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Re: I installed my centerstand (2K TBird)

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  • jcatbert45
    ... Sheesh, try as I may, I haven t been able to lug the bike up on its centerstand by myself. Someone make me a movie so I can see it...lol. Myabe, I ll
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 1, 2002
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      > It took me at least a week to get used to putting it
      > up on the centerstand, but once you get the hang of it
      > it's not too bad. You just have to get all the angles
      > right. FWIW, a goldwing (650lb+) is easier to put on it's
      > center stand than a Thunderbird (450+). but it's
      > a crucial component so it's well worth the effort.
      >

      Sheesh, try as I may, I haven't been able to lug the bike up on its
      centerstand by myself. Someone make me a movie so I can see
      it...lol. Myabe, I'll challenge my mechanics when I take it in for
      it's 6K :O)

      Here's how I've tried.

      Side-stand down.

      Me on the shifter side of the bike.

      Bike in neutral.

      Straighten the wheel and get the bike upright (this is the scarey
      part because if she tips opposite me...grrrrr)

      Grab the frame by the footpegs on both sides and give it a heave
      upwards. The result is probably laughable to my neighbors.

      I am 5'8", 180 lbs. and in halfway decent shape. Try to get to the
      gym at least twice a week so I'm not a weakling. (Hey, no personal
      solicitations please....lol).

      Triumph T-Bird - 4
      Jerry - 0
    • t-bone51
      I have a 2000 Legend TT. My center stand project was last fall. Glad I did it, but experienced the same trials and tribulations you did. I must say that I
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 1, 2002
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        I have a 2000 Legend TT. My center stand project was last fall.
        Glad I did it, but experienced the same trials and tribulations you
        did. I must say that I can't believe what I did without the center
        stand. Lubing the chain, cleaning, etc, what a joy it is now.

        Keep the rubber side down.

        T-Bone

        --- In triumphmotorcycleclub2@y..., "jcatbert45" <jcatbert@a...>
        wrote:
        > I'm exhausted! Just used a small floor jack; had to remove the
        > entire exhaust system. After removing the pivot pin from the lower
        > shock, the hardest part was trying to line the danged holes up.
        > Luckily I had a helper at that particular moment. Had to detour
        and
        > take two trips to the local Auto-zone, one for a deep 13mm socket
        for
        > the header bolts on the exhaust (they were so loose coming off).
        > Then I needed one of those large torque head thingamjig and a 17mm
        > socket. It was a good time to clean the chrome on the entire
        exhaust
        > and the wheels as well. I would have paid another $500 for some
        nice
        > mag wheels and tubless tires! Man, did that ever take long and my
        > back aches! Washed the entire bike with a Windex bottle and bottle
        > brush (we have water restriction). Everything went together
        without
        > a hitch. I reused the brass (??) exhaust gaskets because they
        didn't
        > come out. No leaks :o)
        >
        > The fun part is trying to get the T-Bird up on it's
        > centerstand....lol. It ain't a one man job; no wonder it's not a
        > stock item on the T-Bird. Can any of you manly men do this
        > yourselves? Thing should have come with a winch :O) I did put it
        up
        > there to clean the wheels, chain and what-not. Sure does make that
        > job easier. Gotta say the kit and instructions were pretty
        thorough
        > (comes with lock-tite, grease, exhaust gaskets, etc.) I'm still a
        > tad confused about the torque setting for the pivot bolt. Says to
        > tighten to 100 NM. My torque wrench doesn't go that high! It tops
        > off at about 40 NM which is about 250 foot pounds. I was afraid to
        > tighten it anymore for fear of snapping it off. Anwyway, warrants
        > some research. Golly, I am BUSHED!
        >
        > Thanks to all of those that gave my advice and tips and Happy
        > Resurrection day for those that celebrate (\O/)
        >
        > - Jerry
      • Alec Gore
        Jerry, First, the Triumph stand is not well balanced and does not go over as easy as some. However, you can do it! Here s how: 1. Stop bike on side stand and
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 2, 2002
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          Jerry,

          First, the Triumph stand is not well balanced and does not go over as
          easy as some. However, you can do it!

          Here's how:

          1. Stop bike on side stand and hold with left hand on left bar.
          2. Put up side stand and place right foot firmly on main stand, bring it
          down to the ground.
          3. Raise bike until both feet of the centre stand are touching down; you
          may not feel comfortable doing this, but it is actually totally stable:
          You have 4 points in contact with the ground - both wheels and two feet
          of the main stand. Provided you keep the pressure on your right foot,
          there is no way it can go over. (Party trick! You can even remove both
          hands, but don't try that until you are confident.)
          4. As has been said, this is all in the lifting, not hauling backwards,
          so firmly push down on your right foot and, at the same time, put your
          right hand UNDER the bracket that goes to the rear passenger peg and
          lift UPWARDS.
          5. The bike will quickly rock over onto the stand all by itself. No
          rearward motion is required.

