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Re: [tscii] TSC Avarangal font for Linux 9.0

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  • Ramanan Selvaratnam
    Hi Peter, ... Thank you very much. It is a major error :) Apologies. Although I provided the wrong link for iconv such errors can have far reaching
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
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      Hi Peter,

      On Wed, 2003-12-31 at 09:03, Peter Jacobi wrote:

      > A very small clarification

      Thank you very much. It is a major error :) Apologies.

      Although I provided the wrong link for iconv such errors can have far
      reaching consequences.
      eg: When I try and explain to someone who might be in a position to help
      over a related technical matter and if I inadvertently point to the
      wrong resource/info the result can be confusion all around...
      ... goes to proove the need for high precision in terms used in software
      development.

      >
      > Ramanan Selvaratnam <rama@...>:
      >
      > > To elaborate a bit more on TSCII support in GNU/Linux, there is support to
      > > handle TSCII encoded *data* and to inter convert such data between Unicode
      > > UTF-8 encoding. This neat feature is implemented at a GNU tool called iconv.


      > iconv.h is a standard header (required by POSIX) on all Unix
      > (and more) systems. It comes typically with the C compiler.
      >
      > The actual set of character sets supported varies.


      > The GNU C runtime library (for Linux, xBSD, etc) has a very
      > extensive implementation of iconv, and has got TSCII
      > support by Bruno Haible.

      The correct links should have been...
      http://www.gnu.org/directory/glibc.html
      and
      http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_mono/libc.html#glibc%20iconv%20Implementation

      > libiconv is a GNU package, to add iconv functions to non-POSIX
      > systems, especially Windows.
      >
      > Despite great overlap between these projects, they are not
      > identical and don't support the same character sets. libiconv
      > is kept smaller.

      I see. Very useful information. Thanks.

      > TSCII is in GNU C iconv, but not in libiconv. Last time I asked
      > Bruno to add TSCII to libiconv, he declined for these reasons:
      >
      > 1. Not IANA registered
      I do not understand how (what I understand to be a) MIME-Charset
      related standardisation procedure (relevant to the Internet) becomes
      such an important issue for consideration here...
      If there is a simple answer would like to know.

      > 2. No user's demands
      Yes. We must first sort out the digital divide within the Tamil
      population before progressing on to this in an informed manner anyway...

      > 3. Uncertainty whether it would be wise to support TSCII, but not TAB
      This is another reason I admire GNU... clear foresight.

      Does anyone know who (organisation, mailing list etc.) which is
      maintaining TAB related technical issues?


      Best regards,

      Ramanan
    • Ramanan Selvaratnam
      Hi, First a big thank you to the tireless efforts by Mr. Srivas towards Tamil IT efforts. But with all due respect I must disagree and point out few
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
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        Hi,

        First a big thank you to the tireless efforts by Mr. Srivas towards
        Tamil IT efforts.

        But with all due respect I must disagree and point out few alternative
        thoughts on matters very relevant to the goals TSCII seems to have been
        orginally invented.

        [Also I cannot help but touch on software freedoms related issues that
        must be considered as a factor for Tamil IT empowerment and as related
        to the subject of this thread.]

        On Wed, 2003-12-31 at 23:48, Sinnathurai Srivas wrote:

        > TSC_Avarangal is infact TSCuAvarangal. The font was released with TSC_Avarangal as a name long before the suggestion was made by some one to add the "u" identifier. The font was released with Unicode and TSCII suuport long before other fonts started to appear.

        First let us acknowledge that the current dual encoded Tamil fonts do
        not implement the Latin-1 space as specified by Unicode so cannot be
        considered a Unicode font. We all need to move towards full correct
        implentaion ofthe Unicode specifications.

        Basically in TSCu fonts currently in use as the Latin-1 space is
        occupied by dear old Tamil.

        I do not know who brought in the term TSCu but I can see some logic here
        as the temporary measure (for various technical work arounds) of dual
        encoding Tamil in this way [*] should be temporary.

        With the free software revolution these fonts are spreadig far and wide
        (exactly as intended) but don't we want some mechanism to identify such
        fonts from TSCII fonts as the were initially intended?
        (I write all this with an assumption the prefix TSC was and is for TSCII
        fonts by some agreed mechanism at TSCII creation time. If not please
        help me understand better)

        >
        > The font name is some thing very significant in getting the webpages and email to work as such
        So? (I do not see the connection here...)

