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More storms batter UK

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  • jeremyrogers2003
    1st February 2002 Following excerpt taken from BBC website; Gale-force winds of over 80 miles per hour are battering western areas of the British Isles, with
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 1, 2002
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      1st February 2002

      Following excerpt taken from BBC website;

      Gale-force winds of over 80 miles per hour are battering western
      areas of the British Isles, with more storms forecast for the
      weekend.
      About 300 homes in Northern Ireland are without electricity, and
      power-lines were also brought down in Argyll and on the Isle of Skye.

      There is also a danger of coastal flooding in Devon and Cornwall.

      Forecasters say the winds will abate by Sunday but downpours could
      cause flooding and the wet weather is expected to continue into next
      week.

      Police have issued a warning to motorists following the death of two
      men on Thursday when a tree fell on their car near Huddersfield in
      West Yorkshire.
      -------------------------------------------------------------------

      Jeremy
    • Michael L Cunningham
      ... Here are some more interesting weather facts gleaned from the National Climatic Data Center, NOAA in Asheville, NC with data available to the public. 1990
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 1, 2002
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        At 12:44 PM 2/1/2002 +0000, you wrote:
        >1st February 2002
        >
        >Following excerpt taken from BBC website;
        >
        >Gale-force winds of over 80 miles per hour are battering western
        >areas of the British Isles, with more storms forecast for the
        >weekend.
        >About 300 homes in Northern Ireland are without electricity, and
        >power-lines were also brought down in Argyll and on the Isle of Skye.
        >
        >There is also a danger of coastal flooding in Devon and Cornwall.
        >
        >Forecasters say the winds will abate by Sunday but downpours could
        >cause flooding and the wet weather is expected to continue into next
        >week.
        >
        >Police have issued a warning to motorists following the death of two
        >men on Thursday when a tree fell on their car near Huddersfield in
        >West Yorkshire.

        Here are some more interesting weather facts gleaned from the
        National Climatic Data Center, NOAA in Asheville, NC with data
        available to the public.

        1990 (Feb 3rf-4th) Third monster storm in 1.5 weeks raked Northern
        Europe. 23 killed in France by high winds, Eiffel Tower swayed in
        gusts to 115 mph. winds uprooted oaks & statues at Versailles
        Palace. 7 die in Germany as thousands of trees were uprooted.

        1985 (Feb 24th) Heat records set across the Northeast and New
        England. Among the 12 records for all-time February heat were
        75 deg at New York, NY; 73 deg at Hartford, CT; and 70 deg at
        Boston, MA.

        1962 (Feb. 20th) Winter storm on Maui with winds to 60 mph
        dumped 8 inches of snow above the 8000 ft mark. Temperatures
        of 55 deg (21st) and 56 deg (22nd) set daily low record at
        Honolulu.

        1894 (Mar 17th) Today's 80 deg high in Sioux Falls, SD (a record
        for the date, and until the 7th in 2000, the earliest 80 deg on record)
        was offset by the -4 deg record low on Mar 25th/26th.

        I'll look for some more old and interesting facts for posting.
      • jeremyrogers2003
        What s notable about these recent strong winds (or virtual hurricanes I should say) is that they are SUSTAINED over several days. We had a famous one-off
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 1, 2002
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          What's notable about these recent strong winds (or virtual hurricanes
          I should say) is that they are SUSTAINED over several days.

          We had a famous one-off hurricane in Britain in October 1987, but
          that occurred within one night. I have never recalled such strong
          winds recurring with increasing frequency in my life here in England.

          Stats of past weather extremes are all very well but upon closer
          examination they tend to be isolated freak incidents. What we are
          seeing now is a very definite
          sustained uptick in weather extremes right across the world.


          Jeremy
        • Michael L Cunningham
          ... And what do you attribute this to?
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 1, 2002
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            At 03:47 PM 2/1/2002 +0000, you wrote:
            >What's notable about these recent strong winds (or virtual hurricanes
            >I should say) is that they are SUSTAINED over several days.
            >
            >We had a famous one-off hurricane in Britain in October 1987, but
            >that occurred within one night. I have never recalled such strong
            >winds recurring with increasing frequency in my life here in England.
            >
            >Stats of past weather extremes are all very well but upon closer
            >examination they tend to be isolated freak incidents. What we are
            >seeing now is a very definite
            >sustained uptick in weather extremes right across the world.
            >
            >
            >Jeremy

