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Tristan birds dying in Florida

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  • Bob Conrich
    June 19, 2007 at 16:32:05 FWC SEARCHES FOR CAUSE OF EAST COAST SEABIRD DIE-OFF by Wendy Quigley http://www.opednews.com The Florida Fish and Wildlife
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 20, 2007
      June 19, 2007 at 16:32:05
      FWC SEARCHES FOR CAUSE OF EAST COAST SEABIRD DIE-OFF
      by Wendy Quigley
      http://www.opednews.com


      The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has received reports of more than 200 dead or sick greater
      shearwaters, a gull-like bird, since Saturday along Florida’s east coast. The birds have been found from Hobe Sound in Martin
      County to South Ponte Vedra Beach in St. Johns County.

      Local wildlife rehabilitators report receiving numerous emaciated and dehydrated birds as well. FWC biologists are examining the
      dead birds to investigate the cause of this die-off.

      Researchers with FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute are calling the die-off of birds significant and have collected some
      of the birds for testing. Initial necropsy results are not definitive; however, preliminary findings indicate starvation during
      the migration process played a role. Additional test results are pending.

      “As only one species appears to be affected and the sick and dead birds have similar symptoms, we believe the seabirds are
      suffering from the same ailment,” said Dan Wolf, research biologist. “In 2005, a similar, but less severe shearwater die-off
      occurred.”

      According to the Peterson Field Guide for Eastern Birds, shearwaters spend their lives at sea, well offshore in the open ocean
      except for when they breed, nest and rear young. Greater shearwaters breed primarily on Tristan da Cunha Island in the South
      Atlantic and wander the sea north to Greenland and Iceland, and back. Storms at sea can weaken the birds and cause them to
      become sick, dehydrated and die.

      The public can assist the investigation by reporting sick, injured or dead birds online at MyFWC.com/bird. The public is asked
      not to handle birds and to contact a local wildlife rehabilitative facility for assistance with sick or injured birds. The
      online wild bird mortality database is a cooperative program between FWC and the Florida Department of Health to monitor bird
      health.


      Contact: Wendy Quigley, (727) 896-8626
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