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Diagnosis?

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  • petermholmes
    Apologies in advance for the cross posting, but I m getting desperate because... Joy of joys, I m now down to 0 of 2 Thunderbird Sports functioning. Went to
    Message 1 of 8 , May 1 9:48 AM
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      Apologies in advance for the cross posting, but I'm getting desperate because...

      Joy of joys, I'm now down to 0 of 2 Thunderbird Sports functioning.

      Went to start the yellow one Friday, gas started pouring out. Got it started, rode it around for a few miles, using my left hand on the gas tap as the float needle, trying to get the float needle to shake loose, finally gave up. That one's in a generic bike repair shop because my "official Triumph dealer" (Spitzie's, Albany, NY) refuses to service Hinckleys which are older than when he became a Triumph dealer in 2009.

      The blue one (which also had gas pouring out of it when I went to start it this year, but in that case the needle did shake loose) has been backfiring through one of the carbs occasionally, but typically only after prolonged periods at low load and low rpm. The coils were all replaced last year (along with the ignition pickup which literally came unglued).

      Yesterday I took it out and, after warming it up thoroughly, ran it up through the gears in a nice empty spot of road. Bike did not want to go over about 105 mph and, after about 15 seconds or so at full throttle, one of the cylinders quit...almost.

      At idle, I have a reasonably happy 885cc Triumph. At anything above idle, almost as soon as I start to open the throttle I have a 590cc Triumph.

      For what it's worth, the bike did the same thing last fall, but I kept riding and, eventually, after about 15 miles, it started working again. This year, no joy, even after dumping a load of STP carb cleaner in and riding the 50 miles home.

      Anybody have any thoughts?
    • TERRY GINN ADVERTISING
      I have a 2001 Adventurer and for years I shut off my fuel every time I stop. Been a habit on many bikes since I started riding in the late 70 s. If you think
      Message 2 of 8 , May 1 1:30 PM
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        I have a 2001 Adventurer and for years I shut off my fuel every time I stop.
        Been a habit on many bikes since I started riding in the late 70's.

        If you think it is floats and needles and you do not wish to tear down carbs.
        I have used a 'turkey baster" and filled my carbs with seafoam over night. I
        have done this twice in the past 3 years. Made a slight difference after 4
        months of sitting idle.

        I did have to replace my igniter (not cheap, went with after market) in 2009.
        Road to Myrtle beach, could not figure out why I had lost a cylinder.
        Although on two these bikes still have power amazingly enough.

        There are many articles on how to check your coils, wires and igniter.

        My two cents...

        Best of luck.

        Terry Ginn
        Kent, Ohio
        2001 Adventurer


        ________________________________
        From: petermholmes <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
        To: triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, May 1, 2011 12:48:16 PM
        Subject: [T TBS R] Diagnosis?


        Apologies in advance for the cross posting, but I'm getting desperate because...

        Joy of joys, I'm now down to 0 of 2 Thunderbird Sports functioning.

        Went to start the yellow one Friday, gas started pouring out. Got it started,
        rode it around for a few miles, using my left hand on the gas tap as the float
        needle, trying to get the float needle to shake loose, finally gave up. That
        one's in a generic bike repair shop because my "official Triumph dealer"
        (Spitzie's, Albany, NY) refuses to service Hinckleys which are older than when
        he became a Triumph dealer in 2009.

        The blue one (which also had gas pouring out of it when I went to start it this
        year, but in that case the needle did shake loose) has been backfiring through
        one of the carbs occasionally, but typically only after prolonged periods at low
        load and low rpm. The coils were all replaced last year (along with the
        ignition pickup which literally came unglued).

        Yesterday I took it out and, after warming it up thoroughly, ran it up through
        the gears in a nice empty spot of road. Bike did not want to go over about 105
        mph and, after about 15 seconds or so at full throttle, one of the cylinders
        quit...almost.

        At idle, I have a reasonably happy 885cc Triumph. At anything above idle,
        almost as soon as I start to open the throttle I have a 590cc Triumph.

        For what it's worth, the bike did the same thing last fall, but I kept riding
        and, eventually, after about 15 miles, it started working again. This year, no
        joy, even after dumping a load of STP carb cleaner in and riding the 50 miles
        home.

        Anybody have any thoughts?




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Geoff Thompson
        Definitely dirty carburettor. I rode from the UK to France around 3 years ago, had the bike serviced before I went but just outside Rouen it started to run
        Message 3 of 8 , May 1 1:53 PM
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          Definitely dirty carburettor. I rode from the UK to France around 3 years ago, had the bike serviced before I went but just outside Rouen it started to run very "lumpy". looked down and saw fuel pouring out from the carbs. Carbs then cleaned by a Triumph dealer in Rouen and it then ran fine to the South of France. Had similar problems last year with dirt in the carbs caused by rust and sealer from inside the tank- had to replace the tank as it was also leaking from a seam. Carbs then cleaned manually & ultrasonically but still did not rumn well with hesitation on acceleration. I have since had the bike dynojetted and fitted D&D 3 into 3 exhaust- bike runs great albeit very loud. The guy that dynojet tuned the bike also thoroughly cleaned the carbs and found that incorrect jets had been fitted at some time and also blocked emulsion tubes. (another Triumph dealer told me that I needed new carbs at £1400- I don't think so!!!!).
          Thorough carb clean is what you need.
          Tommotbird
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: TERRY GINN ADVERTISING
          To: triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, May 01, 2011 9:30 PM
          Subject: Re: [T TBS R] Diagnosis?



