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Re: [ts-7000] TS-7300 Linux fast boot: 1.69 seconds!

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  • Don W. Carr
    Wow, thanks. That is just what I need! Great to see all of the inovations possible because you are using Linux. Good to see that development is very active.
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 7, 2006
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      Wow, thanks. That is just what I need! Great to see all of the inovations possible because you are using Linux. Good to see that development is very active. Don.

      On 7/6/06, Jesse Off <joff@...> wrote:

      Okay, we have now gotten the TS-7300 to bootup to a Linux prompt
      1.69 seconds(!) after power-up. The new SD image is available on
      our FTP site:

      ftp://ftp.embeddedARM.com/fastboot-7300-sdcard-7-6-2006.dd.bz2

      This should be bunzip2'ed and dd'ed to the "disc" device of the
      SDcard. It requires at least a 256MB SDcard. The above includes
      kernel tweaks, initrd tweaks and a few tweaks inside the Debian
      filesystem itself. (part3) This will completely overwrite the SD
      image on the card so make sure you do the appropriate backups before
      updating. To use the image on a larger card, just dd to the larger
      card, use fdisk to increase the size of part3 to remaining space
      (taking care to keep the same start sector), and then use
      the "ext2resize" command on that partition.

      The new SD image is only part of the fast boot optimizations, as we
      have tweaked the TS-SDBOOT bootup firmware as well. To update to
      the new TS-SDBOOT, download and run (as root) the following binary
      executable on your TS-7300 board:

      ftp://ftp.embeddedARM.com/sdboot-update-7-6-2006

      The new SD image will look at the state of jumper 6. If JP6 is on,
      the full Debian bootup will be bypassed and the system will instead
      drop straight to a shell prompt. 1.69 seconds after power-on the
      serial console prompt is active and 2.41 seconds after power-on the
      video console is displayed. Video takes a bit longer to start up
      due to the fact that the FPGA must be initialized, a splash screen
      is displayed, and USB keyboard kernel modules must be loaded. To
      initiate a full Debian startup, simply type "exit" at either the
      shell prompt on the serial port or the shell prompt on the VGA
      monitor (using the USB keyboard)

      The time it takes for bootup is also displayed right before the SH
      prompt is printed. On new Rev C CPLD TS-7300's, the CPLD has a 32-
      bit counter that starts at 0 at poweron and is used to measure the
      bootup time extremely accurately. On other boards, the EP9302
      983Khz debug4 timer is used since it starts out as 0 also, but is
      slightly less accurate than the 32-bit 14.7Mhz counter implemented
      in the new CPLD rev.

      If you want something other than a shell prompt running as soon as
      possible on bootup, it is possible by editing the /linuxrc2 shell
      script on the initrd. When you do the fast boot, you are actually
      booting to an initrd with the Debian parts of filesystem mounted
      read-only. After modifying the /linuxrc2 shell script on the
      initrd, run the "save" command to save the initrd back to the SD
      card, otherwise your changes won't "stick".

      //Jesse Off




      --
      Dr. Don W. Carr
      J. G. Montenegro 2258
      Guadalajara, Mexico
      +52-333-630-0704
      +52-333-836-4500 ext 2930
    • Jesse Off
      Its worth mentioning that even though 1.69 seconds is pretty good for Linux its still a miserable long time compared to most RTOS. For instance, eCOS (the
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 7, 2006
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        Its worth mentioning that even though 1.69 seconds is pretty good
        for Linux its still a miserable long time compared to most RTOS.
        For instance, eCOS (the real-time operating system that RedBoot runs
        on) and Windows CE are up and ready to run applications in
        milliseconds after power-on. With these types of systems the BIOS
        initialization time becomes the weak link for "instant-on" designs.
        The TS-7300 bootup firmware was designed to be much faster than a
        x86 PC/SBC BIOS so even better bootup times can be acheived with an
        RTOS.

        Part of these optimizations on Linux were done for applications of
        the new TS-BAT3 PC104 board we designed. Basically, this board is a
        battery backup board that one can program to turn off the system and
        have it come back on (with or without external power) at an
        arbitrary time. Several applications of this are remote sensors
        where the SBC only has to be online every 5 minutes or so just long
        enough to check a sensor or two and go back to sleep. Checking a
        sensor may take only .01 seconds of CPU time most of the time. Your
        bootup time quickly becomes where the bulk of your battery/saved
        solar power is spent-- even at 1.69 s, 99% of your power was spent
        by Linux and firmware bootup boilerplate and not your code. Of that
        1.69 s, about 1.4 represents fair game for optimization (Linux
        bootstrap) and about .3 of it is the hardware init.