        > we can not keep renaming fonts.
        Well, if we went through clearly temporary measures with fonts then
        vital identification related parts of the font names would be temporary
        too.
        ie, the day the pleasures of Latin-1 characters are brought back into
        the Tamil domain we will not only have new naming schemes also no more
        TSCu.


        > There are thousands of users,
        I am sorry .. there are millions of non users

        Also who is to say these 'thousands' should not implement few commonly
        done easy to do changes?

        > who can not keep changing the font names for installation ans support purposes.
        Well too bad if a minority of people are that adamant to hold on to
        views that would only serve to disturb standardistaion that Tamil IT is
        crying out for some time now.

        Anyway these thousands of existing Tamil IT users change filesystems
        (MS-Win95 -> MS-Win98 -> MS-Win2k -> MSWinXP ) and other similar major
        aspects of software. So to assume they are incapable of changing fonts
        or that software developers cannot provide easy tools to do such changes
        is an incorrect.


        > There are two versions of TSC_Avarangal
        > 1/ is linear TSC_Avarangal (Linear Unicode TSCII)
        > 2/ Fully rendered TSC_Avarangal. (Fully rendered Unicode + TSCII)
        Thanks for this information.

        I hope Rajni Ramki notes this as this thread started with a search for
        TSC_Avarangal.

        > Hope this help.
        Point 2/ above can be helpful if we all can agree on a common term for
        what you are referring to as 'fully rendered'. As rendering of the font
        is done by other dedicated systems I would prefer to arrive at another
        helpful word like 'Opentype enbaled' or whatever ...
        As one of the leading Tamil font author I hope you will help us all talk
        the same technical language.

        Best regards,

        Ramanan

        [*] Dual (even Triple...) encoding Tamil fonts is most likely possible
        within the Unicode framework without breaking Latin-1 support. But
        before adding on any more major encoding strategies we must really sort
        out the current confusions.
      • Sinnathurai Srivas
        Dear Ramani, The number of users who do not know how to stup Tamil email and Tamil browsing is far more than the number of users actually have setup to use
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
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          Dear Ramani,

          The number of users who do not know how to stup Tamil email and Tamil browsing is far more than the number of users actually have setup to use Tamil. I'm not talking about techies. I'm talking about average users, who want to use the facility and whome, we should be supporting and not the techies.

          It is a massive task to setup fonts in email programs and browsers. Changing a single alphabet on a font can have severe consequent for an average user. So, TSC_ and TSCu are complications that is introdced unnecessarily mainly for developers need and not for users need.

          There may be many thousands of users using TabAvarangal2 font. This was the original font cameout with Unicode and 8bit-tamil support. I do not think this again would be of any help, if we start changing names. Why, because the establishment does not allow 8bit Tamil. We have to fiddle with setup to get things working and it is not automatic. It is not automatic, because the establishment is against using 8bit Tamil.

          I think average users should get the support first, before developers get their support.


          As for moving to total unicode, I agree with you and there are many a few Tamil unicode fonts, including aAvarangal.

          Ramanan Selvaratnam <rama@...> wrote:
          Hi,

          First a big thank you to the tireless efforts by Mr. Srivas towards
          Tamil IT efforts.

          But with all due respect I must disagree and point out few alternative
          thoughts on matters very relevant to the goals TSCII seems to have been
          orginally invented.

          [Also I cannot help but touch on software freedoms related issues that
          must be considered as a factor for Tamil IT empowerment and as related
          to the subject of this thread.]

          On Wed, 2003-12-31 at 23:48, Sinnathurai Srivas wrote:

          > TSC_Avarangal is infact TSCuAvarangal. The font was released with TSC_Avarangal as a name long before the suggestion was made by some one to add the "u" identifier. The font was released with Unicode and TSCII suuport long before other fonts started to appear.

          First let us acknowledge that the current dual encoded Tamil fonts do
          not implement the Latin-1 space as specified by Unicode so cannot be
          considered a Unicode font. We all need to move towards full correct
          implentaion ofthe Unicode specifications.

          Basically in TSCu fonts currently in use as the Latin-1 space is
          occupied by dear old Tamil.

          I do not know who brought in the term TSCu but I can see some logic here
          as the temporary measure (for various technical work arounds) of dual
          encoding Tamil in this way [*] should be temporary.

