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OH!!! So wht?

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  • McGurk
    What s the difference between a generic TBird and a TBS? If you are or were a generic TBird rider the only differences were visual and cosmetic. Triumph
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 25, 2010
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      What's the difference between a generic TBird and a TBS? If you are or were a generic TBird rider the only differences were visual and cosmetic.

      Triumph Thunderbird 2002 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 53 69 chain steel spine w/rear sub-frame 62.2 telescopic forks single, preload adj. laced 320mm disc w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston cal. 528 485 no 4 29.5 6 3 (36) 38 13.23@99.7

      Triumph Thunderbird Sport 1999 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 52.4* 72* chain steel spine w/rear sub-frame 62.2 3-way adj. telescopic forks single, 3-way adj. alloy laced 2-310mm discs w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston cal. 537 494 no 4 31.1 6 3 (36) 38 12.22@?

      A whole second in the 1/4 mile? But then again, who am I to go against the wind?
    • John Shaw
      Sport has 6 speed transmission, and more adjustments on suspension too. From: triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 25, 2010
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        Sport has 6 speed transmission, and more adjustments on suspension too.



        From: triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of McGurk
        Sent: November 25, 2010 6:55 PM
        To: triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [T TBS R] OH!!! So wht?





        What's the difference between a generic TBird and a TBS? If you are or were
        a generic TBird rider the only differences were visual and cosmetic.

        Triumph Thunderbird 2002 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 53 69 chain steel spine
        w/rear sub-frame 62.2 telescopic forks single, preload adj. laced 320mm disc
        w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston cal. 528 485 no 4 29.5 6 3 (36) 38
        13.23@99.7 <mailto:13.23%4099.7>

        Triumph Thunderbird Sport 1999 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 52.4* 72* chain steel
        spine w/rear sub-frame 62.2 3-way adj. telescopic forks single, 3-way adj.
        alloy laced 2-310mm discs w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston cal. 537 494
        no 4 31.1 6 3 (36) 38 12.22@?

        A whole second in the 1/4 mile? But then again, who am I to go against the
        wind?





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Denny
        Riding position Brakes Suspension Tire/wheel size Advertised horsepower difference is a Myth fabricated by marketing. You ll notice the difference in handling
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 25, 2010
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          Riding position
          Brakes
          Suspension
          Tire/wheel size
          Advertised horsepower difference is a Myth fabricated by marketing.

          You'll notice the difference in handling the most.

          Cosmetically there are many little differences that do not effect performance.

          beginning in 2000 Standard TBird got the 6 speed Transmission.






          --On November 25, 2010 11:55:19 PM +0000 McGurk <kidmcgurk@...> wrote:

          > What's the difference between a generic TBird and a TBS? If you are or were
          > a generic TBird rider the only differences were visual and cosmetic.
          >
          > Triumph Thunderbird 2002 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 53 69 chain steel
          > spine w/rear sub-frame 62.2 telescopic forks single, preload adj. laced
          > 320mm disc w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston cal. 528 485 no 4
          > 29.5 6 3 (36) 38 13.23@99.7
          >
          > Triumph Thunderbird Sport 1999 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 52.4* 72* chain
          > steel spine w/rear sub-frame 62.2 3-way adj. telescopic forks single,
          > 3-way adj. alloy laced 2-310mm discs w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston
          > cal. 537 494 no 4 31.1 6 3 (36) 38 12.22@?
          >
          > A whole second in the 1/4 mile? But then again, who am I to go against the
          > wind?
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >



          Thanks,
          Denny
        • vwvvi
          Heard a lot about the marketing myth between TBS and TBird. I have an 04 TBS with TOR pipes, and friend has an 03 TBird with TOR pipes. So . . . equivalent
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 26, 2010
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            Heard a lot about the marketing myth between TBS and TBird. I have an '04 TBS with TOR pipes, and friend has an '03 TBird with TOR pipes. So . . . equivalent bikes, right? Nope, the TBS pulls stronger right from the get go, and after the TBird has run out of power the TBS is still pulling to 120mph+. Suspension on the TBS is fully adjustable, riding position significantly different, and besides, I love my TBS :-)


