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Betelgeuse

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  • istari1357
    I have a question for all the talented amateur astronomers here. It is reputed and reported by scientific sources that the giant star Betelgeuse in the
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 9, 2011
      I have a question for all the talented amateur astronomers here. It is reputed and reported by scientific sources that the giant star Betelgeuse in the constellation of Orion is about to go supernova, one of the most violent things that can happen in this universe of ours... either this year, 2011... or next year 2012.

      If we can view this supernova explosion from earth, then that means that Betelgeuse the star has already exploded millions of years ago, right? Since looking out into space we are also looking back out into time... so IF Betelgeuse does go supernova, or rather has already gone supernova millions of years ago. how long would the shock wave take to effect the solar system, particularly the sun, and then effect earth?

      Would there be a giant wave of matter, debris and gamma particles flooding the solar system which could create cataclysmic upheaval and great change... particularly effecting the sun, OR would we just witness a weak "second sun" in the sky for a few months?

      http://scienceray.com/astronomy/apocalypse-soon-supernova-betelgeuse-is-coming/

      Istari

      PS Maybe I should ask Nancy and the Zetas too because they hail from the constellation of Orion. ;-)
    • Michael L Cunningham
      Go ahead and ask Nancy... she s a loon anyway. Betelgeuse is only 640 light years away... IF it exploded today, you wouldn t know it for 640 years. It might
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 11, 2011
        Go ahead and ask Nancy... she's a loon anyway.

        Betelgeuse is only 640 light years away... IF it exploded today, you
        wouldn't know it for 640 years. It might get fairly bright... brighter than
        Venus but not quite like a full moon.

        As for radiation... it will take a few hundred thousand years for the shock
        wave to reach the solar system as the wave doesn't move at the speed of
        light. Average speeds for shockwaves are around 12,000 miles per second at
        the initial blast slowing to 5,000 mile per second as the wave impacts
        interstellar gas and dust.

        Given that Betelgeuse isn't quite at the stage to go supernova, it's
        estimated to have about 10,000 years left before the blast... but we could
        be wrong.

        Michael L Cunningham

        -----Original Message-----
        From: tt-watch@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tt-watch@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of istari1357
        Sent: Friday, September 09, 2011 5:43 PM
        To: tt-watch@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [tt-watch] Betelgeuse

        I have a question for all the talented amateur astronomers here. It is
        reputed and reported by scientific sources that the giant star Betelgeuse in
        the constellation of Orion is about to go supernova, one of the most violent
        things that can happen in this universe of ours... either this year, 2011...
        or next year 2012.

        If we can view this supernova explosion from earth, then that means that
        Betelgeuse the star has already exploded millions of years ago, right? Since
        looking out into space we are also looking back out into time... so IF
        Betelgeuse does go supernova, or rather has already gone supernova millions
        of years ago. how long would the shock wave take to effect the solar system,
        particularly the sun, and then effect earth?

        Would there be a giant wave of matter, debris and gamma particles flooding
        the solar system which could create cataclysmic upheaval and great change...
        particularly effecting the sun, OR would we just witness a weak "second sun"
        in the sky for a few months?

        http://scienceray.com/astronomy/apocalypse-soon-supernova-betelgeuse-is-comi
        ng/

        Istari

        PS Maybe I should ask Nancy and the Zetas too because they hail from the
        constellation of Orion. ;-)



        ------------------------------------

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      • istari1357
        ... The Zetas have certainly gone very quiet lately! ... Ain t math and science fascinating. How much humanity has learned in recent centuries is astonishing.
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 11, 2011
          --- In tt-watch@yahoogroups.com, "Michael L Cunningham" <bogeystar@...> wrote:
          >
          > Go ahead and ask Nancy... she's a loon anyway.

          The Zetas have certainly gone very quiet lately!

          > Betelgeuse is only 640 light years away... IF it exploded today, you
          > wouldn't know it for 640 years. It might get fairly bright... brighter than
          > Venus but not quite like a full moon.
          >
          > As for radiation... it will take a few hundred thousand years for the shock
          > wave to reach the solar system as the wave doesn't move at the speed of
          > light. Average speeds for shockwaves are around 12,000 miles per second at
          > the initial blast slowing to 5,000 mile per second as the wave impacts
          > interstellar gas and dust.

          Ain't math and science fascinating. How much humanity has learned in recent centuries is astonishing. Knowledge has certainly increased.

          > Given that Betelgeuse isn't quite at the stage to go supernova, it's
          > estimated to have about 10,000 years left before the blast... but we could
          > be wrong.
          >
          > Michael L Cunningham

          Thanks Michael. That clears things up slightly.

          BTW Whatever you do, don't say "Betelgeuse" three times because the devil appear! ;-)

          Istari
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