        //Jesse Off



        --- In ts-7000@yahoogroups.com, "Don W. Carr" <doncarr@...> wrote:
        >
        > Wow, thanks. That is just what I need! Great to see all of the
        inovations
        > possible because you are using Linux. Good to see that development
        is very
        > active. Don.
      • suptouch
        Many thanks Jesse for this new that s I need for my project. Like your new solution with TS-BAT3, In my application, I ve to cut the power in most time , and
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 10, 2006
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          Many thanks Jesse for this new that's I need for my project. Like your
          new solution with TS-BAT3, In my application, I've to cut the power in
          most time , and wake-up to make measurment. I've develop a low power
          control board wich manage the switch-on, witch-off, the wake-up
          events, etc...

          The constraint are :
          - the boot time acquisition (have to be less 5s)
          - the global boot time (to save power)
          - the global shutdown time (to save power)

          So the solution is I think :
          - fast boot time : fast bootloader + not using debian + light init
          - ramdisk linux : no need umount, faster load

          So many thank for this new ts7300 development


          --- In ts-7000@yahoogroups.com, "Jesse Off" <joff@...> wrote:
          >
          > Its worth mentioning that even though 1.69 seconds is pretty good
          > for Linux its still a miserable long time compared to most RTOS.
          > For instance, eCOS (the real-time operating system that RedBoot runs
          > on) and Windows CE are up and ready to run applications in
          > milliseconds after power-on. With these types of systems the BIOS
          > initialization time becomes the weak link for "instant-on" designs.
          > The TS-7300 bootup firmware was designed to be much faster than a
          > x86 PC/SBC BIOS so even better bootup times can be acheived with an
          > RTOS.
          >
          > Part of these optimizations on Linux were done for applications of
          > the new TS-BAT3 PC104 board we designed. Basically, this board is a
          > battery backup board that one can program to turn off the system and
          > have it come back on (with or without external power) at an
          > arbitrary time. Several applications of this are remote sensors
          > where the SBC only has to be online every 5 minutes or so just long
          > enough to check a sensor or two and go back to sleep. Checking a
          > sensor may take only .01 seconds of CPU time most of the time. Your
          > bootup time quickly becomes where the bulk of your battery/saved
          > solar power is spent-- even at 1.69 s, 99% of your power was spent
          > by Linux and firmware bootup boilerplate and not your code. Of that
          > 1.69 s, about 1.4 represents fair game for optimization (Linux
          > bootstrap) and about .3 of it is the hardware init.
          >
          > //Jesse Off
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In ts-7000@yahoogroups.com, "Don W. Carr" <doncarr@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Wow, thanks. That is just what I need! Great to see all of the
          > inovations
          > > possible because you are using Linux. Good to see that development
          > is very
          > > active. Don.
          >
        • Don W. Carr
          I understand that 1.69 seconds may be an eternity compared to other devices designed from the ground up to boot fast, but, compared to a brand of RTUs I know
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 10, 2006
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            I understand that 1.69 seconds may be an eternity compared to other devices designed from the ground up to boot fast, but, compared to a brand of RTUs I know that cost 5x more, and also running the 2.4 kernel, 1.69 seconds is almost nothing! And, with the functionality, stability, and continuing inovation we get from the Linux kernel, really well worth it. Don.

            On 7/7/06, Jesse Off <joff@...> wrote:

            Its worth mentioning that even though 1.69 seconds is pretty good
            for Linux its still a miserable long time compared to most RTOS.
            For instance, eCOS (the real-time operating system that RedBoot runs
            on) and Windows CE are up and ready to run applications in
            milliseconds after power-on. With these types of systems the BIOS
            initialization time becomes the weak link for "instant-on" designs.
            The TS-7300 bootup firmware was designed to be much faster than a
            x86 PC/SBC BIOS so even better bootup times can be acheived with an
            RTOS.

            Part of these optimizations on Linux were done for applications of
            the new TS-BAT3 PC104 board we designed. Basically, this board is a
            battery backup board that one can program to turn off the system and
            have it come back on (with or without external power) at an
            arbitrary time. Several applications of this are remote sensors
            where the SBC only has to be online every 5 minutes or so just long
            enough to check a sensor or two and go back to sleep. Checking a
            sensor may take only .01 seconds of CPU time most of the time. Your
            bootup time quickly becomes where the bulk of your battery/saved
            solar power is spent-- even at 1.69 s, 99% of your power was spent
            by Linux and firmware bootup boilerplate and not your code. Of that
            1.69 s, about 1.4 represents fair game for optimization (Linux
            bootstrap) and about .3 of it is the hardware init.

