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Albatross Treaty

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  • Bob Conrich
    Listees will recall this from the BBC on 13 March: ..................... The UK government has been criticised by conservationists for not ratifying a global
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 3, 2004
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      Listees will recall this from the BBC on 13 March:

      .....................


      The UK government has been criticised by conservationists for not ratifying a global treaty against long fishing lines, which
      came into force in February.

      The Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) was ratified by Australia, Spain, Ecuador, New Zealand
      and South Africa.

      British participation is important as its overseas territories of the Falklands, South Georgia and Tristan da Cunha are
      breeding grounds for the bird.

      Dr Avery said: "We need help to force governments to combat the appalling actions of these pirates.

      "It is astonishing that many, including the UK government, have not done so."


      ............................


      About an hour ago, the following story was posted by Ananova.
      Tristan da Cunha is not an Overseas Territory, but part of
      one called St. Helena and Dependencies.

      Bob Conrich
      Anguilla, BWI

      .......................................


      UK moves to help save albatross

      The UK is backing action to save endangered albatrosses by ratifying a major global seabird treaty.

      The Government and three of its Overseas Territories have decided to endorse the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses
      and Petrels, a move which means the UK will take measures to help reduce the 300,000 seabird deaths caused by longline
      fishing around the world every year.

      Other crucial issues to be looked at through the agreement include destruction of important breeding and feeding areas,
      pollution and disease in seabird colonies.

      The RSPB, the UK partner of Birdlife International, will lobby ministers to extend ratification to include the last key
      Overseas Territory, Tristan da Cunha.

      Conservationists are also urging people to sign a petition, to be presented to the United Nations in June, calling for action
      against pirate longline fishing. The petitioners are hoping for more than 100,000 signatories.

      Euan Dunn, head of marine policy at the RSPB said "After a long delay, UK ratification is welcome and timely news and a
      hugely significant breakthrough in our battle to prevent albatross extinctions.

      "All 21 albatross species face extinction but this threat can still be reversed if more countries ratify this treaty and take
      decisive action. This move by the British government should be a powerful catalyst for that to happen."

      Longline fishing poses the greatest single threat to albatrosses with more than 300,000 seabirds including 100,000
      albatrosses dying on baited hooks around the world each year.

      Petrels are the other main casualties with six globally threatened species endangered by longlining practices.

      The black-browed, wandering and grey headed albatrosses on UK Overseas Territories all now have a better chance of survival.
      But the Amsterdam albatross found only on the French Southern Territory of Amsterdam Island, will remain the most endangered
      albatross of all. Just 80 birds remain and, typically, only about 20 pairs of this species breed each year.

      Copyright © 2004 Ananova Ltd
    • Ian Turner
      Great news, Bob! Ian
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 4, 2004
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        Great news, Bob!

        Ian

        In message <406F6565.3040201@...> Bob Conrich <bob@...> writes:
        > <html><body>
        >
        >
        > <tt>
        > Listees will recall this from the BBC on 13 March:<BR>
        > <BR>
        > .....................<BR>
        > <BR>
        > <BR>
        > The UK government has been criticised by conservationists for not ratifying a global treaty against long fishing lines, which<BR>
        > came into force in February.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > The Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) was ratified by Australia, Spain, Ecuador, New Zealand<BR>
        > and South Africa.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > British participation is important as its overseas territories of the Falklands, South Georgia and Tristan da Cunha are<BR>
        > breeding grounds for the bird.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Dr Avery said: "We need help to force governments to combat the appalling actions of these pirates.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > "It is astonishing that many, including the UK government, have not done so."<BR>
        > <BR>
        > <BR>
        > ............................<BR>
        > <BR>
        > <BR>
        > About an hour ago, the following story was posted by Ananova.<BR>
        > Tristan da Cunha is not an Overseas Territory, but part of<BR>
        > one called St. Helena and Dependencies.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Bob Conrich<BR>
        > Anguilla, BWI<BR>
        > <BR>
        > .......................................<BR>
        > <BR>
        > <BR>
        > UK moves to help save albatross<BR>
        > <BR>
        > The UK is backing action to save endangered albatrosses by ratifying a major global seabird treaty.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > The Government and three of its Overseas Territories have decided to endorse the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses <BR>
        > and Petrels, a move which means the UK will take measures to help reduce the 300,000 seabird deaths caused by longline <BR>
        > fishing around the world every year.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Other crucial issues to be looked at through the agreement include destruction of important breeding and feeding areas, <BR>
        > pollution and disease in seabird colonies.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > The RSPB, the UK partner of Birdlife International, will lobby ministers to extend ratification to include the last key <BR>
        > Overseas Territory, Tristan da Cunha.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Conservationists are also urging people to sign a petition, to be presented to the United Nations in June, calling for action <BR>
        > against pirate longline fishing. The petitioners are hoping for more than 100,000 signatories.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Euan Dunn, head of marine policy at the RSPB said "After a long delay, UK ratification is welcome and timely news and a <BR>
        > hugely significant breakthrough in our battle to prevent albatross extinctions.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > "All 21 albatross species face extinction but this threat can still be reversed if more countries ratify this treaty and take <BR>
        > decisive action. This move by the British government should be a powerful catalyst for that to happen."<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Longline fishing poses the greatest single threat to albatrosses with more than 300,000 seabirds including 100,000 <BR>
        > albatrosses dying on baited hooks around the world each year.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Petrels are the other main casualties with six globally threatened species endangered by longlining practices.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > The black-browed, wandering and grey headed albatrosses on UK Overseas Territories all now have a better chance of survival. <BR>
        > But the Amsterdam albatross found only on the French Southern Territory of Amsterdam Island, will remain the most endangered <BR>
        > albatross of all. Just 80 birds remain and, typically, only about 20 pairs of this species breed each year.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Copyright � 2004 Ananova Ltd<BR>
        > <BR>
        > </tt>
        >
        > <br><br>
        > <tt>
        > This is the Tristan da Cunha list.<BR>
        > To post to the list send messages to tristan-da-cunha@egroups.com<BR>
        > To change your settings, receive a digest or un-subscribe, go to<BR>
        > <a href="http://www.egroups.com/group/tristan-da-cunha/">http://www.egroups.com/group/tristan-da-cunha/</a><BR>
        > <BR>
        > For information about Tristan da Cunha, please see the official Tristan web page at <a href="http://website.lineone.net/~sthelena/tristaninfo.htm">http://website.lineone.net/~sthelena/tristaninfo.htm</a><BR>
        > </tt>
        > <br><br>
        >
        > <br>
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      • Bob Conrich
        NewScientist.com Article Preview Westminster diary * 02 April 2005 issue * Tam Dalyell * Magazine issue 2493 Fishing is killing the sailor s friend, while
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 30, 2005
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          NewScientist.com

