Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

[tt-forum] Bow and arrow

Expand Messages
  • Preben Madsen
    Hello forum members ! I am a new member in this group, and I came across an article yesterday that I wanted to report. How to build a bow yourself: Ash and elm
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 2, 1999
      Hello forum members !
       
      I am a new member in this group, and I came across an article yesterday that I wanted to report.
       
      How to build a bow yourself:
      Ash and elm are the types of wood that has the qualities witch is needed to accomplish sufficient power and recillience in a selfmade bow. The material is splitted in four lengthwise. The bark is allways the bows back. The bow should be as long as the owner height. The stiffest part should be in the middle of the arrow. Patience is often tested during the adjustment. As a string you can use linen thread, and attach in each end in special cut notches. The easiest way is to use hacksaw or very sharp knife. It is also possible to twist the string yourself.
      The arrows can be made of pine tree or birch. The length should be as long as the owners arm. The arrows tip and tail fether can be secured with glue or a thin rope in notches you make.
       
      Pardon my english, but I hope this ca be to some help.
       
      Best regards  PMadsen
    • herbsforresults
      Spend a few bucks and go buy a compound fiberglass one that would last forever. Put in a supply of commercial (straight) arrows and make it put of your PS
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 2, 1999
        Spend a few bucks and go buy a compound fiberglass one that would last forever.  Put in a supply of commercial (straight) arrows and make it put of your PS supplies.  Ash and elm not available everyplace and may be hard to find when you need it.  Easy to find the commercial variety now!
        M
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 1999 2:59 AM
        Subject: [tt-forum] Bow and arrow

        Hello forum members !
         
        I am a new member in this group, and I came across an article yesterday that I wanted to report.
         
        How to build a bow yourself:
        Ash and elm are the types of wood that has the qualities witch is needed to accomplish sufficient power and recillience in a selfmade bow. The material is splitted in four lengthwise. The bark is allways the bows back. The bow should be as long as the owner height. The stiffest part should be in the middle of the arrow. Patience is often tested during the adjustment. As a string you can use linen thread, and attach in each end in special cut notches. The easiest way is to use hacksaw or very sharp knife. It is also possible to twist the string yourself.
        The arrows can be made of pine tree or birch. The length should be as long as the owners arm. The arrows tip and tail fether can be secured with glue or a thin rope in notches you make.
         
        Pardon my english, but I hope this ca be to some help.
         
        Best regards  PMadsen

        click here
        Click here!
        eGroups.com Home: http://www.egroups.com/group/tt-forum
        www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
      • MikeL
        ... The simplicity of your description show a great familiarity with the subject, and is much appreciated. Slippery Elm (ground up bark) is quite useful as a
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 2, 1999
          > Preben Madsen wrote:
          >
          > Hello forum members !
          >
          > I am a new member in this group, and I came across an article
          > yesterday that I wanted to report.
          >
          > How to build a bow yourself:
          > Ash and elm are the types of wood that has the qualities witch is
          > needed to accomplish sufficient power and recillience in a selfmade
          > bow. The material is splitted in four lengthwise. The bark is allways
          > the bows back. The bow should be as long as the owner height. The
          > stiffest part should be in the middle of the arrow. Patience is often
          > tested during the adjustment. As a string you can use linen thread,
          > and attach in each end in special cut notches. The easiest way is to
          > use hacksaw or very sharp knife. It is also possible to twist the
          > string yourself.
          > The arrows can be made of pine tree or birch. The length should be as
          > long as the owners arm. The arrows tip and tail fether can be secured
          > with glue or a thin rope in notches you make.
          >
          > Pardon my english, but I hope this ca be to some help.
          >
          > Best regards PMadsen

          The simplicity of your description show a great familiarity with the
          subject, and is much appreciated.

          Slippery Elm (ground up bark) is quite useful as a healing herb. Pine
          bark also makes another useful antioxidant type herb. I am thinking one
          could plant a few of these two types of seeds outside to naturally grow
          into trees and someday one could make bows and herbs. In the mean time
          until one lost it or it broke or was stolen the newer type break over
          cocking crossbows that shoot aluminum arrows could be used. I have seen
          pistol crossbows in 80lb pull plastic fiber and aluminum body for $20 to
          $40. 120lb rifle crossbows in fiber, metal, wood stock between $80 and
          $130. One such source is Dan Funk 760-747-1666 P.O. Box 787 Vista, CA
          92085.

          One could tape on a laser pointer to the sock and I expect one could get
          somewhat good a hunting small game. Use some of that florescent paint
          or tape on your arrows so you have a better chance of finding them in
          the dark.

