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Re: [tt-watch] Last known tsunami to hit Europe was over 8,000 years ago

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  • Hap Griffin
    Hey franci...where s our explanation regarding the big bang post you made the other day...we re waiting. ;-))) Hap ... From: franci66
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 12, 2006
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      Hey franci...where's our explanation regarding the big bang post you made
      the other day...we're waiting.

      ;-)))

      Hap

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "franci66" <oshosananda@...>
      To: "tt-watch@" <tt-watch@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 12:40 PM
      Subject: [tt-watch] Last known tsunami to hit Europe was over 8,000 years
      ago


      > Study Sees North Sea Tsunami Risk
      > By Axel Bojanowski
      > The last known tsunami to hit Europe was over 8,000 years ago. But new
      > research reveals that there have been a number of deep-sea earthquakes
      > since
      > then, and that a landslide along the continental slopes could pose a
      > serious
      > risk to the cities and towns on the North Sea coast.
      > It was a catastrophe of apocalyptic proportions. An earthquake shook
      > Norway's coast between Bergen and Trondheim about 8,150 years ago. The
      > tremors ripped pieces of land the size of Iceland from shallow water and
      > sent them crashing into the deep sea. Like a stone thrown into a pond, the
      > landslide produced ripples of waves that spread at the speed of a train --
      > powerful tsunamis racing across the North Sea. Along the beaches of
      > Scotland
      > the waves were up to six meters (20 feet) high. Geologists have discovered
      > a
      > ravaged Stone-Age site there.
      > http://www.spiegel.de/international/0,1518,441819,00.html
      > ----------------------------------------
      > ZetaTalk: Wandering Poles
      > Note: written on Feb 15, 2002.
      > As we have stated in ZetaTalk, the prior shift moved the North Pole from
      > Greenland to its present location. Prior to that, it was over the East
      > Siberian Sea, having pulled Siberia northward where the largest number of
      > mammoth dieoff occurred. Tracing the North Pole over the past few shifts,
      > one sees that it spent a time over Scandinavia where it resided between
      > the
      > 4th and 5th shift back. When it moved from Scandinavia into the Arctic
      > north
      > of Siberia, Europe warmed up, its glaciers melting. Prior to Scandinavia,
      > the North Pole centered over North America.
      > http://www.zetatalk.com/poleshft/p146.htm
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
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