Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [TdC] MicroHydro

Expand Messages
  • Paul & Mel Young
    Actually Bob the islanders do have to pay for electricity My Mother-In-Law pays approx £16 - £20 per month for her electricity Nearly the same as the UK was
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 29, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Actually Bob the islanders do have to pay for electricity

      My Mother-In-Law pays approx £16 - £20 per month for her electricity

      Nearly the same as the UK was about 3 years ago (Well at least us anyway)

      I gave them a petrol Generator when we went in 2002 but petrol is rare now
      They arn't importing very much petrol so all future vehicles will have to be
      diesel

      I was on the Lyme bay on Sunday, they are all looking forward to Tristan
      none of them have ever been there before !! should be interesting!!!

      Anyway

      Cheers

      Paul & Mel


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Bob Conrich" <bob@...>
      To: <tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2008 1:26 PM
      Subject: [TdC] MicroHydro


      > Hi Alan,
      >
      > It's a bit more complicated than some realise. As part of the deal
      > with Ovenstone, the factory supplies electricity for the entire
      > community, at no cost to the islanders, as I understand it. So the
      > cost of electrical generation is not a popular issue, as it is in many
      > places.
      >
      > The factory manager's name is Erik and he and his wife have this blog:
      > http://erikclaire.wordpress.com/
      > I suggest that he would be a good person to start discussions with.
      >
      > Bob
      >
      >
      >
      > This is the Tristan da Cunha list.
      > To post to the list send messages to tristan-da-cunha@egroups.com
      > To change your settings, receive a digest or un-subscribe, go to
      > http://www.egroups.com/group/tristan-da-cunha/
      >
      > For information about Tristan da Cunha, please see the official Tristan
      > web page at http://website.lineone.net/~sthelena/tristaninfo.htm
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Bob Conrich
      Paul, thank you. I was misinformed. Given the wage scale there, it seems hydro could be of real benefit to the people. This is what I was told about the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 29, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Paul, thank you. I was misinformed. Given the wage scale there, it
        seems hydro could be of real benefit to the people.

        This is what I was told about the water supply:

        "The trouble with the water that comes down from Base is 1) that is is
        not regular - there is only a small stream in the village that is
        permanent; and 2) all other water comes down in inaccessible places, and
        the costs of making use of it would be horrendous. This is money the
        British government I am sure would not want to pony up, and I'm not sure
        the islanders would want it."

        Aside from a small group of alternative energy hobbyists, most people
        don't care all that much where their electricity comes from or how
        it's generated. They care more about cost and reliability. The
        islanders may be no different from the rest of us in this regard.
      • alan_drake@juno.com
        Microhydro, and later wind, might supply only a (hopefully large) fraction of the power with diesel making up the balance. Unless, of course a large pond (at
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 29, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Microhydro, and later wind, might supply only a (hopefully large) fraction of the power with diesel making up the balance.

          Unless, of course a large pond (at lest one exists at some elevation) could be tapped on demand and the resource readily available exceeds the communities needs. Then the diesel set could be reserved for emergency use.

          It is significantly less difficult to transport electricity from a somewhat remote part of the island (the closer the better of course) than it is potable water.

          And since diesel will remain in place, a hydropower source that provides 100% of the electricity after a modest rain and 12% after a prolonged dry spell could be of significant economic value to the islanders. (One would not want a source of potable water that only met 12% of ones needs at times). Add some wind power (with both hydro and diesel to stabilize the grid) and the diesel bill could be well reduced.

          And such schemes are certainly worthy of EU or UK grants from different sources.

          IMHO, the upcoming visit by a group of competent civil engineers is an opportunity to define what options are available, at least roughly. The first step.

          I have written on the linked blog. What otehr steps (write the Chief Islander ? His eMail address ?)

          Best Hopes,

          Alan

          -- "Bob Conrich" <bob@...> wrote:
          Paul, thank you. I was misinformed. Given the wage scale there, it
          seems hydro could be of real benefit to the people.

          This is what I was told about the water supply:

          "The trouble with the water that comes down from Base is 1) that is is
          not regular - there is only a small stream in the village that is
          permanent; and 2) all other water comes down in inaccessible places, and
          the costs of making use of it would be horrendous. This is money the
          British government I am sure would not want to pony up, and I'm not sure
          the islanders would want it."