          MikeL
        • RiskRraven@aol.com
          In a message dated 11/3/99 1:20:06 AM Eastern Standard Time, mikelob@gte.net writes:
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 3, 1999
            In a message dated 11/3/99 1:20:06 AM Eastern Standard Time, mikelob@...
            writes:

            << I have seen
            pistol crossbows in 80lb pull plastic fiber and aluminum body for $20 to
            $40. >>

            I purchased on of these before, their quality makes them unreliable and their
            low poundage decreases usuable range, and lethality. Also, aiming with any
            pistol configured weapon, crossbow or gun, is going to be less acurate than a
            rifle. If you were to go with crossbow hunting, I would pitch in for the
            more expensive, more powerful, more acurate rifle crossbow. Arrows are not
            always reusable (if the arrow breaks) or retrival (if the animal gets away)
            so its better to be right on target--with a confirmed kill.

            Ted
          • MikeL
            ... Along this line the 50 lb plastic ($10) and the metal body ($13) are the most common found pistol crossbows. These are junk or target practice only as you
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 3, 1999
              RiskRraven@... wrote:
              >
              > In a message dated 11/3/99 1:20:06 AM Eastern Standard Time, mikelob@...
              > writes:
              >
              > << I have seen
              > pistol crossbows in 80lb pull plastic fiber and aluminum body for $20 to
              > $40. >>
              >
              > I purchased on of these before, their quality makes them unreliable and their
              > low poundage decreases usuable range, and lethality. Also, aiming with any
              > pistol configured weapon, crossbow or gun, is going to be less acurate than a
              > rifle. If you were to go with crossbow hunting, I would pitch in for the
              > more expensive, more powerful, more acurate rifle crossbow. Arrows are not
              > always reusable (if the arrow breaks) or retrival (if the animal gets away)
              > so its better to be right on target--with a confirmed kill.
              >
              > Ted

              Along this line the 50 lb plastic ($10) and the metal body ($13) are the
              most common found pistol crossbows. These are junk or target practice
              only as you have described. The 80 lb I consider usable for some
              instances. Teaching a growing youngster to hunt very small game as an
              example. You wouldn't want to shoot a rat with a 120 lb or 150 lb
              crossbow. There are gradients to all things.

              MikeL
            • beemerb@earthlink.net
              riskrrave-@aol.com wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/tt-forum/?start=1919 ... mikelob@gte.net ... $20 to ... and their ... with any ...
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 21, 1999
                riskrrave-@... wrote:
                original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/tt-forum/?start=1919
                > In a message dated 11/3/99 1:20:06 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                mikelob@...
                > writes:
                >
                > << I have seen
                > pistol crossbows in 80lb pull plastic fiber and aluminum body for
                $20 to
                > $40. >>
                >
                > I purchased on of these before, their quality makes them unreliable
                and their
                > low poundage decreases usuable range, and lethality. Also, aiming
                with any
                > pistol configured weapon, crossbow or gun, is going to be less
                acurate than a
                > rifle. If you were to go with crossbow hunting, I would pitch in for
                the
                > more expensive, more powerful, more acurate rifle crossbow. Arrows
                are not
                > always reusable (if the arrow breaks) or retrival (if the animal gets
                away)
                I wonder why?Bows are fine but of limited use.Heavey to carry and
                arrows are large and cumbersome.A 22 rifle loaded with 22 CB shorts or
                longs make no noise.The weapon is much more veristal and can be loaded
                with standard 22 ammo to use for protection or larger game animals.The
                CB's are fantastic for small game.
                Bob
                > so its better to be right on target--with a confirmed kill.
                >
                > Ted
              • RiskRraven@aol.com
                In a message dated 11/21/99 6:46:30 PM Eastern Standard Time, beemerb@earthlink.net writes:
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 22, 1999
                  In a message dated 11/21/99 6:46:30 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                  beemerb@... writes:

                  << A 22 rifle loaded with 22 CB shorts or
                  longs make no noise.The weapon is much more veristal and can be loaded
                  with standard 22 ammo to use for protection or larger game animals.The
                  CB's are fantastic for small game.
                  Bob >>

                  A rifle in preference to a bow is not quite a good idea, but, though it might
                  help to have the rifle anyway, you can't count on a rifle for long term use.
                  Think fo it: We will go by generations before any kind of infrastructure will
                  be permanently set up for the production of bullets, much less any other
                  materials, in fact: they might never be set up. Having a bow or crossbow on
                  hand and the knowledge to make arrows is necessary, as well as rationing your
                  bullets even if you have both weapons on hand. Perhaps the rifle should only
                  be used in the lean times, or in times when more protein is needed. Maybe
                  small game can just be a treat for a cold fall dinner. Something eaten once
                  a year, on Thanksgiving perhaps?

                  Ted
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.