            And what do you attribute this to?
          • jeremyrogers2003
            ... hurricanes ... England. ... I m not a meterologist, but I admit that I seriously accept the impending pole shift as predicted by the Zetas. The Zetas say
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 1, 2002
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              --- In tt-watch@y..., Michael L Cunningham <bogeystar@e...> wrote:
              > At 03:47 PM 2/1/2002 +0000, you wrote:
              > >What's notable about these recent strong winds (or virtual
              hurricanes
              > >I should say) is that they are SUSTAINED over several days.
              > >
              > >We had a famous one-off hurricane in Britain in October 1987, but
              > >that occurred within one night. I have never recalled such strong
              > >winds recurring with increasing frequency in my life here in
              England.
              > >
              > >Stats of past weather extremes are all very well but upon closer
              > >examination they tend to be isolated freak incidents. What we are
              > >seeing now is a very definite
              > >sustained uptick in weather extremes right across the world.
              > >
              > >
              > >Jeremy
              >
              > And what do you attribute this to?


              I'm not a meterologist, but I admit that I seriously accept the
              impending pole shift as predicted by the Zetas. The Zetas say the
              weather changes are largely caused by the heating of the worlds oceans
              as an effect of increased activity in the earths core. I can't go
              into all the meterological science that follows from that,as I would
              have to do more extensive research. There are numerous variables in
              determining weather patterns (which is why supercomputers are often
              used for weather forecasting) so I suppose it is plausible that only
              a few have to be adjusted to invoke a major change.

              Anyway, regardless whether I believe or not, these global weather
              changes are being recognised and talked about by ordinary people who
              have no awareness of ZetaTalk, or pole shifts.

              Jeremy
            • Michael L Cunningham
              ... Not attacking your belief Jeremy. What other evidence have you looked at that these weather related events could be attributed to? Global warming? Ocean
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 1, 2002
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                At 05:26 PM 2/1/2002 +0000, you wrote:

                >I'm not a meterologist, but I admit that I seriously accept the
                >impending pole shift as predicted by the Zetas. The Zetas say the
                >weather changes are largely caused by the heating of the worlds oceans
                >as an effect of increased activity in the earths core. I can't go
                >into all the meterological science that follows from that,as I would
                >have to do more extensive research. There are numerous variables in
                >determining weather patterns (which is why supercomputers are often
                >used for weather forecasting) so I suppose it is plausible that only
                >a few have to be adjusted to invoke a major change.
                >
                >Anyway, regardless whether I believe or not, these global weather
                >changes are being recognised and talked about by ordinary people who
                >have no awareness of ZetaTalk, or pole shifts.
                >
                >Jeremy

                Not attacking your belief Jeremy.

                What other evidence have you looked at that these weather related
                events could be attributed to? Global warming? Ocean currents changing?
                The British Isles weather including Northern Europe's weather is directly
                related to the flow of the Gulf stream.
              • jeremyrogers2003
                ... oceans ... would ... only ... who ... changing? ... directly ... It seems the only theory that scientists can offer for global warming and weather changes
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 1, 2002
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                  --- In tt-watch@y..., Michael L Cunningham <bogeystar@e...> wrote:
                  > At 05:26 PM 2/1/2002 +0000, you wrote:
                  >
                  > >I'm not a meterologist, but I admit that I seriously accept the
                  > >impending pole shift as predicted by the Zetas. The Zetas say the
                  > >weather changes are largely caused by the heating of the worlds
                  oceans
                  > >as an effect of increased activity in the earths core. I can't go
                  > >into all the meterological science that follows from that,as I
                  would
                  > >have to do more extensive research. There are numerous variables in
                  > >determining weather patterns (which is why supercomputers are often
                  > >used for weather forecasting) so I suppose it is plausible that
                  only
                  > >a few have to be adjusted to invoke a major change.
                  > >
                  > >Anyway, regardless whether I believe or not, these global weather
                  > >changes are being recognised and talked about by ordinary people
                  who
                  > >have no awareness of ZetaTalk, or pole shifts.
                  > >
                  > >Jeremy
                  >
                  > Not attacking your belief Jeremy.
                  >
                  > What other evidence have you looked at that these weather related
                  > events could be attributed to? Global warming? Ocean currents
                  changing?
                  > The British Isles weather including Northern Europe's weather is
                  directly
                  > related to the flow of the Gulf stream.


                  It seems the only theory that scientists can offer
                  for global warming and weather changes is Co2 emissions, even though
                  there is no proof that weather changes are caused by man made C02
                  emissions. I personally feel if we were the cause then the sudden
                  changes in weather patterns would have been noticed long ago.
                  Also, the weather extremes are not just occurring here in Britain but
                  all over the world. Just look at the exceptionally warm North
                  American winter now, the broken rainfall record in Britain last year,
                  and the
                  heat records set in various parts of the world last year. All
                  this is evidence of a cause, but no one can pinpoint what the exact
                  cause(s) is. It is far too coincidental for me, however, that these
                  extremes are occurring simultaneously worldwide.