          Aside from a small group of alternative energy hobbyists, most people
          don't care all that much where their electricity comes from or how
          it's generated. They care more about cost and reliability. The
          islanders may be no different from the rest of us in this regard.



          This is the Tristan da Cunha list.
          To post to the list send messages to tristan-da-cunha@egroups.com
          To change your settings, receive a digest or un-subscribe, go to
          http://www.egroups.com/group/tristan-da-cunha/

          For information about Tristan da Cunha, please see the official Tristan web page at http://website.lineone.net/~sthelena/tristaninfo.htm

          Yahoo! Groups Links




          _____________________________________________________________
          Click for free information on accounting careers, $150/hour potential.
          http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2121/fc/Ioyw6i3l7D4HOa5FRIU5LHCH7jrOMvsCDaR4FK2W46Vd4vnKwqbBjw/
        • gigh@rogers.com
          Gentlemen, Having just come upon your discussion pertaining to alternative energy sources, I was compelled to write. Given the unique location of Tristan Da
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 29, 2008
          • 0 Attachment

            Gentlemen,

            Having just come upon your discussion pertaining to alternative energy sources, I was compelled to write.

            Given the unique location of Tristan Da Cunha , would it not be more prudent to consider using wave power as a viable energy source. A series of buoys tethered to the ocean floor within close proximity to the shoreline could convert the cyclical wave motion into admissible electrical energy. Unlike wind, solar and fossil fuels, electricity produced in such a manner would be available 24/7.

            There might also be an added bonus and further reason for considering such a proposition. Placed strategically, nearby the enterance of Calshot Harbour it may even provide a means of offering some protection or wave moderation. Granted, I am really stretching at this point.

            Gig Hofstetter

            Mississauga, Canada


            --- In tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Conrich" <bob@...> wrote:
            >
            > Paul, thank you. I was misinformed. Given the wage scale there, it
            > seems hydro could be of real benefit to the people.
            >
            > This is what I was told about the water supply:
            >
            > "The trouble with the water that comes down from Base is 1) that is is
            > not regular - there is only a small stream in the village that is
            > permanent; and 2) all other water comes down in inaccessible places, and
            > the costs of making use of it would be horrendous. This is money the
            > British government I am sure would not want to pony up, and I'm not sure
            > the islanders would want it."
            >
            > Aside from a small group of alternative energy hobbyists, most people
            > don't care all that much where their electricity comes from or how
            > it's generated. They care more about cost and reliability. The
            > islanders may be no different from the rest of us in this regard.
            >

          • Bob Conrich
            Gig, Has this been done anywhere successfully? In the open ocean for more than a few months?
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 29, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Gig,

              Has this been done anywhere successfully? In the open ocean for more
              than a few months?


              --- In tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com, "gigh@..." <gigh@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Gentlemen,
              >
              > Having just come upon your discussion pertaining to alternative energy
              > sources, I was compelled to write.
              >
              > Given the unique location of Tristan Da Cunha, would it not be more
              > prudent to consider using wave power as a viable energy source. A series
              > of buoys tethered to the ocean floor within close proximity to the
              > shoreline could convert the cyclical wave motion into admissible
              > electrical energy. Unlike wind, solar and fossil fuels, electricity
              > produced in such a manner would be available 24/7.
              >
              > There might also be an added bonus and further reason for considering
              > such a proposition. Placed strategically, nearby the enterance of
              > Calshot Harbour it may even provide a means of offering some protection
              > or wave moderation. Granted, I am really stretching at this point.
              >
              > Gig Hofstetter
              >
              > Mississauga, Canada
            • Gig Hofstetter
              Hi Bob, After, sending you that email, I started thinking about exactly the same thought. I ended up finding some information at the Oregon State University
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 29, 2008
              • 0 Attachment

                Hi Bob,

                 

                After, sending you that email, I started thinking about exactly the same thought.

                 

                I ended up finding some information at the Oregon State University that depicts exactly what I had in mind. They call it a “Linear Generator Buoy”; I have attached a picture, which gives you a great visual. Tests have shown that a single buoy measuring three metres high, bobbing up and down in the ocean, could produce 250 kilowatts. In their example, they figured 250 buoys comprising an electrical grid, could light the City of Portland, Oregon (located in the USA , North West ). Granted the population at 537,000 does not begin to compare with that of Tristan da Cunha, but it does make you wonder what a single float is capable of providing for its’ some 280 inhabitants.

