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Re: Shipping containers

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  • mlistman@ix.netcom.com
    Are you sure that would work? I was under the impression that the salt water was an important piece of the puzzle, as this is a protection based on the
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 1, 2001
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      Are you sure that would work? I was under the impression that the
      salt water was an important piece of the puzzle, as this is a
      protection based on the electric properties of the metals.

      Michael Listman

      --- In tt-forum@y..., MikeL <mikelob@g...> wrote:
      >
      > Pick up some Zinc bars and place them in the ground with a heavy
      wire
      > running to the container. This will minimize rusting. Marine
      supplies
      > have these sort of items. They use them in salt water and with
      boats to
      > minimize corrosion and rust.
      >
      > MikeL
    • MikeL
      Salt is not needed for this to work. Works because it makes a low voltage battery with a steel and a Zinc plate. The zinc is sacrificial in that it oxidizes
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 1, 2001
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        Salt is not needed for this to work. Works because it makes a low
        voltage battery with a steel and a Zinc plate. The zinc is sacrificial
        in that it oxidizes more easily and thus keeps the steel charged up a
        bit in a direction so as to resist oxidation.
        MikeL

        mlistman@... wrote:
        >
        > Are you sure that would work? I was under the impression that the
        > salt water was an important piece of the puzzle, as this is a
        > protection based on the electric properties of the metals.
        >
        > Michael Listman
        >
        > --- In tt-forum@y..., MikeL <mikelob@g...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Pick up some Zinc bars and place them in the ground with a heavy
        > wire
        > > running to the container. This will minimize rusting. Marine
        > supplies
        > > have these sort of items. They use them in salt water and with
        > boats to
        > > minimize corrosion and rust.
        > >
        > > MikeL
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • mlistman@ix.netcom.com
        Not salt, but salt water or some other electrolyte. I poked around the net to see what I could find on it. From: http://www.seaguard.co.nz/corrosion.html :
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 1, 2001
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          Not salt, but salt water or some other electrolyte. I poked around
          the net to see what I could find on it.

          From: http://www.seaguard.co.nz/corrosion.html :
          "For galvanic corrosion to occur, there must be an electrical
          circuit. This means there must be a path for the electrons to travel
          between the two dissimilar metals and there must be a path through
          the electrolyte for the ions to travel. Additionally, the chemical
          reaction at the cathode usually requires the presence of oxygen in
          the electrolyte."

          Other sites pointed out that if the electrolyte was not needed, we
          could just attach a zinc bar to our cars to prevent rust. But this is
          not the case. It is only by completely coating the surface with zinc
          the you are afforded protection.

          As another solution, there are plenty of water-proofing coatings that
          could easily be applied to the outside of the container. We are
          tarring our burried steel structure, though it is galvanized as well.

          Michael Listman



          --- In tt-forum@y..., MikeL <mikelob@g...> wrote:
          > Salt is not needed for this to work. Works because it makes a low
          > voltage battery with a steel and a Zinc plate. The zinc is
          sacrificial
          > in that it oxidizes more easily and thus keeps the steel charged up
          a
          > bit in a direction so as to resist oxidation.
          > MikeL
          >
          > mlistman@i... wrote:
          > >
          > > Are you sure that would work? I was under the impression that the
          > > salt water was an important piece of the puzzle, as this is a
          > > protection based on the electric properties of the metals.
          > >
          > > Michael Listman
          > >
          > > --- In tt-forum@y..., MikeL <mikelob@g...> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Pick up some Zinc bars and place them in the ground with a heavy
          > > wire
          > > > running to the container. This will minimize rusting. Marine
          > > supplies
          > > > have these sort of items. They use them in salt water and with
          > > boats to
          > > > minimize corrosion and rust.
          > > >
          > > > MikeL
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        • MikeL
          Salt water is not needed. The reference below that you provided shows plan water being a electrolyte when explaining how Iron rusts. Almost any water mixture
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 2, 2001
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            Salt water is not needed. The reference below that you provided shows
            plan water being a electrolyte when explaining how Iron rusts. Almost
            any water mixture that conducts electricity will work as a electrolyte.
            We should have plenty of this after the PS with near continuous rain.
            Any underground structure will have plenty of so called electrolyte
            (conducting liquid) in contact with it at all times.

            If you notice later in the write up it shows a sacrificial zinc block
            that was successful in protecting aluminum. Note that steel is about 140
            mV to 270 mV less negative than aluminum. This means that Zinc would
            offer steel more protection than aluminum. As the Zinc rusts the Iron is
            kept with a small positive charge that doesn't allow it to rust.

            Sacrificial blocks of Zinc electrically attached to the container in a
            underground environment would provided a worth while measure of
            protection for those who can not afford or find a Zinc plated container,
            paint, and/or tar. If you have ever dug up a galvanized pipe you would
            observe that the pipe doesn't rust much until all of the coating has
            been used up for the full length of the pipe. This demonstrates that
            protection is there as long as some Zinc is in electrical contact.

            I happened to run into the following site. It talks about an
            interesting paint that has a lot of zinc in it. There test show a thin
            layer can provide significant protection. Some may be able to afford
            it. http://www.zinga.be/main.htm

            MikeL

            mlistman@... wrote:
            >
            > Not salt, but salt water or some other electrolyte. I poked around
            > the net to see what I could find on it.
            >
            > From: http://www.seaguard.co.nz/corrosion.html :
            > "For galvanic corrosion to occur, there must be an electrical
            > circuit. This means there must be a path for the electrons to travel
            > between the two dissimilar metals and there must be a path through
            > the electrolyte for the ions to travel. Additionally, the chemical
            > reaction at the cathode usually requires the presence of oxygen in
            > the electrolyte."
            >
            > Other sites pointed out that if the electrolyte was not needed, we
            > could just attach a zinc bar to our cars to prevent rust. But this is
            > not the case. It is only by completely coating the surface with zinc
            > the you are afforded protection.
            >
            > As another solution, there are plenty of water-proofing coatings that
            > could easily be applied to the outside of the container. We are
            > tarring our burried steel structure, though it is galvanized as well.
            >
            > Michael Listman
            >
            > --- In tt-forum@y..., MikeL <mikelob@g...> wrote:
            > > Salt is not needed for this to work. Works because it makes a low
            > > voltage battery with a steel and a Zinc plate. The zinc is
            > sacrificial
            > > in that it oxidizes more easily and thus keeps the steel charged up
            > a
            > > bit in a direction so as to resist oxidation.
            > > MikeL
            > >
            > > mlistman@i... wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Are you sure that would work? I was under the impression that the
            > > > salt water was an important piece of the puzzle, as this is a
            > > > protection based on the electric properties of the metals.
            > > >
            > > > Michael Listman
            > > >
            > > > --- In tt-forum@y..., MikeL <mikelob@g...> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Pick up some Zinc bars and place them in the ground with a heavy
            > > > wire
            > > > > running to the container. This will minimize rusting. Marine
            > > > supplies
            > > > > have these sort of items. They use them in salt water and with
            > > > boats to
            > > > > minimize corrosion and rust.
            > > > >
            > > > > MikeL
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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