          With the free software revolution these fonts are spreadig far and wide
          (exactly as intended) but don't we want some mechanism to identify such
          fonts from TSCII fonts as the were initially intended?
          (I write all this with an assumption the prefix TSC was and is for TSCII
          fonts by some agreed mechanism at TSCII creation time. If not please
          help me understand better)

          >
          > The font name is some thing very significant in getting the webpages and email to work as such
          So? (I do not see the connection here...)

          > we can not keep renaming fonts.
          Well, if we went through clearly temporary measures with fonts then
          vital identification related parts of the font names would be temporary
          too.
          ie, the day the pleasures of Latin-1 characters are brought back into
          the Tamil domain we will not only have new naming schemes also no more
          TSCu.


          > There are thousands of users,
          I am sorry .. there are millions of non users

          Also who is to say these 'thousands' should not implement few commonly
          done easy to do changes?

          > who can not keep changing the font names for installation ans support purposes.
          Well too bad if a minority of people are that adamant to hold on to
          views that would only serve to disturb standardistaion that Tamil IT is
          crying out for some time now.

          Anyway these thousands of existing Tamil IT users change filesystems
          (MS-Win95 -> MS-Win98 -> MS-Win2k -> MSWinXP ) and other similar major
          aspects of software. So to assume they are incapable of changing fonts
          or that software developers cannot provide easy tools to do such changes
          is an incorrect.


          > There are two versions of TSC_Avarangal
          > 1/ is linear TSC_Avarangal (Linear Unicode TSCII)
          > 2/ Fully rendered TSC_Avarangal. (Fully rendered Unicode + TSCII)
          Thanks for this information.

          I hope Rajni Ramki notes this as this thread started with a search for
          TSC_Avarangal.

          > Hope this help.
          Point 2/ above can be helpful if we all can agree on a common term for
          what you are referring to as 'fully rendered'. As rendering of the font
          is done by other dedicated systems I would prefer to arrive at another
          helpful word like 'Opentype enbaled' or whatever ...
          As one of the leading Tamil font author I hope you will help us all talk
          the same technical language.

          Best regards,

          Ramanan

          [*] Dual (even Triple...) encoding Tamil fonts is most likely possible
          within the Unicode framework without breaking Latin-1 support. But
          before adding on any more major encoding strategies we must really sort
          out the current confusions.



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        • Sinnathurai Srivas
          Dear ramani, I m adding some more comments to what i wrote below. Initially TSC was a suffix. after some time, with some changes it was changed to TSC preix.
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
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            Dear ramani,

            I'm adding some more comments to what i wrote below.

            Initially TSC was a suffix. after some time, with some changes it was changed to TSC preix. Webbrowers and email programs do not automatically use different fonts, even if you have the old fonts in the system. That was a major change. However, it was discussed and decided at the TSCII tamil.net discussion forum.

            TSCu is anotehr change., that was not properly discussed, but seems to creap in as a standard. If existing font names are changed, we might loose the seemless ability to read existing Tamil publications.

            You might have experienced how expert users were struggling to get Linear TSC_Avarangal to swap to fully rendered TSC_Avarangal. Imagin, if the font name was changed. Many would not know where to turn to. This is another reason, I published the latest fully rendered version with the same name as linear version.

            Srivas

            Sinnathurai Srivas <sisrivas@...> wrote:
            Dear Ramani,

            The number of users who do not know how to stup Tamil email and Tamil browsing is far more than the number of users actually have setup to use Tamil. I'm not talking about techies. I'm talking about average users, who want to use the facility and whome, we should be supporting and not the techies.

            It is a massive task to setup fonts in email programs and browsers. Changing a single alphabet on a font can have severe consequent for an average user. So, TSC_ and TSCu are complications that is introdced unnecessarily mainly for developers need and not for users need.

            There may be many thousands of users using TabAvarangal2 font. This was the original font cameout with Unicode and 8bit-tamil support. I do not think this again would be of any help, if we start changing names. Why, because the establishment does not allow 8bit Tamil. We have to fiddle with setup to get things working and it is not automatic. It is not automatic, because the establishment is against using 8bit Tamil.

            I think average users should get the support first, before developers get their support.


            As for moving to total unicode, I agree with you and there are many a few Tamil unicode fonts, including aAvarangal.

            Ramanan Selvaratnam <rama@...> wrote:
            Hi,

            First a big thank you to the tireless efforts by Mr. Srivas towards
            Tamil IT efforts.

