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Re: [T TBS R] Valve Clearances

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  • mickmaguire66
    for direct acting cams the use of shims to take up the clearance rather than some sort of dial in adjuster comes purely down to cost. sure you can use a
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 6 7:03 PM
      for direct acting cams the use of shims to take up the clearance
      rather than some sort of dial in adjuster comes purely down to cost.
      sure you can use a hydraulic lifter as well, but again these are
      expensive. In pushrod engines it didnt cost very mch to add some
      adjustment into the tappets, but adjustable bucket tappets require
      much more high tech. the reason that the cams are direct acting is
      that you gain much more stable, precise valve timing so can gain
      better performance from the engine. For mechanics doing it on a
      regular basis valve shimming is no big deal, the key is to have a
      good supply of all sizes of shim.

      HTH
      /\/\ick
    • Niles Reichardt
      Mick- Good answer. Thanks. ... From: mickmaguire66 [mailto:mick_s_maguire@hotmail.com] Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2002 7:04 PM To:
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 6 7:09 PM
        Mick-
        Good answer. Thanks.

        -----Original Message-----
        From: mickmaguire66 [mailto:mick_s_maguire@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, August 06, 2002 7:04 PM
        To: triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [T TBS R] Valve Clearances


        for direct acting cams the use of shims to take up the clearance
        rather than some sort of dial in adjuster comes purely down to cost.
        sure you can use a hydraulic lifter as well, but again these are
        expensive. In pushrod engines it didnt cost very mch to add some
        adjustment into the tappets, but adjustable bucket tappets require
        much more high tech. the reason that the cams are direct acting is
        that you gain much more stable, precise valve timing so can gain
        better performance from the engine. For mechanics doing it on a
        regular basis valve shimming is no big deal, the key is to have a
        good supply of all sizes of shim.

        HTH
        /\/\ick



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      • macboots
        There is a slight loss in power using hydraulic self-adjusters. Not entirely sure why, anyone else know? ... some time; but never bothered to bring up. What
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 7 8:51 AM
          There is a slight loss in power using hydraulic self-adjusters. Not
          entirely sure why, anyone else know?

          --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@y..., "Niles Reichardt"
          <nlr@v...> wrote:
          > This brings up a philosophical question that I have pondered for
          some time; but never bothered to bring up. What is the mechanical
          advantage of adjusting valves with shims?? I've got to admit I kinda
          think it may be taking the "proven technology" idea a bit too far. I
          guess I can see that self-adjusting valves could self-screw up. Does
          this just add more of that English character to the bike or what??
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: macboots [mailto:no_reply@y...]
          > Sent: Monday, August 05, 2002 6:39 PM
          > To: triumphthunderbirdsportriders@y...
          > Subject: [T TBS R] Valve Clearances
          >
          >
          > Just did my first valve clearance check at 9k miles...
          >
          > Two inlet valves were 0.05mm and one exhaust was 0.12mm. All
          others
          > were in spec.
          >
          > I've never heard of anyone else finding out of spec valve
          clearances
          > on the first check, and 0.05 mm on an inlet sounds pretty gross
          out
          > (0.1mm-0.15mm is the spec). Naturally I'm going to get some shims
          > (and the tool), but I wonder if I did something wrong when I
          checked
          > them... (wouldn't be the first time, I know how to turn a wrench,
          but
          > am no mechanical prodigy)
          >
          > I rotated each set of cams until they were pointing away from the
          > cylinders, just like the shop manuals says, and then measured the
          > gap. One inlet was actually 0.03mm the first time I measured it,
          but
          > after rotating the bucket holding the shim in place it came up to
          > 0.05mm.
          >
          > Anyone else have a similiar experience? Perhaps they were just
          lazy
          > the day they put my bike together?
          >
          > - Will
          > '99 TBS
          > '88 Jaguar XJS Convertible
          >
          >
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > triumphthunderbirdsportriders-unsubscribe@y...
          >
          >
          >
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        • tbirdsp
          Since there s what amounts to a fluid coupling in the valve train, the valve timing isn t as precise as the solid mechanical linkage. Explained better in the
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 7 9:03 AM
            Since there's what amounts to a fluid coupling in the valve train,
            the valve timing isn't as precise as the solid mechanical linkage.
            Explained better in the previous post by Mick.
            Mike Stenger '98 TBS


            --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@y..., macboots <no_reply@y...>
            wrote:
            > There is a slight loss in power using hydraulic self-adjusters.
            Not
            > entirely sure why, anyone else know?
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