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Endangered rockhopper penguins

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  • bobconrich
    Examiner.com Environmentalists threaten lawsuit to force U.S. government to list penguins as endangered species October 22, 7:55 PM Denver Science News
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 31, 2009
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      Examiner.com

      Environmentalists threaten lawsuit to force U.S. government to list penguins as endangered species
      October 22, 7:55 PM
      Denver Science News Examiner
      Hank Lacey


      Two environmental groups have notified the Obama administration that they intend to sue the U.S. government to force a listing of two penguin species as endangered.

      The species involved are the emperor penguin and the northern and southern rockhopper penguin.

      “Right now penguins are marching toward extinction due to the impacts of global warming,” Shaye Wolf, a seabird biologist with the Center for Biological Diversity, said. “Protecting penguins under the Endangered Species Act is an essential step toward saving them.”

      The U.S. Department of Interior decided in late 2008 that the impacts of global climate change on emperor penguins are too "uncertain" to warrant listing the species as endangered. The Bush administration also rejected petitions to list the rockhopper penguin species.

      One recent study concluded that about 40 percent of the world's population of emperior penguins can be expected to disappear if average world temperatures rise by 1.3 degrees Celsius.

      According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, greenhouse gas emissions are expected to produce a change in worldwide average temperatures of 0.2 degree Celsius per decade if they are not significantly reduced.

      Emperor penguins are the most ice-dependent of all penguin species. They rely on sea ice in and near Antarctica for habitat. The warming ocean in the far southern reaches of the planet has begun to melt Antarctic ice sheets and reduce the amount of food available to the species.

      Northern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome moseleyi) are found in the islands of Tristan de Cunha and Gough Island and on the Amsterdam and St. Paul Islands.

      The Islands of Tristan de Cunha are among the most remote in the world. They lie about 1,750 miles to the west of South Africa in the south Atlantic Ocean. Gough Island is a remote volcanic island located about 250 miles southeast of the Islands of Tristan de Cunha.

      The Amsterdam and St. Paul Islands are located in the southern Indian Ocean.

      Southern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome) live in sub-antarctic waters and on the southern coast of South America.

      The Center for Biological Diversity and Turtle Island Restoration Network made clear their intention to sue the U.S. government in order to force an Endangered Species Act listing in a letter sent Oct. 6 to the U.S. Department of Interior.

      Listing of the penguin species under the Endangered Species Act would provide broad protection to their populations, including a requirement that federal agencies avoid any action that would "jeopardize the continued existence" of the species. The law may also force federal agencies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions caused by their activities.

      Six species of penguin, including the African, yellow-eyed, white-flippered, Fiordland crested, Humboldt, and erect-crested penguins, as well as one population of the southern rockhopper penguin, were proposed for listing as endangered species in December 2008


      Copyright © 2009 Clarity Digital Group LLC d/b/a Examiner.com. All Rights reserved.
    • david
      I m all for doing everything to save & protect Penguins. But suing the US Government will very likely do very little good, if any. IT will keep some Lawyers
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 31, 2009
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        I'm all for doing everything to save & protect Penguins. But suing the US Government will very likely do very little good, if any. IT will keep some Lawyers employed; money that could probably be better spent in some other manner to protect and conserve the penguin's habitat. What do the biologists say?
        Dave Flaat

        --- In tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com, "bobconrich" <bob@...> wrote:
        >
        > Examiner.com
        >
        > Environmentalists threaten lawsuit to force U.S. government to list penguins as endangered species
        > October 22, 7:55 PM
        > Denver Science News Examiner
        > Hank Lacey
        >
        >
        > Two environmental groups have notified the Obama administration that they intend to sue the U.S. government to force a listing of two penguin species as endangered.
        >
        > The species involved are the emperor penguin and the northern and southern rockhopper penguin.
        >
        > “Right now penguins are marching toward extinction due to the impacts of global warming,” Shaye Wolf, a seabird biologist with the Center for Biological Diversity, said. “Protecting penguins under the Endangered Species Act is an essential step toward saving them.”
        >
        > The U.S. Department of Interior decided in late 2008 that the impacts of global climate change on emperor penguins are too "uncertain" to warrant listing the species as endangered. The Bush administration also rejected petitions to list the rockhopper penguin species.
        >
        > One recent study concluded that about 40 percent of the world's population of emperior penguins can be expected to disappear if average world temperatures rise by 1.3 degrees Celsius.
        >
        > According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, greenhouse gas emissions are expected to produce a change in worldwide average temperatures of 0.2 degree Celsius per decade if they are not significantly reduced.
        >
        > Emperor penguins are the most ice-dependent of all penguin species. They rely on sea ice in and near Antarctica for habitat. The warming ocean in the far southern reaches of the planet has begun to melt Antarctic ice sheets and reduce the amount of food available to the species.
        >
        > Northern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome moseleyi) are found in the islands of Tristan de Cunha and Gough Island and on the Amsterdam and St. Paul Islands.
        >
        > The Islands of Tristan de Cunha are among the most remote in the world. They lie about 1,750 miles to the west of South Africa in the south Atlantic Ocean. Gough Island is a remote volcanic island located about 250 miles southeast of the Islands of Tristan de Cunha.
        >
        > The Amsterdam and St. Paul Islands are located in the southern Indian Ocean.
        >
        > Southern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome) live in sub-antarctic waters and on the southern coast of South America.
        >
        > The Center for Biological Diversity and Turtle Island Restoration Network made clear their intention to sue the U.S. government in order to force an Endangered Species Act listing in a letter sent Oct. 6 to the U.S. Department of Interior.
        >
        > Listing of the penguin species under the Endangered Species Act would provide broad protection to their populations, including a requirement that federal agencies avoid any action that would "jeopardize the continued existence" of the species. The law may also force federal agencies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions caused by their activities.
        >
        > Six species of penguin, including the African, yellow-eyed, white-flippered, Fiordland crested, Humboldt, and erect-crested penguins, as well as one population of the southern rockhopper penguin, were proposed for listing as endangered species in December 2008
        >
        >
        > Copyright © 2009 Clarity Digital Group LLC d/b/a Examiner.com. All Rights reserved.
        >
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