42 PM
                > > To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
                > > Subject: [turbocnc] threading - a theoretical question
                > >
                > > hi all,
                > >
                > > assuming that it is possible to make the spindle turn at a
                constant
                > > speed, is there a way to specify this speed to the threading
                gcodes
                > > instead of using the signal from a speed sensor on the spindle?
                > >
                > > simple juicers have sturdy gear motors which keep slow and
                > constant
                > > speed even under the massive force used to press the fruit into
                the
                > > juicer. with such a motor linked to the spindle threading would
                be
                > a
                > > breeze, provided the speed can be entered into TCNC.
                > >
                > > thanks
                > > dan
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >










                Yahoo! Groups Links
              • Alan Marconett
                Hi Dan, It might be a little messy, what with all that fruit! Seriously, it s probably just easier to make up a sensor. Need a schematic? Parts? Ideas?
                Message 7 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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                  Hi Dan,

                  It might be a little messy, what with all that fruit! Seriously, it's
                  probably just easier to make up a sensor. Need a schematic? Parts? Ideas?

                  You'd have to first determine the exact speed, and that's probably more work
                  then "sensing" it. Then an interrupt would have to be set up at the SAME
                  rate to substituted for the polled (I believe) sensor "true" signal that
                  would normally come from an I/O pin.

                  You could rig a 555 timer to simulate the sensor signal (which would
                  probably never be accurate enough). Or add a sensor earlier in the gear
                  train, and divide it down. Maybe divide it down from 60 Hz?

                  Ever see the stroboscopic effect on a synchronous motor (like a fan blade),
                  when a little extra load is put on it? The blades start to slowly rotate.
                  That would KILL a screw thread!

                  Alan KM6VV


                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  > Of dan pines
                  > Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2005 4:42 AM
                  > To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [turbocnc] threading - a theoretical question
                  >
                  > hi all,
                  >
                  > assuming that it is possible to make the spindle turn at a constant
                  > speed, is there a way to specify this speed to the threading gcodes
                  > instead of using the signal from a speed sensor on the spindle?
                  >
                  > simple juicers have sturdy gear motors which keep slow and constant
                  > speed even under the massive force used to press the fruit into the
                  > juicer. with such a motor linked to the spindle threading would be a
                  > breeze, provided the speed can be entered into TCNC.
                  >
                  > thanks
                  > dan
                  >
                  >
                • t.horton@lineone.net
                  could you use a magnetic pickup from a push bike computer? ,the type you attatch to the front forks and then screw a magnet to the spokes? cos there cheap!
                  Message 8 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    could you use a magnetic pickup from a push bike computer?
                    ,the type you attatch to the front forks and then screw a magnet to the spokes?
                    cos there cheap!
                    Tony Horton



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                  • dan pines
                    Paul i think i understand it. clearly it is not like the magnetic switch i planned to use. could you give me a brand/part number? i will try to find one in
                    Message 9 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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                      Paul

                      i think i understand it. clearly it is not like the magnetic switch i
                      planned to use. could you give me a brand/part number? i will try to
                      find one in israel.

                      thanks
                      dan

                      --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Kelly" <tech@c...> wrote:
                      >
                      > OK, So you are using drives with built in optoisolators like Geko's?
                      >
                      > Opto isolating your IO is a good thing to do. But it gets
                      surprisingly
                      > complex very quickly.. I think I have about 4 power supply rails in
                      my lathe
                      > set up...
                      >
                      > Anyhow, time for some specifics:
                      > A three wire "npn" inductive proximity switch will generally
                      require 12-24V
                      > on one wire. You would take 12V from a yellow wire from your power
                      supply
                      > via a spare disk drive connector.
                      >
                      > A second wire on the prox goes to earth, connect this to pins 18-25
                      on the
                      > parallel port (all of these should be grounded).
                      >
                      > A the third wire goes to one of the input pins 1,10,11,12 etc..
                      > The reason this doesn't damage anything is because the output of
                      an "npn"
                      > prox is a transistor that pulls the output wire to ground.
                      >
                      > There are "pnp" types too. Probably just as common. These will pull
                      the
                      > output wire up to the supply voltage, and may well damage your
                      parallel
                      > port.
                      >
                      > There are a few generalisations in the above, here's another one;
                      as a rule,
                      > smaller diameter proxes have shorter sensing ranges. The 8mm
                      diameter probe
                      > I used will sense a metal object when it is 2mm away.
                      >
                      > Prox probes are nearly always sealed and have threaded bodies. Very
                      easy to
                      > install! Most also have a light that comes on when they trigger too.
                      >
                      > They come up on ebay periodically, I pay about US$5-US$20 each for
                      them..
                      > MUCH easier than hall effect or photo interrupter setups.
                      >
                      > PK
                      >
                    • dan pines
                      Alan seriously, i wouldn t recognize a 555 if it hit me in the face unless it had the number on it in bold letters. even then i wouldn t know what to do with
                      Message 10 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Alan

