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Post Game Comments - 3 Apr - Aliens: This Time Its War (&) The Twelve Doctors

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  • Richard Pardoe
    A chance tonight to play a couple of Mark Chaplin s PnP asymmetric (Attack-Defense) card games. In general, each player has a deck of cards and is battling
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 3, 2013
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      A chance tonight to play a couple of Mark Chaplin’s PnP asymmetric (Attack-Defense) card games.  In general, each player has a deck of cards and is battling over a battlegrounds/cards in the middle of the table.  Cards generally are attack cards (adding to one’s strength) or one-time event cards which usually add, remove, or adjust the play area.  But each game is based upon a popular science fiction theme.

       

      Aliens: This Time Its War has the Colonial Marines trying to survive the Aliens as they seek to live long enough to survive.  The Marine player has a limited number (16) of marines and the loss of all will spell the end of the game.  The Alien player loses if the Marines last until they are evacuated and/or the nukes are dropped from space to blow up the planet.  While the marine player can only play 3 cards to their side of the tableau, the Aliens can play as many as they wish.  As a result, the Aliens do tend to swarm and overwhelm the Marines who literally are trading bodies for time hoping they can reach the end of the time track.  In fact, I think I (as the Marines) spent too much effort trying to defend at the start rather than keeping the more powerful cards for later in the game where it would be more useful.  Tim did a good job swarming as the Aliens, wearing the Marines down, and eventually killing Bishop early enough to declare victory.

      (NB:  This game was rethemed by White Goblin/Stronghold and sold as Revolution.  Now the Aliens are the good guys (the Sheriff) who is trying to kill/eliminate the bad guys (the Outlaws); but I think the Aliens theme works so much better.

       

      The Twelve Doctors: Doctor Who Card Game has the Master and other DW baddies attacking one of three locations (Past Earth, Gallifrey, Present & Future Earth) hoping to exhaust the Doctor’s deck.  The Doctor and his companions are trying to defend these attacks and exhaust the Master’s deck.  The twist here is that each side can “regenerate” into the next incarnation of the character from the series gaining a modest power while doing so.  This one has a much different feel to it.  There is no time track as in Aliens (other than the decks) instead the Master slowly but surely is building his forces in an attempt to overcome the Doctor.  So while the early game felt frustrating for the Master as he was forced to regenerate a few times, the combination of the attacks did start to overwhelm the Doctor who found himself with too few cards to effectively counter the threat and lost the game.  (Well played by Tim again.)  The theme does work, but it is a much different feel to the above game. 

       

      Of the two, I think Aliens works a bit better.  One can see the time track more efficiently and it felt like the movie it attempted to mimic with Alien hordes battling a modest Marine force who must get good combinations at the right time to win.  And to do so might involve the occasional sacrifice (short term loss for a longer term gain).  The Doctor Who game felt a bit more static, but with a definite shift from Doctor overly strong to Master strong.  Of course, that is likely to change as the known threats in each deck is better understood and prepared for.  Would readily play either game again.

       

      Finally (and I will repeat this on the weekend) – I will not be able to host next Wednesday, so see everyone in 2 weeks.

       

      -          Rich

    • thedesign3r
      Boy I missed a good game nite! Lawrence
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 6, 2013
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        Boy I missed a good game nite!


        Lawrence

        --- In trivalleygamers@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Pardoe" <RPardoe@...> wrote:
        >
        > A chance tonight to play a couple of Mark Chaplin's PnP asymmetric
        > (Attack-Defense) card games. In general, each player has a deck of cards
        > and is battling over a battlegrounds/cards in the middle of the table.
        > Cards generally are attack cards (adding to one's strength) or one-time
        > event cards which usually add, remove, or adjust the play area. But each
        > game is based upon a popular science fiction theme.
        >
        >
        >
        > Aliens: This Time Its War has the Colonial Marines trying to survive the
        > Aliens as they seek to live long enough to survive. The Marine player has a
        > limited number (16) of marines and the loss of all will spell the end of the
        > game. The Alien player loses if the Marines last until they are evacuated
        > and/or the nukes are dropped from space to blow up the planet. While the
        > marine player can only play 3 cards to their side of the tableau, the Aliens
        > can play as many as they wish. As a result, the Aliens do tend to swarm and
        > overwhelm the Marines who literally are trading bodies for time hoping they
        > can reach the end of the time track. In fact, I think I (as the Marines)
        > spent too much effort trying to defend at the start rather than keeping the
        > more powerful cards for later in the game where it would be more useful.
        > Tim did a good job swarming as the Aliens, wearing the Marines down, and
        > eventually killing Bishop early enough to declare victory.
        >
        > (NB: This game was rethemed by White Goblin/Stronghold and sold as
        > Revolution. Now the Aliens are the good guys (the Sheriff) who is trying to
        > kill/eliminate the bad guys (the Outlaws); but I think the Aliens theme
        > works so much better.
        >
        >
        >
        > The Twelve Doctors: Doctor Who Card Game has the Master and other DW baddies
        > attacking one of three locations (Past Earth, Gallifrey, Present & Future
        > Earth) hoping to exhaust the Doctor's deck. The Doctor and his companions
        > are trying to defend these attacks and exhaust the Master's deck. The twist
        > here is that each side can "regenerate" into the next incarnation of the
        > character from the series gaining a modest power while doing so. This one
        > has a much different feel to it. There is no time track as in Aliens (other
        > than the decks) instead the Master slowly but surely is building his forces
        > in an attempt to overcome the Doctor. So while the early game felt
        > frustrating for the Master as he was forced to regenerate a few times, the
        > combination of the attacks did start to overwhelm the Doctor who found
        > himself with too few cards to effectively counter the threat and lost the
        > game. (Well played by Tim again.) The theme does work, but it is a much
        > different feel to the above game.
        >
        >
        >
        > Of the two, I think Aliens works a bit better. One can see the time track
        > more efficiently and it felt like the movie it attempted to mimic with Alien
        > hordes battling a modest Marine force who must get good combinations at the
        > right time to win. And to do so might involve the occasional sacrifice
        > (short term loss for a longer term gain). The Doctor Who game felt a bit
        > more static, but with a definite shift from Doctor overly strong to Master
        > strong. Of course, that is likely to change as the known threats in each
        > deck is better understood and prepared for. Would readily play either game
        > again.
        >
        >
        >
        > Finally (and I will repeat this on the weekend) - I will not be able to host
        > next Wednesday, so see everyone in 2 weeks.
        >
        >
        >
        > - Rich
        >
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