            --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com, Denny <dennyhenderson@...> wrote:
            >
            > Riding position
            > Brakes
            > Suspension
            > Tire/wheel size
            > Advertised horsepower difference is a Myth fabricated by marketing.
            >
            > You'll notice the difference in handling the most.
            >
            > Cosmetically there are many little differences that do not effect performance.
            >
            > beginning in 2000 Standard TBird got the 6 speed Transmission.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --On November 25, 2010 11:55:19 PM +0000 McGurk <kidmcgurk@...> wrote:
            >
            > > What's the difference between a generic TBird and a TBS? If you are or were
            > > a generic TBird rider the only differences were visual and cosmetic.
            > >
            > > Triumph Thunderbird 2002 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 53 69 chain steel
            > > spine w/rear sub-frame 62.2 telescopic forks single, preload adj. laced
            > > 320mm disc w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston cal. 528 485 no 4
            > > 29.5 6 3 (36) 38 13.23@...
            > >
            > > Triumph Thunderbird Sport 1999 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 52.4* 72* chain
            > > steel spine w/rear sub-frame 62.2 3-way adj. telescopic forks single,
            > > 3-way adj. alloy laced 2-310mm discs w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston
            > > cal. 537 494 no 4 31.1 6 3 (36) 38 12.22@?
            > >
            > > A whole second in the 1/4 mile? But then again, who am I to go against the
            > > wind?
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Denny
            >
          • Robert
            I have a 2002 T-Bird; I love reading this groups posts. I test rode a TBS, then bought a T-Bird, because of the riding position. I m an old Bonneville rider,
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 27, 2010
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              I have a 2002 T-Bird; I love reading this groups' posts. I test rode a TBS, then bought a T-Bird, because of the riding position. I'm an old Bonneville rider, and wanted the same riding feel. I believe the T-Bird has softer cams, which gives it more grunt at lower RPMs. For this, top horsepower is sacrificed. I love riding the T-Bird, there's (almost) nothing else I'd rather do. 28,000 miles, only problem was with the Gill coils. Be safe out there...

              --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com, "vwvvi" <vwvvi@...> wrote:
              >
              > Heard a lot about the marketing myth between TBS and TBird. I have an '04 TBS with TOR pipes, and friend has an '03 TBird with TOR pipes. So . . . equivalent bikes, right? Nope, the TBS pulls stronger right from the get go, and after the TBird has run out of power the TBS is still pulling to 120mph+. Suspension on the TBS is fully adjustable, riding position significantly different, and besides, I love my TBS :-)
              >
              >
              > --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com, Denny <dennyhenderson@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Riding position
              > > Brakes
              > > Suspension
              > > Tire/wheel size
              > > Advertised horsepower difference is a Myth fabricated by marketing.
              > >
              > > You'll notice the difference in handling the most.
              > >
              > > Cosmetically there are many little differences that do not effect performance.
              > >
              > > beginning in 2000 Standard TBird got the 6 speed Transmission.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --On November 25, 2010 11:55:19 PM +0000 McGurk <kidmcgurk@> wrote:
              > >
              > > > What's the difference between a generic TBird and a TBS? If you are or were
              > > > a generic TBird rider the only differences were visual and cosmetic.
              > > >
              > > > Triumph Thunderbird 2002 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 53 69 chain steel
              > > > spine w/rear sub-frame 62.2 telescopic forks single, preload adj. laced
              > > > 320mm disc w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston cal. 528 485 no 4
              > > > 29.5 6 3 (36) 38 13.23@
              > > >
              > > > Triumph Thunderbird Sport 1999 885 l-c, dohc, inline 3 52.4* 72* chain
              > > > steel spine w/rear sub-frame 62.2 3-way adj. telescopic forks single,
              > > > 3-way adj. alloy laced 2-310mm discs w/2 piston cal. 285mm disc w/2 piston
              > > > cal. 537 494 no 4 31.1 6 3 (36) 38 12.22@?
              > > >
              > > > A whole second in the 1/4 mile? But then again, who am I to go against the
              > > > wind?
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ------------------------------------
              > > >
              > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Thanks,
              > > Denny
              > >
              >
            • petermholmes
              ... As a guy who s had a LegendTT, ridden many miles on a Tbird, and currently owns Tbird Sports, this is one case where the numbers tell you next to nothing.
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 28, 2010
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                > What's the difference between a generic TBird and a TBS?
                > If you are or were a generic TBird rider the only
                > differences were visual and cosmetic.

                As a guy who's had a LegendTT, ridden many miles on a Tbird, and currently owns Tbird Sports, this is one case where the numbers tell you next to nothing.

                The engines of all of the above are virtually identical, the differences in acceleration are at best minimal, and I really could care less whether my front wheel has one brake rotor or two. BUT the Tbird Sport's ride and handling is *far* superior to that of any of the other "classic" triples.