                        seriously, i wouldn't recognize a 555 if it hit me in the face unless
                        it had the number on it in bold letters. even then i wouldn't know
                        what to do with it.

                        i did not mean that i wanted to "cheat" TCNC by sending a signal
                        stream to correspond to the actual fixed speed. i wondered if there
                        was a way to enter the fixed speed as a parameter (like the "f" speed)
                        and do away with the need to supply an index signal.

                        anyway, i may try out what paul suggested.

                        not knowing enough is definitely frustrating at times. however, the
                        best i can do at the moment is solder things together according to
                        clear instructions. i will search for a kit to be bought although i
                        doubt that one exists. if you know of one, please let me know.

                        thanks
                        dan

                        --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Alan Marconett" <KM6VV@a...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Dan,
                        >
                        > It might be a little messy, what with all that fruit! Seriously,
                        it's
                        > probably just easier to make up a sensor. Need a schematic?
                        Parts? Ideas?
                        >
                        > You'd have to first determine the exact speed, and that's probably
                        more work
                        > then "sensing" it. Then an interrupt would have to be set up at
                        the SAME
                        > rate to substituted for the polled (I believe) sensor "true" signal
                        that
                        > would normally come from an I/O pin.
                        >
                        > You could rig a 555 timer to simulate the sensor signal (which would
                        > probably never be accurate enough). Or add a sensor earlier in the
                        gear
                        > train, and divide it down. Maybe divide it down from 60 Hz?
                        >
                        > Ever see the stroboscopic effect on a synchronous motor (like a fan
                        blade),
                        > when a little extra load is put on it? The blades start to slowly
                        rotate.
                        > That would KILL a screw thread!
                        >
                        > Alan KM6VV
                        >
                        >
                        > > -----Original Message-----
                        > > From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com]
                        On Behalf
                        > > Of dan pines
                        > > Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2005 4:42 AM
                        > > To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
                        > > Subject: [turbocnc] threading - a theoretical question
                        > >
                        > > hi all,
                        > >
                        > > assuming that it is possible to make the spindle turn at a
                        constant
                        > > speed, is there a way to specify this speed to the threading
                        gcodes
                        > > instead of using the signal from a speed sensor on the spindle?
                        > >
                        > > simple juicers have sturdy gear motors which keep slow and
                        constant
                        > > speed even under the massive force used to press the fruit into
                        the
                        > > juicer. with such a motor linked to the spindle threading would
                        be a
                        > > breeze, provided the speed can be entered into TCNC.
                        > >
                        > > thanks
                        > > dan
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • Alan Marconett
                        Hi Dan, I am proposing a little optical tach circuit. I use it as input for a PIC tach a built. I ve attached a JPG; it will probably get stripped off for
                        Message 11 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hi Dan,

                          I am proposing a little optical tach circuit. I use it as input for a PIC
                          tach a built. I've attached a JPG; it will probably get stripped off for
                          the list. Pardon my hand sketch! I can send you parts, if you want (even a
                          better schematic). I might even be inclined to WIRE it for you (Holiday
                          Spirit?).

                          The circuit uses a simple Fairchild QRB1134 reflective optical sensor, and a
                          transistor. Dave H., I believe, also has a circuit.

                          I understood what you meant by "setting" a spindle speed, but alas, there is
                          no way. And even if you could, I don't believe you could measure the speed
                          accurately enough, or the program could "use" it accurately enough. The
                          "accumulated error" would get you (the blade would slowly drift). It's a
                          "SYNC" of the spindle that we want, which would be accurate (or at least a
                          constant offset) to a POSITION on the spindle; not it's absolute speed.
                          Thus, we need a "sync pulse" to do the job.