            //Jesse Off



            --- In ts-7000@yahoogroups.com, "Don W. Carr" <doncarr@...> wrote:
            >
            > Wow, thanks. That is just what I need! Great to see all of the
            inovations
            > possible because you are using Linux. Good to see that development
            is very
            > active. Don.




            --
            Dr. Don W. Carr
            J. G. Montenegro 2258
            Guadalajara, Mexico
            +52-333-630-0704
            +52-333-836-4500 ext 2930
          • arm.user
            Dear Jesse Great job. What would be needed to do this in the TS-7250 or TS- 7260? Roy ... before ... larger ... we ... on, ... instead ... the
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 21, 2006
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              Dear Jesse

              Great job. What would be needed to do this in the TS-7250 or TS-
              7260?

              Roy

              n ts-7000@yahoogroups.com, "Jesse Off" <joff@...> wrote:
              >
              > Okay, we have now gotten the TS-7300 to bootup to a Linux prompt
              > 1.69 seconds(!) after power-up. The new SD image is available on
              > our FTP site:
              >
              > ftp://ftp.embeddedARM.com/fastboot-7300-sdcard-7-6-2006.dd.bz2
              >
              > This should be bunzip2'ed and dd'ed to the "disc" device of the
              > SDcard. It requires at least a 256MB SDcard. The above includes
              > kernel tweaks, initrd tweaks and a few tweaks inside the Debian
              > filesystem itself. (part3) This will completely overwrite the SD
              > image on the card so make sure you do the appropriate backups
              before
              > updating. To use the image on a larger card, just dd to the
              larger
              > card, use fdisk to increase the size of part3 to remaining space
              > (taking care to keep the same start sector), and then use
              > the "ext2resize" command on that partition.
              >
              > The new SD image is only part of the fast boot optimizations, as
              we
              > have tweaked the TS-SDBOOT bootup firmware as well. To update to
              > the new TS-SDBOOT, download and run (as root) the following binary
              > executable on your TS-7300 board:
              >
              > ftp://ftp.embeddedARM.com/sdboot-update-7-6-2006
              >
              > The new SD image will look at the state of jumper 6. If JP6 is
              on,
              > the full Debian bootup will be bypassed and the system will
              instead
              > drop straight to a shell prompt. 1.69 seconds after power-on the
              > serial console prompt is active and 2.41 seconds after power-on
              the
              > video console is displayed. Video takes a bit longer to start up
              > due to the fact that the FPGA must be initialized, a splash screen
              > is displayed, and USB keyboard kernel modules must be loaded. To
              > initiate a full Debian startup, simply type "exit" at either the
              > shell prompt on the serial port or the shell prompt on the VGA
              > monitor (using the USB keyboard)
              >
              > The time it takes for bootup is also displayed right before the SH
              > prompt is printed. On new Rev C CPLD TS-7300's, the CPLD has a 32-
              > bit counter that starts at 0 at poweron and is used to measure the
              > bootup time extremely accurately. On other boards, the EP9302
              > 983Khz debug4 timer is used since it starts out as 0 also, but is
              > slightly less accurate than the 32-bit 14.7Mhz counter implemented
              > in the new CPLD rev.
              >
              > If you want something other than a shell prompt running as soon as
              > possible on bootup, it is possible by editing the /linuxrc2 shell
              > script on the initrd. When you do the fast boot, you are actually
              > booting to an initrd with the Debian parts of filesystem mounted
              > read-only. After modifying the /linuxrc2 shell script on the
              > initrd, run the "save" command to save the initrd back to the SD
              > card, otherwise your changes won't "stick".
              >
              > //Jesse Off
              >
            • Jesse Off
              We just started shipping TS-7400 s today, and were able to squeeze a 34% faster bootup on the 7400 than we have on the 7300. The TS-7400 is currently booting
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 2, 2006
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                We just started shipping TS-7400's today, and were able to squeeze a
                34% faster bootup on the 7400 than we have on the 7300. The TS-7400
                is currently booting to a Linux shell prompt in 1.10 seconds.