            But with all due respect I must disagree and point out few alternative
            thoughts on matters very relevant to the goals TSCII seems to have been
            orginally invented.

            [Also I cannot help but touch on software freedoms related issues that
            must be considered as a factor for Tamil IT empowerment and as related
            to the subject of this thread.]

            On Wed, 2003-12-31 at 23:48, Sinnathurai Srivas wrote:

            > TSC_Avarangal is infact TSCuAvarangal. The font was released with TSC_Avarangal as a name long before the suggestion was made by some one to add the "u" identifier. The font was released with Unicode and TSCII suuport long before other fonts started to appear.

            First let us acknowledge that the current dual encoded Tamil fonts do
            not implement the Latin-1 space as specified by Unicode so cannot be
            considered a Unicode font. We all need to move towards full correct
            implentaion ofthe Unicode specifications.

            Basically in TSCu fonts currently in use as the Latin-1 space is
            occupied by dear old Tamil.

            I do not know who brought in the term TSCu but I can see some logic here
            as the temporary measure (for various technical work arounds) of dual
            encoding Tamil in this way [*] should be temporary.

            With the free software revolution these fonts are spreadig far and wide
            (exactly as intended) but don't we want some mechanism to identify such
            fonts from TSCII fonts as the were initially intended?
            (I write all this with an assumption the prefix TSC was and is for TSCII
            fonts by some agreed mechanism at TSCII creation time. If not please
            help me understand better)

            >
            > The font name is some thing very significant in getting the webpages and email to work as such
            So? (I do not see the connection here...)

            > we can not keep renaming fonts.
            Well, if we went through clearly temporary measures with fonts then
            vital identification related parts of the font names would be temporary
            too.
            ie, the day the pleasures of Latin-1 characters are brought back into
            the Tamil domain we will not only have new naming schemes also no more
            TSCu.


            > There are thousands of users,
            I am sorry .. there are millions of non users

            Also who is to say these 'thousands' should not implement few commonly
            done easy to do changes?

            > who can not keep changing the font names for installation ans support purposes.
            Well too bad if a minority of people are that adamant to hold on to
            views that would only serve to disturb standardistaion that Tamil IT is
            crying out for some time now.

            Anyway these thousands of existing Tamil IT users change filesystems
            (MS-Win95 -> MS-Win98 -> MS-Win2k -> MSWinXP ) and other similar major
            aspects of software. So to assume they are incapable of changing fonts
            or that software developers cannot provide easy tools to do such changes
            is an incorrect.


            > There are two versions of TSC_Avarangal
            > 1/ is linear TSC_Avarangal (Linear Unicode TSCII)
            > 2/ Fully rendered TSC_Avarangal. (Fully rendered Unicode + TSCII)
            Thanks for this information.

            I hope Rajni Ramki notes this as this thread started with a search for
            TSC_Avarangal.

            > Hope this help.
            Point 2/ above can be helpful if we all can agree on a common term for
            what you are referring to as 'fully rendered'. As rendering of the font
            is done by other dedicated systems I would prefer to arrive at another
            helpful word like 'Opentype enbaled' or whatever ...
            As one of the leading Tamil font author I hope you will help us all talk
            the same technical language.

            Best regards,

            Ramanan

            [*] Dual (even Triple...) encoding Tamil fonts is most likely possible
            within the Unicode framework without breaking Latin-1 support. But
            before adding on any more major encoding strategies we must really sort
            out the current confusions.



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            To visit your group on the web, go to:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/tscii/

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



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          • Ramanan Selvaratnam
            Hi, ... Of course. This is one of the coner stone priciples of the free software movement I subscribe to. I think you are referring to non-free software where
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
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              Hi,

              On Thu, 2004-01-01 at 16:28, Sinnathurai Srivas wrote:

              > The number of users who do not know how to stup Tamil email and Tamil browsing is far more than the number of users actually have setup to use Tamil.
              Of course. This is one of the coner stone priciples of the free
              software movement I subscribe to.
              I think you are referring to non-free software where you do not have the
              freedom to change this state of affairs you are describing.

              > I'm not talking about techies. I'm talking about average users,
              So am I. The average Tamil user for me includes the rough estimates of
              the vastly huge numbers that are about to be empowered.