          Article Preview
          Westminster diary

          * 02 April 2005 issue
          * Tam Dalyell
          * Magazine issue 2493

          Fishing is killing the sailor's friend, while polygraphs allow a different sort of angling, says Tam Dalyell


          HARM the albatross and dreadful things can happen, as Samuel Taylor Coleridge warned. The albatross has long been under
          threat from pirate, long-line fishing. Much has been said of the need to protect the 21 remaining species of the bird, but
          environment minister Elliot Morley admits that there are no immediate solutions to the problem.

          However, he says a milestone was reached when the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) was
          ratified in March 2004. It involves the Falkland Islands, South Georgia, the South Sandwich Islands and the British
          Antarctic Territories. Morley also now leads an international ministerial task force of the Organisation for Economic
          Cooperation and Development to investigate threats from pirate fishing.

          But Euan Dunn, head of marine policy at the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), says ratification of ACAP has
          not yet been extended to Tristan da Cunha, the only known ...

          .....................


          The complete article is 533 words long.
          To continue reading this article, subscribe to New Scientist. Get 4 issues of New Scientist magazine and instant access to
          all online content for only $4.95


          .....................


          Sorry, this is all I get as a non-subscriber.

          Bob Conrich
        • larry berk
          General info found here, along with good photos on links: http://www.acap.aq/ Elarbe ... __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Make Yahoo! your
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 30, 2005
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            General info found here, along with good photos on
            links:

            http://www.acap.aq/

            Elarbe

            --- Bob Conrich <bob@...> wrote:
            >
            > NewScientist.com
            >
            > Article Preview
            > Westminster diary
            >
            > * 02 April 2005 issue
            > * Tam Dalyell
            > * Magazine issue 2493
            >
            > Fishing is killing the sailor's friend, while
            > polygraphs allow a different sort of angling, says
            > Tam Dalyell
            >
            >
            > HARM the albatross and dreadful things can happen,
            > as Samuel Taylor Coleridge warned. The albatross has
            > long been under
            > threat from pirate, long-line fishing. Much has been
            > said of the need to protect the 21 remaining species
            > of the bird, but
            > environment minister Elliot Morley admits that there
            > are no immediate solutions to the problem.
            >
            > However, he says a milestone was reached when the
            > Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and
            > Petrels (ACAP) was
            > ratified in March 2004. It involves the Falkland
            > Islands, South Georgia, the South Sandwich Islands
            > and the British
            > Antarctic Territories. Morley also now leads an
            > international ministerial task force of the
            > Organisation for Economic
            > Cooperation and Development to investigate threats
            > from pirate fishing.
            >
            > But Euan Dunn, head of marine policy at the Royal
            > Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), says
            > ratification of ACAP has
            > not yet been extended to Tristan da Cunha, the only
            > known ...
            >
            > .....................
            >
            >
            > The complete article is 533 words long.
            > To continue reading this article, subscribe to New
            > Scientist. Get 4 issues of New Scientist magazine
            > and instant access to
            > all online content for only $4.95
            >
            >
            > .....................
            >
            >
            > Sorry, this is all I get as a non-subscriber.
            >
            > Bob Conrich
            >
            >



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