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Re: inharmonicity paper etc.

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  • Jack
    ... Claro. A very reasonable theoretical suggestion, Carl. There are these branch points where I could move into experimental areas where I either work with
    Message 1 of 96 , Dec 1, 2008
      --- In tuning@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Lumma" <carl@...> wrote:
      > --- In tuning@yahoogroups.com, "Jack" <gvr.jack@> wrote:
      > > And then that opens another can of worms. ... (No, I have no
      > > plans to go fretless any time soon.)

      > Don't forget the other option -- fanned frets. -Carl

      Claro. A very reasonable theoretical suggestion, Carl.
      There are these branch points where I could move into experimental
      areas where I either work with funky instruments that I have adapted
      myself, or expensive custom jobs like Paul Galbraith's fanned-fret 8
      string (if I wanted what I might consider to be a professional
      instrument). Were I experimentally driven, as I think many of the
      microtonalists are, then I would passionately pursue those avenues
      without regard for practical commercial application.

      My interest in playing "in tune" is bound by my limiting assumptions
      about commercial applicability. (Yeah, yeah, how bourgeois.) So for
      commercial and artistic marketability, I want to play "in tune" on a
      fairly conventional instrument. That's made a little more complex by
      NOT having the assumption that 12-ET is the best model. (Why I
      dislike playing with keyboard players generally, at least of the
      usual stripe.) We (my duo partner and I) have made major steps
      forward by finding better strings than the usual, and a nice matched
      set of work guitars that are very loud and sweet, for our un-
      amplified act in a hotel restaurant.

      Naturally I'm aware that the convention of 12 frets per octave is
      extremely limiting, particularly in the upper registers where there
      are potential "microtonal" (what a clumsy word, so conditioned by
      19th century 12-ET assumptions, no?) upper extensions to chords that
      are very attractive... but as I say, that's a whole 'nother can of
      worms. Maybe I should just have a chromatic set of jaw harps.

      I had a luthier set up one of my guitars a few years ago with his own
      system of "just intonation" as he conceived it. Great, but it would
      only play in D. Disaster otherwise. I'm doing much better with my own
      experiments. Talking to you guys on this list, and reading about all
      of the various other issues that you are into (many of which don't
      have direct application for me) is definitely feeding my own process,
      and I appreciate it.
    • clumma
      Actually, this is about an injection molded component , not strings. -Carl
      Message 96 of 96 , Mar 10, 2016
        Actually, this is about an injection molded "component", not strings.

        -Carl
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