                  Changes don't happen for no particular reason. If we (that is
                  humanity) are not responsible then what is going on? The intensity
                  of rays from the sun hasn't altered as far as we know, as that is
                  surely a fact that could be easily verified. Changing ocean currents,
                  as you mentioned might possibly be a cause, and those currents in
                  turn may even be changing due to the warming oceans. In other words,
                  one effect leads to another, so it may prove hard to determine what
                  the root cause is.

                  Jeremy
                • geoff2000s
                  ... in ... often ... but ... year, ... currents, ... words, ... I agree with your last sentence. Weather and climate models are among the most complicated
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 1, 2002
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                    --- In tt-watch@y..., "jeremyrogers2003" <jeremy.rogers1@b...> wrote:
                    > --- In tt-watch@y..., Michael L Cunningham <bogeystar@e...> wrote:
                    > > At 05:26 PM 2/1/2002 +0000, you wrote:
                    > >
                    > > >I'm not a meterologist, but I admit that I seriously accept the
                    > > >impending pole shift as predicted by the Zetas. The Zetas say the
                    > > >weather changes are largely caused by the heating of the worlds
                    > oceans
                    > > >as an effect of increased activity in the earths core. I can't go
                    > > >into all the meterological science that follows from that,as I
                    > would
                    > > >have to do more extensive research. There are numerous variables
                    in
                    > > >determining weather patterns (which is why supercomputers are
                    often
                    > > >used for weather forecasting) so I suppose it is plausible that
                    > only
                    > > >a few have to be adjusted to invoke a major change.
                    > > >
                    > > >Anyway, regardless whether I believe or not, these global weather
                    > > >changes are being recognised and talked about by ordinary people
                    > who
                    > > >have no awareness of ZetaTalk, or pole shifts.
                    > > >
                    > > >Jeremy
                    > >
                    > > Not attacking your belief Jeremy.
                    > >
                    > > What other evidence have you looked at that these weather related
                    > > events could be attributed to? Global warming? Ocean currents
                    > changing?
                    > > The British Isles weather including Northern Europe's weather is
                    > directly
                    > > related to the flow of the Gulf stream.
                    >
                    >
                    > It seems the only theory that scientists can offer
                    > for global warming and weather changes is Co2 emissions, even though
                    > there is no proof that weather changes are caused by man made C02
                    > emissions. I personally feel if we were the cause then the sudden
                    > changes in weather patterns would have been noticed long ago.
                    > Also, the weather extremes are not just occurring here in Britain
                    but
                    > all over the world. Just look at the exceptionally warm North
                    > American winter now, the broken rainfall record in Britain last
                    year,
                    > and the
                    > heat records set in various parts of the world last year. All
                    > this is evidence of a cause, but no one can pinpoint what the exact
                    > cause(s) is. It is far too coincidental for me, however, that these
                    > extremes are occurring simultaneously worldwide.
                    >
                    > Changes don't happen for no particular reason. If we (that is
                    > humanity) are not responsible then what is going on? The intensity
                    > of rays from the sun hasn't altered as far as we know, as that is
                    > surely a fact that could be easily verified. Changing ocean
                    currents,
                    > as you mentioned might possibly be a cause, and those currents in
                    > turn may even be changing due to the warming oceans. In other
                    words,
                    > one effect leads to another, so it may prove hard to determine what
                    > the root cause is.
                    >
                    > Jeremy

                    I agree with your last sentence.

                    Weather and climate models are among the most complicated
                    types of computer programs. Pretty much everybody agrees
                    that forecasting weather and assessing climate are difficult
                    tasks, and it would currently be unreasonable to expect 100%
                    success in either endeavor. None of the climate models that are
                    used incorporate all of the factors which we know influence
                    the climate - we simply don't have enough good data or
                    computing power yet.

                    So, is there any good reason to attribute shortcomings in
                    climate evaluation to a planet that has no independent
                    for its existence? Or are the shortcomings just due to
                    the difficulty of the problem?

                    One other factor to consider is the accurary of weather
                    forecasts. We certainly are having unusual weather in many
                    locations, but is there any evidence that short-term
                    weather forecasts are less accurate than they were five
                    or ten years ago? If the weather was being influenced
                    by an unmodelled factor that was increasing in magnitude,
                    I would expect the accuracy of the forecasts to decline.
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