              > who want to use the facility and whome, we should be supporting and not the techies.
              So? ... this is exactly why I was suggesting we (as techies) yearn for
              standards. The sad situation is we do not have even one established
              standard amidst arguably the largest collection different font systems
              in the world. We (the techies who deal in fonts and related affairs like
              encodings and font naming) have not done any favours so far to the
              'average user'.
              Please do not get me wrong as this is not finger pointing at anyone...
              just a lament that there is no cohesive information available freely and
              centrally.

              > It is a massive task to setup fonts in email programs and browsers.

              In RedHat GNU/Linux 9.0 you drop the font in a directory and issue a
              command.
              You and me are free to improove on it by building a simple application
              with a button displaying clear Tamil text saying install fonts and
              merging into the system at the highest level for every one to enjoy.
              Infact I just saw someone making a Hebrew font install button developed
              for Fedora Core 1 (bascially Redhat version 10 packaged differently so
              others can brand and sell the system) -- press the button and the font
              is installed system wide or for within a particular user space.
              (Hebrew, Arabic and many ther languages also went through a 8-Bit
              encoding to Unicode phase except the evolution seems to be much more
              smooth)

              Systems like Mandarake and SuSE already have font installation like this
              for a long time. Infact they even went out of the way to support TSCII
              Tamil except our font related mess confused the hell out of them :(

              > Changing a single alphabet on a font can have severe consequent for an average user. So, TSC_ and TSCu are complications that is introdced unnecessarily mainly for developers need and not for users need.
              As I pointed out I can see some logic behind the name TSCu but it makes
              no sense if people do not follow it ... and you are correct in that this
              confuses people. ( although now this is a thing of the past there is
              definitely something to learn for the future on the value of cooperation
              though...)

              > There may be many thousands of users using TabAvarangal2 font. This was the original font cameout with Unicode and 8bit-tamil support. I do not think this again would be of any help, if we start changing names. Why, because the establishment does not allow 8bit Tamil. We have to fiddle with setup to get things working and it is not automatic.
              The thing is in the free software domain I strongly feel all 8 Bit
              encoding support should be discontinued so Latin-1 is available to
              Tamil like to everyone else in the world (we are not freaks).
              Then reimplementing it can be done once we manage to standardise.

              I am sure minor issues like naming of fonts can be tackled at that
              point.

              > It is not automatic, because the establishment is against using 8bit Tamil.

              Sorry this is totally wrong.

              It is the Tamil IT pioneers who failed to establish 8-Bit Tamil as a
              standard.

              [This is could be seen as brash by people who do not know me as I amnew
              to the Tamil IT scene. But the statement is made with clear
              understanding and hours of browsing of available archives as much as
              and when time permitted....]

              Apparently we still have some chances. But I do not know why there is so
              much inactivity.

              (eg: TSCII registration with IANA will bring built in support atleast
              with the free software web browsers for anyone wishing to stick to TSCII
              encoded data exchange on the Internet)

              > I think average users should get the support first, before developers get their support.
              Developers need clear information not support. So we cannot compare this
              can we?

              > As for moving to total unicode, I agree with you and there are many a few Tamil unicode fonts, including aAvarangal.
              We urgently need Unicode fonts that stick to the Unicode specs.
              In my case I need them to be freely modifiable and freely distributable
              ie, as free font.
              Not test fonts or those with Tamil Glyphs in Latin-1 space and wrongly
              claiming to be Unicode ... just Tamil in Tamil space.

              Best regards,

              Ramanan
            • Ramanan Selvaratnam
              Hi, ... Thanks for the info. I think I am might be in the wrong forum here. Still it hurts to see bad support and advice being heaped on new free software
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
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                Hi,

                On Thu, 2004-01-01 at 16:47, Sinnathurai Srivas wrote:

                > TSC [...] decided at the TSCII tamil.net discussion forum.
                Thanks for the info. I think I am might be in the wrong forum here.
                Still it hurts to see bad support and advice being heaped on new free
                software users so I will hang around here too :)

                > TSCu is anotehr change., that was not properly discussed,
                OK, noted.

                > but seems to creap in as a standard.
                Objection! :)

                A standard in this new era simply cannot creep in.
                (One could argue what is a standard forever I guess ... so I will add on
                the words 'internationally accepted')

                It has to have documentation clearly published and available freely (not
                hidden behind passwords or other restrictions)

                We do not have any standards in our font systems AFAIK.

                Lets thank god for Unicode consortium accomodating what seems to be
                late interventions from us. It is a miracle they had implemented Tamil
                to satisfactory levels and left some space adjustments.