                 

                They were using wave heights that measured anywhere between 1.5 to 3.0 metres

                 

                It would seem that they have done some preliminary testing. Including tests in Hawaii , Portugal and England . I have attached here a web site that discusses the concept and results in more detail, http://ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=35125

                 

                I hope you find this reading worthy of your attention.

                 

                Gig Hofstetter

                 

                 


                From: tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bob Conrich
                Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2008 6:38 PM
                To: tristan-da-cunha@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [TdC] Re: MicroHydro

                 

                Gig,

                Has this been done anywhere successfully? In the open ocean for more
                than a few months?

                --- In tristan-da-cunha@ yahoogroups. com, "gigh@..." <gigh@...> wrote:

                >
                >
                > Gentlemen,
                >
                > Having just come upon your discussion pertaining to alternative energy
                > sources, I was compelled to write.
                >
                > Given the unique location of Tristan Da Cunha ,
                would it not be more
                > prudent to consider using wave power as a viable energy source. A series
                > of buoys tethered to the ocean floor within close proximity to the
                > shoreline could convert the cyclical wave motion into admissible
                > electrical energy. Unlike wind, solar and fossil fuels, electricity
                > produced in such a manner would be available 24/7.
                >
                > There might also be an added bonus and further reason for considering
                > such a proposition. Placed strategically, nearby the enterance of
                > Calshot
                w:st="on">Harbour it may even provide a means of offering some protection
                > or wave moderation. Granted, I am really stretching at this point.
                >
                > Gig Hofstetter
                >
                > Mississauga ,
                w:st="on">Canada

              • Bob Conrich
                Gig, thanks for the further information. I suppose one of these tethered buoy-generators could be made as big as an ocean liner. If it worked, Tristan would
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 30, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Gig, thanks for the further information. I suppose one of these
                  tethered buoy-generators could be made as big as an ocean liner. If
                  it worked, Tristan would have so much excess energy they could import
                  bauxite and make aluminium for export, like they do in Dubai, where
                  they have very cheap energy. If the Tristanians had a decent harbour.

                  Keeping this floating monster tethered, however, poses some
                  engineering challenges and it seems better to try to work these out in
                  Oregon instead of a place that's so difficult and expensive to get to.

                  I am in awe of developmental engineers who are working on tomorrow's
                  technology, but I'm more of a public works type guy, interested in
                  proven technology that can be maintained in the field by people who
                  don't have to be rocket scientists.

                  I like to quote St. Lucia educator, Dr. Didacus Jules:

                  Keep it simple
                  Keep it affordable
                  Keep it focused
                  Keep it attainable

                  Bob
                • Marc SERRAU
                  Bonjour, What kind of river or torrent exist on Tristan ? Is there any lake not too close from the sea level ? If not, hydraulic structure will require a dam
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 31, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Bonjour,

                    What kind of river or torrent exist on Tristan ?
                    Is there any lake not too close from the sea level ?
                    If not, hydraulic structure will require a dam with reservoir in order
                    to feed the turbine with a constant flow. The size (and altitude) of the
                    reservoir can be determined from the power needs and rain level at
                    Tristan. Based on what I read on the island, I can say that the rain
                    level is high, so hydraulic powerplant could replace a lot of costly
                    diesel. Based on sustainable energy litterature, I can say that multi
                    sources energy is the best solution. Wind and water can provide a lot of
                    power on a regular basis on such an island. Do not erase solar power
                    solutions too fast. It could be (if not yet) even interesting for
                    domestic water warming.

                    Regards,

                    Marc SERRAU


                    Bob Conrich a écrit :
                    > Paul, thank you. I was misinformed. Given the wage scale there, it
                    > seems hydro could be of real benefit to the people.
                    >
                    > This is what I was told about the water supply:
                    >
                    > "The trouble with the water that comes down from Base is 1) that is is
                    > not regular - there is only a small stream in the village that is
                    > permanent; and 2) all other water comes down in inaccessible places, and
                    > the costs of making use of it would be horrendous. This is money the
                    > British government I am sure would not want to pony up, and I'm not sure
                    > the islanders would want it."
                    >
                    > Aside from a small group of alternative energy hobbyists, most people
                    > don't care all that much where their electricity comes from or how
                    > it's generated. They care more about cost and reliability. The
                    > islanders may be no different from the rest of us in this regard.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.