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rodents

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  • Cynthia Ratcliffe
    I would think that rodents like roaches will always be a problem. But then the larger ones could be a food source. Some good mouser cats would probably be
    Message 1 of 31 , Jul 1, 2001
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      I would think that rodents like roaches will always be
      a problem. But then the larger ones could be a food
      source. Some good mouser cats would probably be
      better to have than ferrets since there will
      undoubtably still be some surviving cats and dogs.
      Cynthia

      --- Changes <earth.changes@...> wrote:
      > Hi Stephen,
      >
      > Best to try and save some cereal grain for long
      > term storage. I see some of the survival food places
      > have grain such as wheat and oats extra dried and
      > stored in cans. I was wondering if it would still
      > germinate, giving a source of grain seed to be used
      > a
      > couple years after the shift, when the climate
      > starts
      > to stabilize.
      >
      > I feel the earth tremors etc., will happen for
      > months after so hard to start a green house if the
      > winds are still strong the ground still trembles.
      > Best
      > to live of food stored and maybe wait a year to
      > start a
      > green house.
      >
      > Do you think rodents will be a problem with the
      > animal feed, like do we need to own a ferret or
      > something to keep them under control?
      >
      > Dave


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    • Changes
      Mike, The climate will not stabilize for a long time, at least until the new poles form and get reasonably established and until then the ocean circulation
      Message 31 of 31 , Jul 10, 2001
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        Mike,

        The climate will not stabilize for a long time, at least until the new
        poles form and get reasonably established and until then the ocean
        circulation currents will not function as well as they do today. As far as
        the gloom, after the first six months it will get lighter, enough to support
        plants. They will no grow fast but they will survive. If this wasn't the
        case then there would be no animal life on this planet and limited
        vegetation variety.

        Green houses will be needed more to offset the coolness that some plants
        cannot tolerate. Supplemental lighting also to speed growth if you have the
        resources to power the lights available.

        It will lighten substantially for most after one year, but full light
        and normal weather will take decades of course that is only reasonable. The
        number of volcanoes going off will be greatly reduced as well as the
        magnitude of the eruptions. The total amount of dust etc., going in the
        atmosphere from these sources will be much more than today but only a
        fraction of what will happen at the time of the change.

        I will tell you how it was in 50 years or so, as hindsight is 20 <G>.

        Take care

        Dave

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "MikeL" <mikelob@...>
        To: <tt-forum@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2001 2:16 AM
        Subject: Re: [tt-forum] years of darkness or dimness


        > Changes wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > It depends on where you choose to live.
        >
        > I think you are missing the main point. It won't matter much where you
        > live for the first X number of years (probably more than 10 years) The
        > amount of volcanic activity continuing will continue to spew enough into
        > the atmosphere to keep it fairly uniformly dark. It only takes about
        > 20-30 days or so for any one air borne particle of dust to make it
        > around the planet. Mixing and dispersing as it goes we will soon get a
        > thick blanket. I expect there will be thousands (Not a 100 as you
        > indicated) of sources of ash being spewed into the air continually all
        > over the world then how can one expect to see the sun after only one
        > year. The amount of wash out due to rain would at each point in time be
        > balanced by the amount being put back into the sky for each day or
        > year. After X years with gradual decay of volcanic activity, then we
        > may get some variations and occasionally see the sun.
        >
        > Don't get me wrong, I would love to believe that clearing will be swift,
        > who wouldn't. Sometimes reality is hard to confront. Unfortunately,
        > my physics background, and past observations says the 20 years on the
        > average to see the sun as indicated by the Zetas sounds about right.
        >
        > MikeL
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
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