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RE: [T TBS R] Diagnostic opinion, Coils?? !!

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  • Alec Gore
    Testing coils isn t difficult because the bad coil only affects one cylinder (unless you ve got two going together, which is unlikely). To test, swap the
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 20, 2006
      Testing coils isn't difficult because the bad coil only affects
      one cylinder (unless you've got two going together, which is
      unlikely). To test, swap the suspected bad one to a different
      cylinder and notice if the problem transfers to that cylinder.

      Your symptoms do sound like my experience with coil failure.
      Coils can fail one after another and yet you could be left with
      the third one still good forever. Yes, the ignition pick-up is
      also a possibility, but that would be affecting all cylinders
      firing.

      Regards

      Alec
    • jimmyj900
      ... wrote:If you have ... appreciated!
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 22, 2006
        --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff"
        <jdwath@...> wrote:If you have
        >> any other tips on carb removal etc. ..that would be much
        appreciated! <<

        Carb removal sucks on these bikes-- no two ways about that -- but
        it's also a good time to check and/or replace your air filter.

        Also, check on whether you've got Mikuni (stock) or Keihin (later
        model) carbs. If you've got Mikunis then look closely at the carb
        rubbers between the carbs and engine. If there are dimples in the
        sides (about the diameter of a cigarette) they're the restricted
        rubbers and it would also be a good time to replace them with the non-
        restricted ones. Order the rubbers from the Tiger model of the same
        year since they're non-restricted and will give you a bit more top-
        end performance.

        First, remove the seat, fuel tank and side covers.

        Second, remove the airbox under the left side cover. There's a screw
        on top and a rubber fitting with a couple of hose clamps at the front
        of the airbox.

        That gets you to the carbs themselves.

        There are two rubber vent hoses that run from the carbs over the
        notch in the filter box and down under the frame. Lift those out of
        the way since the filter box can't move back far enough with the
        hoses in place.

        Disconnect the choke cable and stick the end behind the cylinder head
        water pipe to hold it out of the way.

        Loosen the clamps on carburetor side of the carb rubbers unless
        you're replacing them.

        Loosen the clamps between the carbs and filter box.

        Slide the carbs and filter box back (as a unit!) until the filter box
        hits the frame.

        Separate the carbs from the filter box and slide/wiggle them out the
        left side of the bike.

        With a 10mm wrench, loosen the adjustment lock nut on the throttle
        cable end (that's the lower nut.) Stick a finger under the carb rail
        to hold the lower nut and loosen the throttle cable some more.

        Hold the carb butterflies open (I use the big end of a screwdriver)
        and unhook the throttle cable, then push the adjuster nut back to
        release it from the carb rail. You may also have to push the vent
        tube away from the throttle connection, but the "T connector should
        rotate."

        Also, some folks prefer to disconnect the throttle cable at the grip
        and remove the cable with the carbs so that's an option that might be
        simpler since you don't have the proper tool for manipulating the
        cable through the slot.

        Check your throttle cable end for broken strands and rust and DON'T
        HESITATE TO REPLACE IT if it's not perfect. It truly sucks having a
        broken throttle cable in the boonies and having to ride home on the
        idle adjustment!

        This is also a good time to oil the cable. (HINT, HINT...)

        Replacing the carbs is the reverse process. TIP: Adding a thin smear
        of engine oil to mating surfaces of the carb rubbers will help things
        along.

        On my website, I'll be offering a special cable tool for connecting
        and disconnecting the throttle cable that makes it a quick and easy
        process, but that's a month or so down the line. ;^}

        Any questions, don't hesitate to ask here rather than in e-mail.
        Everybody benefits from open discussion!

        Jim
      • jimmyj900
        ... a later trip to the dealer another parts person says that the only thing you might need when cleaning the carbs is the float bowl gasket...
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 22, 2006
          --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com, arieldunwright
          <no_reply@...> wrote:

          >>there's no such thing as a rebuild kit for Keihin carbs, but... On
          a later trip to the dealer another parts person says that the only
          thing you might need when cleaning the carbs is the float bowl
          gasket...<<

          I've had my Keihin carbs apart at least 100 times for jetting
          experiments and am still using the stock bowl gasket.

          The 'trick' is in tightening the bowl screws. You MUST do it in
          steps with a 'star' pattern to the tightening. If you torque the
          screws in one step and in a roatation around the bowl cover, you'll
          warp the cover.