                //Jesse Off


                --- In ts-7000@yahoogroups.com, "Jesse Off" <joff@...> wrote:
                >
                > Okay, we have now gotten the TS-7300 to bootup to a Linux prompt
                > 1.69 seconds(!) after power-up. The new SD image is available on
                > our FTP site:
                >
                > ftp://ftp.embeddedARM.com/fastboot-7300-sdcard-7-6-2006.dd.bz2
                >
                > This should be bunzip2'ed and dd'ed to the "disc" device of the
                > SDcard. It requires at least a 256MB SDcard. The above includes
                > kernel tweaks, initrd tweaks and a few tweaks inside the Debian
                > filesystem itself. (part3) This will completely overwrite the SD
                > image on the card so make sure you do the appropriate backups
                before
                > updating. To use the image on a larger card, just dd to the
                larger
                > card, use fdisk to increase the size of part3 to remaining space
                > (taking care to keep the same start sector), and then use
                > the "ext2resize" command on that partition.
                >
                > The new SD image is only part of the fast boot optimizations, as
                we
                > have tweaked the TS-SDBOOT bootup firmware as well. To update to
                > the new TS-SDBOOT, download and run (as root) the following binary
                > executable on your TS-7300 board:
                >
                > ftp://ftp.embeddedARM.com/sdboot-update-7-6-2006
                >
                > The new SD image will look at the state of jumper 6. If JP6 is
                on,
                > the full Debian bootup will be bypassed and the system will
                instead
                > drop straight to a shell prompt. 1.69 seconds after power-on the
                > serial console prompt is active and 2.41 seconds after power-on
                the
                > video console is displayed. Video takes a bit longer to start up
                > due to the fact that the FPGA must be initialized, a splash screen
                > is displayed, and USB keyboard kernel modules must be loaded. To
                > initiate a full Debian startup, simply type "exit" at either the
                > shell prompt on the serial port or the shell prompt on the VGA
                > monitor (using the USB keyboard)
                >
                > The time it takes for bootup is also displayed right before the SH
                > prompt is printed. On new Rev C CPLD TS-7300's, the CPLD has a 32-
                > bit counter that starts at 0 at poweron and is used to measure the
                > bootup time extremely accurately. On other boards, the EP9302
                > 983Khz debug4 timer is used since it starts out as 0 also, but is
                > slightly less accurate than the 32-bit 14.7Mhz counter implemented
                > in the new CPLD rev.
                >
                > If you want something other than a shell prompt running as soon as
                > possible on bootup, it is possible by editing the /linuxrc2 shell
                > script on the initrd. When you do the fast boot, you are actually
                > booting to an initrd with the Debian parts of filesystem mounted
                > read-only. After modifying the /linuxrc2 shell script on the
                > initrd, run the "save" command to save the initrd back to the SD
                > card, otherwise your changes won't "stick".
                >
                > //Jesse Off
                >
              • I R
                We just started shipping TS-7400 s today, and were able to squeeze a 34% faster bootup on the 7400 than we have on the 7300. The TS-7400 is currently booting
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 3, 2006
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                  We just started shipping TS-7400's today, and were able to squeeze a
                  34% faster bootup on the 7400 than we have on the 7300. The TS-7400
                  is currently booting to a Linux shell prompt in 1.10 seconds.

                  //Jesse Off
                  According to your website, TS-7400-64-32F has  64 MB Flash. Is it right?


                  Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2ยข/min or less.

                • Jesse Off
                  ... squeeze a ... 7400 ... it right? That part number has 64 MBytes of RAM, not flash. We ve built our first run of boards with 32MB flash though we could
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 3, 2006
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                    >> We just started shipping TS-7400's today, and were able to
                    squeeze a
                    >> 34% faster bootup on the 7400 than we have on the 7300. The TS-
                    7400
                    >> is currently booting to a Linux shell prompt in 1.10 seconds.

                    > According to your website, TS-7400-64-32F has 64 MB Flash. Is
                    it right?

                    That part number has 64 MBytes of RAM, not flash. We've built our
                    first run of boards with 32MB flash though we could build the TS-
                    7400 with up to a gigabyte of onboard flash. Perhaps in the future
                    we may do that, but with an SD slot, theres not much a point. SD
                    flash is less expensive than onboard NAND flash and its user
                    replaceable/upgradeable.

                    Could you point us to the web page that says 64MB flash? Perhaps we
                    have a web problem -- I just did a quick check on our website and
                    find no mention of 64MB flash offering.

                    //Jesse Off
                  • PeterElliot
                    ... we ... Jesse, The description of the TS-7400-64-32F on the order form states : TS-7400 SBC with 64 MB RAM and 64 MB Flash . Obviously the 32F would mean
                    Message 9 of 10 , Oct 3, 2006
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                      --- In ts-7000@yahoogroups.com, "Jesse Off" <joff@...> wrote:

                      > Could you point us to the web page that says 64MB flash? Perhaps
                      we
                      > have a web problem -- I just did a quick check on our website and
                      > find no mention of 64MB flash offering.


                      Jesse,

                      The description of the 'TS-7400-64-32F' on the order form states :
                      'TS-7400 SBC with 64 MB RAM and 64 MB Flash'. Obviously the 32F would
                      mean 32MB Flash, but the description states otherwise.

                      Regards,

                      PJE
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