                IMHO. YMMV.
              • Woody Sutherland
                I have a slow oil leak on the left side of my 1999 Thunderbird Sport, and I m having a problem finding the source. There s a drop on the bottom of the
                Message 7 of 13 , May 7, 2012
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                  I have a slow oil leak on the left side of my 1999 Thunderbird Sport,
                  and I'm having a problem finding the source. There's a drop on the
                  bottom of the alternator and then most of the left side of the engine is
                  wet from there down. I imagine there is a seal behind the alternator. Is
                  this a common problem? Or is there somewhere else I should be looking?

                  thanks,
                  Woody Sutherland
                  San Diego
                • Reichardt, Niles
                  On May 7, 2012, at 8:08 AM, Woody Sutherland wrote: Or is there somewhere else I should be looking? Have you drained the air box? That can often masquerade as
                  Message 8 of 13 , May 7, 2012
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                    On May 7, 2012, at 8:08 AM, Woody Sutherland wrote:

                    Or is there somewhere else I should be looking?

                    Have you drained the air box? That can often masquerade as a oil leak.


                    Niles


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Woody Sutherland
                    Not sure what you mean by draining the air box. Obviously, I have not done it. thanks, Woody
                    Message 9 of 13 , May 7, 2012
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                      Not sure what you mean by draining the air box. Obviously, I have not
                      done it.

                      thanks,
                      Woody


                      On 05/07/2012 09:09 AM, Reichardt, Niles wrote:
                      >
                      > On May 7, 2012, at 8:08 AM, Woody Sutherland wrote:
                      >
                      > Or is there somewhere else I should be looking?
                      >
                      > Have you drained the air box? That can often masquerade as a oil leak.
                      >
                      > Niles
                      >
                    • Reichardt, Niles
                      On May 7, 2012, at 9:20 AM, Woody Sutherland wrote: Not sure what you mean by draining the air box. Obviously, I have not done it. Woody- The air-box is the
                      Message 10 of 13 , May 7, 2012
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                        On May 7, 2012, at 9:20 AM, Woody Sutherland wrote:

                        Not sure what you mean by draining the air box. Obviously, I have not
                        done it.


                        Woody-
                        The air-box is the black plastic thing behind the carburetors. It vents the crankcase and can collect oil. There is a black rubber tube that runs from the bottom of the air-box and hangs down under the frame in front of the rear tire. About 1� up there is a plug. If you work the plug out it will drain any oil out of the air-box, and that may solve your problem.


                        Niles



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Reichardt, Niles
                        On May 7, 2012, at 9:30 AM, Reichardt, Niles wrote: About 1‰ up there is a plug That is supposed to be 1 inch. Apparently yahoo cant handle quote marks.
                        Message 11 of 13 , May 7, 2012
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                          On May 7, 2012, at 9:30 AM, Reichardt, Niles wrote:

                          About 1� up there is a plug

                          That is supposed to be 1 inch. Apparently yahoo cant handle quote marks.


                          Niles Reichardt, DVM
                          Laboratory Information Systems Manager
                          Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab
                          (509) 335-2409
                          nlr@...<http://tmed.wsu.edu>






                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Woody Sutherland
                          I understand now. I ll drain it tonight when I get home. thanks much, Woody
                          Message 12 of 13 , May 7, 2012
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                            I understand now. I'll drain it tonight when I get home.

                            thanks much,
                            Woody



                            On 05/07/2012 09:30 AM, Reichardt, Niles wrote:
                            >
                            > On May 7, 2012, at 9:20 AM, Woody Sutherland wrote:
                            >
                            > Not sure what you mean by draining the air box. Obviously, I have not
                            > done it.
                            >
                            >
                            > Woody-
                            > The air-box is the black plastic thing behind the carburetors. It vents the crankcase and can collect oil. There is a black rubber tube that runs from the bottom of the air-box and hangs down under the frame in front of the rear tire. About 1” up there is a plug. If you work the plug out it will drain any oil out of the air-box, and that may solve your problem.
                            >
                            >
                            > Niles
                            >
                          • stowcreek62
                            Woody... I have a 1996 Trophy (same engine)that had a small leak. I would see it on the exhaust pipe near the sidestand mount/alternator. It was the alternator
                            Message 13 of 13 , May 10, 2012
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                              Woody...
                              I have a 1996 Trophy (same engine)that had a small leak. I would see it on the exhaust pipe near the sidestand mount/alternator. It was the alternator 'O' ring which was the problem. Not a lot of oil, and more a nuisance than anything else. No more oil leak after replacing the "O" ring.
                              Glenn

                              --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com, Woody Sutherland <motowoodys@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I have a slow oil leak on the left side of my 1999 Thunderbird Sport,
                              > and I'm having a problem finding the source. There's a drop on the
                              > bottom of the alternator and then most of the left side of the engine is
                              > wet from there down. I imagine there is a seal behind the alternator. Is
                              > this a common problem? Or is there somewhere else I should be looking?
                              >
                              > thanks,
                              > Woody Sutherland
                              > San Diego
                              >
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