          I have a 2001 Adventurer and for years I shut off my fuel every time I stop.
          Been a habit on many bikes since I started riding in the late 70's.

          If you think it is floats and needles and you do not wish to tear down carbs.
          I have used a 'turkey baster" and filled my carbs with seafoam over night. I
          have done this twice in the past 3 years. Made a slight difference after 4
          months of sitting idle.

          I did have to replace my igniter (not cheap, went with after market) in 2009.
          Road to Myrtle beach, could not figure out why I had lost a cylinder.
          Although on two these bikes still have power amazingly enough.

          There are many articles on how to check your coils, wires and igniter.

          My two cents...

          Best of luck.

          Terry Ginn
          Kent, Ohio
          2001 Adventurer


          ________________________________
          From: petermholmes <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
          To: triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sun, May 1, 2011 12:48:16 PM
          Subject: [T TBS R] Diagnosis?

          Apologies in advance for the cross posting, but I'm getting desperate because...

          Joy of joys, I'm now down to 0 of 2 Thunderbird Sports functioning.

          Went to start the yellow one Friday, gas started pouring out. Got it started,
          rode it around for a few miles, using my left hand on the gas tap as the float
          needle, trying to get the float needle to shake loose, finally gave up. That
          one's in a generic bike repair shop because my "official Triumph dealer"
          (Spitzie's, Albany, NY) refuses to service Hinckleys which are older than when
          he became a Triumph dealer in 2009.

          The blue one (which also had gas pouring out of it when I went to start it this
          year, but in that case the needle did shake loose) has been backfiring through
          one of the carbs occasionally, but typically only after prolonged periods at low
          load and low rpm. The coils were all replaced last year (along with the
          ignition pickup which literally came unglued).

          Yesterday I took it out and, after warming it up thoroughly, ran it up through
          the gears in a nice empty spot of road. Bike did not want to go over about 105
          mph and, after about 15 seconds or so at full throttle, one of the cylinders
          quit...almost.

          At idle, I have a reasonably happy 885cc Triumph. At anything above idle,
          almost as soon as I start to open the throttle I have a 590cc Triumph.

          For what it's worth, the bike did the same thing last fall, but I kept riding
          and, eventually, after about 15 miles, it started working again. This year, no
          joy, even after dumping a load of STP carb cleaner in and riding the 50 miles
          home.

          Anybody have any thoughts?

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Gary Gavin
          I encountered two issues that caused similar running. One was too much K&N Filter Oil, gummed up the carbs. Later the carb rubbers developed cracks. New
          Message 4 of 8 , May 2 8:27 AM
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            I encountered two issues that caused similar running. One was too much K&N
            Filter Oil, gummed up the carbs. Later the carb rubbers developed cracks.
            New rubbers fixed that.
            --
            Gare
            98 TBS
            07 Mini Cooper S


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • petermholmes
            Thanks to all for your help. If I get the time, I ll have at it this weekend.
            Message 5 of 8 , May 2 5:14 PM
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              Thanks to all for your help. If I get the time, I'll have at it this weekend.
            • Niles Reichardt
              ... Peter- You might want to also check the spark in your plugs. Modern ceramics can loose their insulation after being fuel fouled, and not look all gummy. I
              Message 6 of 8 , May 2 9:53 PM
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                On May 2, 2011, at 5:14 PM, petermholmes wrote:

                > Thanks to all for your help. If I get the time, I'll have at it this weekend.
                >
                > __.,_.
                >
                >
                > ___



                Peter-
                You might want to also check the spark in your plugs. Modern ceramics can loose their insulation after being fuel fouled, and not look all gummy. I has happened to me.

                > ___ ]$1$I2w9OT0k$dvRfI.yTPp9gKBFFOeAH

                Niles Reichardt DVM
                Laboratory Information Systems Manager
                Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab
                nlr@...





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • petermholmes
                ... Thanks for the tip, Niles. Although the plugs were replaced last summer, the blue bike does run rich by nature and, as luck would have it, I ve got a
                Message 7 of 8 , May 3 9:23 PM
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                  > You might want to also check the spark in your plugs.

                  Thanks for the tip, Niles. Although the plugs were replaced last summer, the blue bike does run rich by nature and, as luck would have it, I've got a spare trio laying around. May as well throw them in as long as I'm in there.
                • petermholmes
                  ... Carbs it was indeed. About 100 more miles of spirited riding and some Seafoam conviced the engine to suck in and spit out whatever was blocking the jet.
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 13 10:44 PM
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                    > Definitely dirty carburettor.

                    Carbs it was indeed. About 100 more miles of spirited riding and some Seafoam conviced the engine to suck in and spit out whatever was blocking the jet. I think I'll be running part Seafoam in my tank for at least a few more tanks full...

                    Thanks again to all for your help.
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