                > If existing font names are changed, we might loose the seemless ability to read existing Tamil publications.
                This is very wrong. Probably did not come out as you wanted to type
                it...

                Data flows as bits of electronic signals and make such bits sense when
                they are encoded. In the absence of standards we have been in effect
                cheating to mimick other established encodings.
                Fonts names do not not have anything to do with this. It is the font's
                encoding that matter to visualise the data.

                Old publication's data can be easlily and effortlessly converted back
                and forth into UTF-8 (one of many encodings of) Unicode with free
                software like iconv (dicussed upstream).

                [I type in a hurry hoping Peter Jacobi or someone else familiar with
                these will touch up on any mistakes I make on this point.]


                > You might have experienced how expert users were struggling to get Linear TSC_Avarangal to swap to fully rendered TSC_Avarangal.
                That is the exact reason why I finally joined this group.
                I noticed in at least three free software (that render Tamil characters)
                related bug reports wrong assumptions by the person who made the request
                (in software terminology 'bug report filed by the user') on TSCII
                related matters were the cause of all the woes/struggles.
                As soon as there was clarity the 'bugs' were fixed.

                > Imagin, if the font name was changed. Many would not know where to turn to.
                Just install the font in the system. So the user just gets a system with
                Tamil support (not having to go and play around for endless hours in the
                disability section of some software that never cares about Tamil
                anyway...)

                > This is another reason, I published the latest fully rendered version with the same name as linear version.
                Thanks for engaging in a conversation (that prooved to be informative
                for me atleast) although the font naming is actually a minor issue.


                Best regards,

                Ramanan
              • Sinnathurai Srivas
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                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 1, 2004
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                  Ramanan Selvaratnam <rama@...> wrote:
                  Hi,

                  On Thu, 2004-01-01 at 16:47, Sinnathurai Srivas wrote:

                  > TSC [...] decided at the TSCII tamil.net discussion forum.
                  Thanks for the info. I think I am might be in the wrong forum here.
                  Still it hurts to see bad support and advice being heaped on new free
                  software users so I will hang around here too :)

                  > TSCu is anotehr change., that was not properly discussed,
                  OK, noted.

                  > but seems to creap in as a standard.
                  Objection! :)

                  A standard in this new era simply cannot creep in.
                  (One could argue what is a standard forever I guess ... so I will add on
                  the words 'internationally accepted')

                  It has to have documentation clearly published and available freely (not
                  hidden behind passwords or other restrictions)

                  We do not have any standards in our font systems AFAIK.

                  Lets thank god for Unicode consortium accomodating what seems to be
                  late interventions from us. It is a miracle they had implemented Tamil
                  to satisfactory levels and left some space adjustments.

                  > If existing font names are changed, we might loose the seemless ability to read existing Tamil publications.
                  This is very wrong. Probably did not come out as you wanted to type
                  it...

                  Data flows as bits of electronic signals and make such bits sense when
                  they are encoded. In the absence of standards we have been in effect
                  cheating to mimick other established encodings.
                  Fonts names do not not have anything to do with this. It is the font's
                  encoding that matter to visualise the data.

                  Old publication's data can be easlily and effortlessly converted back
                  and forth into UTF-8 (one of many encodings of) Unicode with free
                  software like iconv (dicussed upstream).

                  [I type in a hurry hoping Peter Jacobi or someone else familiar with
                  these will touch up on any mistakes I make on this point.]


                  > You might have experienced how expert users were struggling to get Linear TSC_Avarangal to swap to fully rendered TSC_Avarangal.
                  That is the exact reason why I finally joined this group.
                  I noticed in at least three free software (that render Tamil characters)
                  related bug reports wrong assumptions by the person who made the request
                  (in software terminology 'bug report filed by the user') on TSCII
                  related matters were the cause of all the woes/struggles.
                  As soon as there was clarity the 'bugs' were fixed.

                  > Imagin, if the font name was changed. Many would not know where to turn to.
                  Just install the font in the system. So the user just gets a system with
                  Tamil support (not having to go and play around for endless hours in the
                  disability section of some software that never cares about Tamil
                  anyway...)

                  > This is another reason, I published the latest fully rendered version with the same name as linear version.
                  Thanks for engaging in a conversation (that prooved to be informative
                  for me atleast) although the font naming is actually a minor issue.


                  Best regards,

                  Ramanan




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