          Psych point: Visualise it happening for you before you do it :)

          Best of luck.

          Regards

          Alec
        • Alec Gore
          Is this an April Fool s tale or not?? I got it off a board here in HK. Regards Alec ===================== A senator in the US is drafting 10 points to improve
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 2, 2002
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            Is this an April Fool's tale or not?? I got it off a board here in HK.

            Regards

            Alec

            =====================

            A senator in the US is drafting 10 points to improve motorcyclist
            safety.<o:p></o:p>

            Quite controversial and a little impractical. (IMPRACTICAL! slight
            understatement Ed!)<o:p></o:p>

            SK<o:p></o:p>

            "The Motorcycle Safely Foundation is pleased to announce that Senator
            Barbara Boxer (D-CA) has agreed to be the principal author of the
            Motorcycle Safety and Child Protection Act of 2002. The bill will be
            introduced during the first week of April and will contain MSF's full
            10-point plan for improving motorcycle safety:<o:p></o:p>

            Read the letter that convinced Ms. Boxer to step in and help us.

            A Champion of Safe Motorcycling<o:p></o:p>

            1. Limiting riding to daylight hours on all roadways constructed or
            maintained with the use of any federal funds (which covers virtually all
            roadways other than those in private subdivisions).

            2. Imposing a nationwide 55 mph speed limit on all two-wheeled vehicles
            using public roadways.<o:p></o:p>

            3. A prohibition on riding in the rain or on wet roads.<o:p></o:p>

            4. Mandatory full face, DOT-approved helmet use for all riders and
            passengers.<o:p></o:p>

            5. A prohibition on passengers of less than 18 years age.<o:p></o:p>

            6. A horsepower to weight ratio limit for all new motorcycles of 0.10
            (e.g., limiting the horsepower of a 600 pound motorcycle to
            60).<o:p></o:p>

            7. Governors on all new motorcycles limiting the top speed to 75 mph
            (the highest speed currently allowed by any state).<o:p></o:p>

            8. Revising the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards to require
            anti-lock braking systems (ABS), lawn mower style (i.e., "deadman")
            throttle controls, and tipover protection devices on all new motorcycles
            beginning in 2004.<o:p></o:p>

            9. Applying passenger car emission standards to all new motorcycles by
            2008, including a requirement of 10% of each manufacturers production to
            be Zero-Emission Vehicles, powered by either batteries or hydrogen fuel
            cells.<o:p></o:p>

            10. Controlling carbon dioxide emissions from motorcycles by requiring
            Corporate Average Fuel Economy of 82.5 miles per gallon by
            2006.<o:p></o:p>

            MSF's 10-Point Plan for Motorcycle Safety will dramatically reduce death
            and injury caused by motorcycling through a coordinated series of
            cost-effective, technological solutions.<o:p></o:p>

            1. Don't Fight the Night. Riding a motorcycle in daylight is risky
            business. Riding a motorcycle at night is foolhardy. Wildlife is more
            active and harder to see. Irregularities or debris on the road surface
            are harder to see. The motorcycle itself is harder to see.<o:p></o:p>

            2. Stay Alive at 55. Responsible states, such as California, recognize
            that some vehicles are inherently more dangerous than others. That's why
            heavy trucks are limited to speeds of 55 mph in California. U.S.
            Department of Transportation statistics prove that motorcycles are far
            more dangerous than any other type of vehicle used on public roadways.
            There is no reason why motorcycles should be allowed to travel at higher
            speeds than trucks. MSF estimates that a nationwide speed limit of 55
            mph for motorcycles will reduce the annual death toll by
            26.7%.<o:p></o:p>

            3. Slippery When Wet. The inherent instability of single-track vehicles
            results in enormously increased accident risk under conditions that
            reduce traction. It's possible to quickly recover from a minor slide in
            a 4-wheeled vehicle, but as soon as a motorcycle starts to slide, it
            falls. Combined with the lack of windshield wipers and closed passenger
            compartments, motorcycles are inherently unsafe in wet weather and
            should be parked.<o:p></o:p>

            4. Protect Your Head or End Up Dead. Head injuries are the number one
            cause of death in motorcycle accidents. Riding without adequate head
            protection not only increases the risk of serious injury or death, it
            increases the chances that a helmetless motorcyclist will become a
            burden on society. Madatory use of U.S. DOT-approved full-face helmets
            will reduce deaths, reduce serious injuries, and save taxpayers
            millions.<o:p></o:p>