                          Paul's sensor would seem to be a good choice. I'd like to know the part# as
                          well. I've also played with some hall-effect sensors; they are often used
                          in I.C. engines as ignition sensors.

                          Alan KM6VV


                          > -----Original Message-----
                          > From: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:turbocnc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                          > Of dan pines
                          > Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2005 9:52 AM
                          > To: turbocnc@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: [turbocnc] Re: threading - a theoretical question
                          >
                          > Alan
                          >
                          > seriously, i wouldn't recognize a 555 if it hit me in the face unless
                          > it had the number on it in bold letters. even then i wouldn't know
                          > what to do with it.
                          >
                          > i did not mean that i wanted to "cheat" TCNC by sending a signal
                          > stream to correspond to the actual fixed speed. i wondered if there
                          > was a way to enter the fixed speed as a parameter (like the "f" speed)
                          > and do away with the need to supply an index signal.
                          >
                          > anyway, i may try out what paul suggested.
                          >
                          > not knowing enough is definitely frustrating at times. however, the
                          > best i can do at the moment is solder things together according to
                          > clear instructions. i will search for a kit to be bought although i
                          > doubt that one exists. if you know of one, please let me know.
                          >
                          > thanks
                          > dan
                          >
                          > --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "Alan Marconett" <KM6VV@a...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hi Dan,
                          > >
                          > > It might be a little messy, what with all that fruit! Seriously,
                          > it's
                          > > probably just easier to make up a sensor. Need a schematic?
                          > Parts? Ideas?
                          > >
                          > > You'd have to first determine the exact speed, and that's probably
                          > more work
                          > > then "sensing" it. Then an interrupt would have to be set up at
                          > the SAME
                          > > rate to substituted for the polled (I believe) sensor "true" signal
                          > that
                          > > would normally come from an I/O pin.
                          > >
                          > > You could rig a 555 timer to simulate the sensor signal (which would
                          > > probably never be accurate enough). Or add a sensor earlier in the
                          > gear
                          > > train, and divide it down. Maybe divide it down from 60 Hz?
                          > >
                          > > Ever see the stroboscopic effect on a synchronous motor (like a fan
                          > blade),
                          > > when a little extra load is put on it? The blades start to slowly
                          > rotate.
                          > > That would KILL a screw thread!
                          > >
                          > > Alan KM6VV
                          > >



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • rotarysmp
                          A Sharp GP1A05 is an optical gate with all the driving electronics built in. It has three pins +5V, Signal out and Ground.
                          Message 12 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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                            A Sharp GP1A05 is an optical gate with all the driving electronics
                            built in. It has three pins +5V, Signal out and Ground.

                            http://www.wrathall.com/Interests/CNC_conversion/spindle_encoder.htm

                            Regards,
                            Mark.
                          • dan pines
                            Mark thanks dan
                            Message 13 of 14 , Dec 2, 2005
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                              Mark

                              thanks

                              dan

                              --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, "rotarysmp" <mark.wrathall@a...> wrote:
                              >
                              > A Sharp GP1A05 is an optical gate with all the driving electronics
                              > built in. It has three pins +5V, Signal out and Ground.
                              >
                              > http://www.wrathall.com/Interests/CNC_conversion/spindle_encoder.htm
                              >
                              > Regards,
                              > Mark.
                              >
                            • dan pines
                              Tony will look into this option. thanks dan ... the spokes? ... Christmas microsite.
                              Message 14 of 14 , Dec 2, 2005
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                                Tony

                                will look into this option.

                                thanks
                                dan

                                --- In turbocnc@yahoogroups.com, t.horton@l... wrote:
                                >
                                > could you use a magnetic pickup from a push bike computer?
                                > ,the type you attatch to the front forks and then screw a magnet to
                                the spokes?
                                > cos there cheap!
                                > Tony Horton
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > ___________________________________________________________
                                >
                                > Tiscali Broadband from 14.99 with free setup!
                                > http://www.tiscali.co.uk/products/broadband/
                                >
                                > Christmas gift ideas and festive features - visit the Tiscali
                                Christmas microsite.
                                > http://www.tiscali.co.uk/christmas
                                >
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