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RE: [TdC] Globetrotting priest tells tales of his travels

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  • Simon Pipe
    I don t think Father Sullivan was complaining about island life, as such... merely commenting on a fact. I loved being on St Helena, but Christmas Day was
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 22, 2009
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      I don't think Father Sullivan was complaining about island life, as such... merely commenting on a fact. I loved being on St Helena, but Christmas Day was lonely. I work alone from home now and it's a lonely existence... which I rather like. I enjoy my job but at the end of the shift, like Father Brendan, I find it a relief to get off! 
       
      simon
       
       
       
       


      From: tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bob Conrich
      Sent: 22 April 2009 16:34
      To: tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [TdC] Globetrotting priest tells tales of his travels

      http://is.gd/ tTuR

      Apr 22 2009
      by Amy Salter,
      Formby Times, UK

      Globetrotting priest tells tales of his travels in his first book

      A PRIEST who has travelled the world as a missionary worker has released a book about his experiences.

      Father Brendan Sullivan has spent his life globetrotting across continents, working in places as big as Wisconsin and as small as the Falkland Islands.

      Now retired at Herbert House missionary on Victoria Road, the 85-year-old has gathered his memories for his first book, Down Memory Lane: Recollections of a Wandering Missionary.

      Father Sullivan grew up in Bradford as one of seven children to Benedictine Monk parents.

      From the age of 18 he knew he wanted to become a missionary worker and was ordained as a priest in London in 1947. Over the years he worked in Scotland, India and America. He came to Freshfields in 1982 where he worked as St Peter’s House for six years. Father Sullivan then rotated between St Helena, off the coast of Africa, Tristan da Cunha and the Falkland Islands.

      He said: “While working abroad I did parish work, teaching people, doing sacraments and saying mass for them. I enjoyed it on St Helena because it was punctuated with travel and I used to spend about three months on each island. It was also a very lonely existence. The only way to get to St Helena was by boat and it would only come every three months so you’d get there and that would be that. You wouldn’t be able to leave, or get post or anything for three months, so it would always be a great relief to get off the island again. When I got to one of the islands the accommodation was an old jail, so it’s funny to say I spent a month in jail!

      “The people on Tristan da Cunha hadn’t had a priest on the island for many years, so I felt very fulfilled in my work there.”

      Father Sullivan is signing copies of his book at Pritchards on Brows Lane on Saturday, April 25 from 10.30am to 11.30am.

      ------------ -----

      It is unclear to me why people volunteer to go to remote islands, claiming to serve God and man, and then complain bitterly about how lonely they were and what a relief it was when their ordeal was finally over.

      Bob

    • Claire Volkwyn
      I agree with Simon – until you’ve actually experienced time on a remote island for yourself, you can’t really know what the sense of isolation really
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 22, 2009
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        I agree with Simon – until you’ve actually experienced time on a remote island for yourself, you can’t really know what the sense of isolation really feels like or how it will affect you.  Tristan is one of my favourite places in the world, but it can be lonely and you can feel isolated – it’s not a bad thing, it’s just the way it is.  It would be like living anywhere away from your friends and family and all that is familiar – be it on an island in the South Atlantic, or New York…

         

        Claire

         

        PS:  Check out the new Tristan Government website at www.tristan-da-cunha.com

         

         

        From: tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Simon Pipe
        Sent: 22 April 2009 07:05 PM
        To: tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [TdC] Globetrotting priest tells tales of his travels

         




        

        I don't think Father Sullivan was complaining about island life, as such... merely commenting on a fact. I loved being on St Helena, but Christmas Day was lonely. I work alone from home now and it's a lonely existence... which I rather like. I enjoy my job but at the end of the shift, like Father Brendan, I find it a relief to get off! 

         

        simon

         

         

         

         

         


        From: tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bob Conrich
        Sent: 22 April 2009 16:34
        To: tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [TdC] Globetrotting priest tells tales of his travels

        http://is.gd/tTuR

        Apr 22 2009
        by Amy Salter,
        Formby Times, UK

        Globetrotting priest tells tales of his travels in his first book

        A PRIEST who has travelled the world as a missionary worker has released a book about his experiences.

        Father Brendan Sullivan has spent his life globetrotting across continents, working in places as big as Wisconsin and as small as the Falkland Islands.

        Now retired at Herbert House missionary on Victoria Road, the 85-year-old has gathered his memories for his first book, Down Memory Lane: Recollections of a Wandering Missionary.

        Father Sullivan grew up in Bradford as one of seven children to Benedictine Monk parents.

        From the age of 18 he knew he wanted to become a missionary worker and was ordained as a priest in London in 1947. Over the years he worked in Scotland, India and America. He came to Freshfields in 1982 where he worked as St Peter’s House for six years. Father Sullivan then rotated between St Helena, off the coast of Africa, Tristan da Cunha and the Falkland Islands.

        He said: “While working abroad I did parish work, teaching people, doing sacraments and saying mass for them. I enjoyed it on St Helena because it was punctuated with travel and I used to spend about three months on each island. It was also a very lonely existence. The only way to get to St Helena was by boat and it would only come every three months so you’d get there and that would be that. You wouldn’t be able to leave, or get post or anything for three months, so it would always be a great relief to get off the island again. When I got to one of the islands the accommodation was an old jail, so it’s funny to say I spent a month in jail!

        “The people on Tristan da Cunha hadn’t had a priest on the island for many years, so I felt very fulfilled in my work there.”

        Father Sullivan is signing copies of his book at Pritchards on Brows Lane on Saturday, April 25 from 10.30am to 11.30am.

        -----------------

        It is unclear to me why people volunteer to go to remote islands, claiming to serve God and man, and then complain bitterly about how lonely they were and what a relief it was when their ordeal was finally over.

        Bob

      • Ilan Kelman
        A new paper by Vicky Hards from the British Geological Survey has just been published on the 2004 eruption of the Tristan volcano in Shima: The International
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 22, 2009
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          A new paper by Vicky Hards from the British Geological Survey has just been published on the 2004 eruption of the Tristan volcano in "Shima: The International Journal of Research into Island Cultures" (vol. 3, no. 1, April 2009, pp. 16-32). Accessing the paper is free at http://www.shimajournal.org/current.html (paper v) although the file is large at 8.4 MB.

          Ilan
        • Bob Conrich
          Geologists and seismologists interested in photomicrographs of pumice with blue dye impregnation illustrating the extremely high vessicularity and cuspate
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 22, 2009
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            Geologists and seismologists interested in photomicrographs of pumice with blue dye impregnation illustrating the extremely high vessicularity and cuspate shapes of the vesicles will love this paper.

            For the rest of us, there are some great photos of the extraordinarily beautiful place the Islanders call home. Yes, it really is that green!


            Bob
          • Jack Honeycutt
            Simon wrote.... I don t think Father Sullivan was complaining about island life, as such... merely commenting on a fact. I loved being on St Helena, but
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 15, 2009
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              Simon wrote....

              I don't think Father Sullivan was complaining about island life, as such... merely commenting on a fact. I loved being on St Helena, but Christmas Day was lonely. I work alone from home now and it's a lonely existence... which I rather like. I enjoy my job but at the end of the shift, like Father Brendan, I find it a relief to get off! 

               ********************************
              I think a isolated island life would not bother me at all.   I would want a sweetheart/girlfriend/wife with me.  And my books.  Yes, my library.  That is about all I would need I believe....

              jack

              Portland Oregon, USA 

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