            5. Don't Vote/Don't Ride. Riding is not a right, it's a privilege
            granted by the government. While adults may choose to accept the
            inherent risk associated with motorcycle riding, minors cannot be
            expected to make rational decisions regarding their own safety. Like
            smoking, drinking, and other life-threatening activities, motorcycle
            riding isn't kid stuff.<o:p></o:p>

            6. Power Corrupts. Loss of control during full throttle application has
            become a common problem with "sportbikes". The horsepower race among
            motorcycle manufacturers has become sheer madness. Sportbikes have
            become virtually uncontrollable. Accidents caused by wheelstands and
            spinning rear tires even occur on race tracks with professional riders.
            No one can responsibly or legally use the horsepower available from
            current production motorcycles on public roads. It's time to put an end
            to the horsepower race and limit the power to weight ratio of
            motorcycles to that of typical passenger cars.<o:p></o:p>

            7'. Speed Kills. No where in the country is it legal to drive a
            passenger car at more than 75 mph on public roads. There is no excuse
            for motorcycles designed to break the speed limit. Speed governor
            technology is simple and effective. It needs to be put in place
            immediately.<o:p></o:p>

            8. Stay in Control With Technology. Anti-skid braking systems have been
            available technology for many years, yet only a few motorcycles are
            equipped with ABS brakes. Given the inherent instability of single-track
            vehicles, ABS should be mandatory on all new motorcycles. Other design
            changes needed to improve motorcycle safety include "deadman" throttles
            and tipover bars. Using the same technology currently required on new
            lawn mowers, motorcycles should be designed so that the engine drops to
            idle whenever a hand is removed from the handlebars. This will prevent
            dangerous stunts like riding with no hands. Simple tipover bars will
            prevent crushed ankles and knees when the unavoidable tipover eventually
            occurs. This technology is already used on certain models like the Honda
            ST1100, a motorcycle that doesn't appeal to younger riders. Most models
            do not use tipover bar technology because it is considered like
            "training wheels" by more "macho" riders.<o:p></o:p>

            9. Give a Hoot, Don't Pollute. Despite their smaller size. Motorcycles
            are allowed to pollute over ten times more per mile of travel than
            passenger cars and light trucks. There's just no excuse for that;
            children and the elderly have to breathe the fumes emitted. All new cars
            and light trucks use catalytic converters and charcoal canisters to
            limit exhaust and evaporative emissions. Motorcycles should be required
            to use the same technology.<o:p></o:p>

            10. Save the Icecaps. Motorcycles are currently exempt from the
            Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards that apply to passenger cars
            and light-duty trucks. Yet many motorcycles actually have worse fuel
            economy than some passenger cars. Cars like the Honda Insight and Toyota
            Prius are achieving over 50 mpg, yet many motorcycles achieve less than
            40 mpg. Low fuel economy means more carbon dioxide emissions, a
            greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. With the end of the
            motorcycle horsepower race, there is no reason that motorcycles can't be
            designed to use no more fuel than passenger cars on a per passenger
            basis. Since many cars and SUVs can carry six people and most
            motorcycles can carry only two people, motorcycles should be getting at
            least three times the 27.5 mpg standard that applies to cars. 82.5 mpg
            is a reasonable standard for all motorcycle manufacturers to achieve on
            a corporate average basis."
          • snslawr
            Yes, it s an April Fool s joke. I m sure Ms. Boxer would love to pass something like that (she d like to take everything remotely dangerous away from
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 2, 2002
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              Yes, it's an April Fool's joke. I'm sure Ms. Boxer would love to
              pass something like that (she'd like to take everything remotely
              dangerous away from everybody and have the federal government issue
              every American a detailed daily agenda for a completely hazard-free
              and politically correct life) however the MSF is a pro-motorcycle
              group that promotes safety through voluntary *training* which most of
              us agree is a darn good idea. Don't know who would try to insinuate
              that they share views with treacherous totalitarian enemies of every
              individual freedom (except that of the lazy to replicate their genes
              and receive entitlements for it) that is exemplified by Barbara Boxer.
            • ammomac_99
              If you look closely, it motorcycle safely, not safety. Just like the MSF portion on perception. You see what you expect to see. ;-) Mac ... of ... insinuate
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 2, 2002
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                If you look closely, it motorcycle safely, not safety.