          Tighten one screw lightly tight, then the diagonal screw, then the
          opposite screw and then the other diagonal. Torque them in three
          steps and that cover will stay flat with no damage to the gasket.

          Jim
        • Todd Luchette
          http://www.webbikeworld.com/tbird/air-filter/ I think this says it all: I ve done a lot of motorcycle maintenance in my time, but replacing the air filter on
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 22, 2006
            http://www.webbikeworld.com/tbird/air-filter/

            I think this says it all:

            I've done a lot of motorcycle maintenance in my time, but replacing
            the air filter on my 1999 Triumph Thunderbird Sport probably ranks as
            one of the most frustrating mechanical experiences ever.

            Watch out for refitting the carbs up to the airbox and the intakes to
            the cylinder. Take care that you don't scrape dirt/rubber from the
            hoses so that it gets into the carbs or the cylinders (if this sounds
            like I'm speaking from personal experience, there is a good reason).



            On Dec 21, 2006, at 5:09 PM, snowdallblue wrote:

            > Jeff.
            >
            > Removing the carbs on a TBS isnt that bad !!!
            > When I bought mine , off a mate, it had been standing for 18
            > months...
            > Run rough as hell, just as you describe !
            > We whipped the carbs out ,
            > Stripped the carbs , fitted new plugs also & then rode home ....325
            > miles !
            >
            > I worked out the mileage , a staggering 58 MPG !
            >
            > Just take your time & place a sheet underneath the bike to catch any
            > falling parts !!!
            > When I did mine , I left all of the cables etc attatched & hung the
            > carbs out of the left hand side , to make it easier..
            > Use carb cleaner & blow out the jets & jet housings.
            >
            > Hardest bit is removing the air box.
            > Re-assemble using copper grease , to avoid any future seized screws.
            >
            > Still a LOT easier than removing the carbs on my Kwack Z900 !!!
            >
            > Fuzz.
            >
            > .
            >
            >

            "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired,
            signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are
            not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed."
            President Dwight D. Eisenhower
            April 16, 1953




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Todd Luchette
            Mine broke 10 feet from the dealship. Lucky me. ... Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 22, 2006
              Mine broke 10 feet from the dealship. Lucky me.


              On Dec 22, 2006, at 8:58 AM, jimmyj900 wrote:

              > Check your throttle cable end for broken strands and rust and DON'T
              > HESITATE TO REPLACE IT if it's not perfect. It truly sucks having a
              > broken throttle cable in the boonies and having to ride home on the
              > idle adjustment!

              "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired,
              signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are
              not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed."
              President Dwight D. Eisenhower
              April 16, 1953




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jeff
              ... indicates ... the ... are ... dilemma..after putting lucas gas treatment my low speed jets FINALLY cleared up!!! NOW..I just repaired the
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 27, 2006
                --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com, jimmyj900
                <no_reply@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In triumphthunderbirdsportriders@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff"
                > <jdwath@> wrote:
                > >>...Bike has been stumbling,missing, stuttering at low rpms, for
                > 1500 miles, ...runs fine above 3000 rpms,always...<<
                >
                > Low rpm stumbling and clean running over 3,000 rpm usually
                indicates
                > failing ignition coils but can also indicate dirty pilot jets in
                the
                > carbs.
                >
                > If applying some choke clears up the problem then the pilot jets
                are
                > the issue, otherwise it's an ignition coil.
                >
                > jim, Thanks on the choke diagnostic....that solved my
                dilemma..after putting lucas gas treatment my low speed jets FINALLY
                cleared up!!!
                NOW..I just repaired the loosening/shearing alternator bolt; drilled
                and retap to 5/16ths then permenant loctite...40 mile ride tomorrow
                to test.........................thanx Jeff
                >




                atever) for a few minutes and then use a piece of stranded copper
                > wire as a brush since it's softer than the brass and won't scratch
                > it. A strand or two of wire will poke the gunk out of the bores
                and
                > the end of the wire does a nice job of removing the deposits above
                > the jets.
                >
                > Give the jets a solvent rinse and check them again with the
                > magnifier. If they're clean, reinstall and go for a ride to find
                out
                > if that's the only problem.
                >
                > Jim
                >
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