                Just like the MSF portion on perception. You see what you expect to
                see. ;-)

                Mac


                > and politically correct life) however the MSF is a pro-motorcycle
                > group that promotes safety through voluntary *training* which most
                of
                > us agree is a darn good idea. Don't know who would try to
                insinuate
                > that they share views with treacherous totalitarian enemies of
                every
                > individual freedom (except that of the lazy to replicate their
                genes
                > and receive entitlements for it) that is exemplified by Barbara
                Boxer.
              • petermholmes
                ... HK. It could definitely be immediately classified as a blatantly obvious April Fool s joke except for the Barbara Boxer (D-CA) ; once you see the
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 2, 2002
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                  > Is this an April Fool's tale or not?? I got it off a board here in
                  HK.

                  It could definitely be immediately classified as a blatantly obvious
                  April Fool's joke except for the "Barbara Boxer (D-CA)"; once you see
                  the legislation is originating in California all bets are off. :o)
                • petermholmes
                  ... HK. It could definitely be immediately classified as a blatantly obvious April Fool s joke except for the Barbara Boxer (D-CA) ; once you see the
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 2, 2002
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                    > Is this an April Fool's tale or not?? I got it off a board here in
                    HK.

                    It could definitely be immediately classified as a blatantly obvious
                    April Fool's joke except for the "Barbara Boxer (D-CA)"; once you see
                    the legislation is originating in California all bets are off, Alec.
                    :o)

                    Regards,
                    Peter

                    P.S. How do you get so many messages onto this board? It's taken me
                    over an hour to get this one message to post.
                  • snslawr
                    Thx Mac I didn t notice that at first --it was a tad more subtle than that article about H-D merging with Honda where they interviewed some suit at the Motor
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 2, 2002
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                      Thx Mac I didn't notice that at first --it was a tad more subtle than
                      that article about H-D merging with Honda where they interviewed some
                      suit at the Motor Co. by the name of Oxenrider. Going down to put in
                      my order for one of those new Honda-Davidson Sabre 883's. See ya.

                      --- In triumphmotorcycleclub2@y..., ammomac_99 <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                      > If you look closely, it motorcycle safely, not safety.
                      >
                      > Just like the MSF portion on perception. You see what you expect
                      to
                      > see. ;-)
                      >
                      > Mac
                      >
                      >
                      > > and politically correct life) however the MSF is a pro-motorcycle
                      > > group that promotes safety through voluntary *training* which
                      most
                      > of
                      > > us agree is a darn good idea. Don't know who would try to
                      > insinuate
                      > > that they share views with treacherous totalitarian enemies of
                      > every
                      > > individual freedom (except that of the lazy to replicate their
                      > genes
                      > > and receive entitlements for it) that is exemplified by Barbara
                      > Boxer.
                    • Alec Gore
                      ... Peter, Easy. I don t use the board. I receive by e-mail and hit Reply . Even I want to start a new topic, I just hit Reply on some old message, change
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 2, 2002
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                        > P.S. How do you get so many messages onto this board? It's taken me
                        > over an hour to get this one message to post.

                        Peter,

                        Easy. I don't use the board. I receive by e-mail and hit "Reply". Even I
                        want to start a new topic, I just hit "Reply" on some old message,
                        change the Subject and delte the old content. Sticking to Plain Text
                        deletes most of the adverts too.

                        Regards

                        Alec
                      • jcatbert45
                        I wouldn t have believed it until I ad my pals at work assist me in my comical efforts at hauling my T-bird up on it s centerstand. I ve finally managed to do
                        Message 11 of 14 , Apr 2, 2002
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                          I wouldn't have believed it until I ad my pals at work assist me in
                          my comical efforts at hauling my T-bird up on it's centerstand. I've
                          finally managed to do it tonight at home by myself <chest thumping>.

                          Alec, I do it pretty much the way you described it and MB; thanks for
                          all your help and pointers! It takes a combination of strenght and
                          technique; more on the latter. The bike has to have the four points
                          of contact an "yes" it is a bit unnerving, especially with a top-
                          heavy bike. I can only get enough leverage by putting all my weight
                          on the leg the pushes on the center-stand and I even need the assist
                          with my left hand, so that does mean letting go of the bike. all
                          this together and walla, up she goes!

                          New Score: Tbird-15 .... Jerry-3.

                          Also thanks to all who have mentioned vapor-lock problems. Happened
                          to me last night. Of course I was doing about 65 mph and quickly ran
                          out of power. It was not at a good time, but I was able to stop
                          safely. My tank was low (aobut 1 gallon left), so I guess that gives
                          more room for vaccuum to form. It took a few times to crank after I
                          released the pressure, but that's because I installed an inline
                          filter and that needs to fill with gas too. Thanks for the
                          invaluable info.

                          It ain't easy being green :)
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