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  • amarugia_girl
    So how easy are the eggs to see? I assume that they are TINY? Also, we DO have a couple of ponds. Would the water work well for starting the babies in? You
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 1, 2002
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      So how easy are the eggs to see? I assume that they are TINY?
      Also, we DO have a couple of ponds. Would the water work well for
      starting the babies in? You were saying that with the coconut shell
      you make a sort of paste, that you allow to dry out. Would the pond
      silt be good for this?
      Denise
    • amarugia_girl
      So how easy are the eggs to see? I assume that they are TINY? Also, we DO have a couple of ponds. Would the water work well for starting the babies in? You
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 1, 2002
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        So how easy are the eggs to see? I assume that they are TINY?
        Also, we DO have a couple of ponds. Would the water work well for
        starting the babies in? You were saying that with the coconut shell
        you make a sort of paste, that you allow to dry out. Would the pond
        silt be good for this?
        Denise
      • vipalprem
        Denise, Evolutionary forces have given triops a variety of strategies to maintain their unique niche in this beautiful cosmos. Perhaps their cuteness is
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 1, 2002
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          Denise,

          Evolutionary forces have given triops a variety of strategies to
          maintain their unique niche in this beautiful cosmos. Perhaps their
          cuteness is another strategy that encourages the planet's dominant bi-
          peds to propogate them in new, if not completely "natural," habitats.

          One of the strategies involves the conditions under which eggs will
          hatch.

          Spider/Charles is quite right--it's pretty rare for eggs to hatch in
          an established tank because this would put the babies at the risk of
          being eaten by their older cousins and parents.

          Therefore, the eggs prefer conditions similar to nature--pure water
          with few dissolved minerals in it. That's why the kits recommend
          distilled water for starting T's. As for starting material to mix
          with the coconut shell detritus, pond silt might be good especially
          if it carries micro-organisms that the emerging T's might find
          tasty. Then again, those ponds are probably NOT too similar to their
          natural habitat, so there may be organisms that might impeded the
          T's - but I don't know off hand what these might be. So, if you try
          the silt, and it doesn't work--maybe try not using it for the next
          attempt.

          My most successful run of hatching eggs I harvested from adult T's
          occurred because I had purchased a paramecium culture from a
          scientific supply company, and add the protozoa to the distilled
          water once the first T's had hatched. I ended up with about 15 t's
          as a result of that run. Since then I've also had good luck feeding
          them green water and infusoria. (You can look up previous discussion
          topics here by following the "Messages" link at the left, and then
          using the "Search Archive" button at the upper right.) I think Paul
          Dashner uses liquid fish fry food--he hasn't confirmed that
          assumption yet, however. I think Paul's a good source of info on
          T's -- he's raised a lot of them, and he's the gentleman who turned
          me onto the Jungle Dirt Magnet foam filter that I use to keep my 20
          gallon tank clear.

          The eggs are very small, but not impossible to see. If you've ever
          played with sea monkeys/brine shrimp (artemia salina or artemia
          franciscana) the eggs are similar in appearance, but T's are more
          pinkish than brown. The eggs look pretty cool under a microscope -
          they are pitted so that they will float when first hydrated, keeping
          them out of the dirt and close to the sunlight. After a time, if
          they haven't hatched, they eventually sink, and will have to wait for
          another drying period to hatch.

          In my tanks I can see the eggs along the sides of the tank as a
          distinctly pinkish-colored layer of sand. Next time I take some pics
          I'll see if this registers on my camera.

          I don't quite agree with Spider/Charles on the "months" part of his
          post. If you don't want to follow my suggestion of scooping out some
          of the tank bottom debris and setting it aside to dry--something that
          should occur pretty quickly if the material is not mostly water, you
          can still scoop out or siphon off almost all the water from the tank
          before allowing it to dry out--speeding the drying time.

          But I would still recommend Chip's Method for harvesting eggs because
          it works like a charm. You'll end up with a lot of eggs and not much
          water, allowing the eggs to dry in a few days. Once they are dry, yu
          can either put them into storage until you need them, or you might
          stress them with freezing, to simulate winter, or you can try
          hatching them right away.

          My biggest challenge raising T's from eggs I harvested is keeping
          them alive past 3 days. I think I tend to over-feed and thus the
          bacteria takes over, consuming all the available oxygen, and bye bye
          baby T's! I'm still trying to develop a fool-proof approach to this.

          In my own case I have T's in two aquaria, a 10 gal and a 20 gal. I
          bought a bunch of eggs from Joey Lewis which I will use to keep my
          generations coming along for the immediate future. I may set up a
          small tank to place one or two adults in for a week at a time to
          collect their eggs without having to break down either of the larger
          tanks.

          I've also been thinking about the possibilities of harvesting eggs
          from the brood pouches of recently deceased T's. I haven't dissected
          any of my babies once they've gone off to Triop Valhalla, but I want
          to. I need to arrange something with my sis-in-law, who's got skills
          in this area. If I can successfully get eggs in this manner it will
          be an interesting way of propogating my little pals--and would give
          their untimely deaths new meaning....heheheh.

          Where are you at with your T's, Denise? Sounds like you're still in
          the thinking stage, eh? Go for it, girl! They are way cooler than
          you might imagine. Plus, you sometimes get other interesting critters
          in the mix, even with Triassic Triops (Triops, Inc.) who keeps the
          eggs separate from the vegetation detritus tea-bags they include in
          their kits to condition the water. These tend to be daphnia (water
          fleas - a tiny crustacean that sorts of makes jerky, darting
          movements in the water--pretty interesting to watch, branchinecta (or
          another species?) which are Fairy Shrimp - they look like brine
          shrimp with their eyes on stalks and swimming with their legs facing
          up so they seem "upside down", and also clam shrimp, or possibly seed
          shrimp, which I've not detected in my hatchlings, as yet, but Paul's
          raised some and has pics of them in the Photos section of this group.

          Best of luck! Now go raise yourself some triops!


          vipal


          --- In triopsforever@y..., "amarugia_girl" <d_l_e_x2@y...> wrote:
          > So how easy are the eggs to see? I assume that they are TINY?
          > Also, we DO have a couple of ponds. Would the water work well for
          > starting the babies in? You were saying that with the coconut shell
          > you make a sort of paste, that you allow to dry out. Would the pond
          > silt be good for this?
          > Denise
        • amarugia_girl
          Vipal, I am still in the thinking stage though getting closer to trying it. *smile* Honestly, after our housefire, we moved into this crummy little trailer
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 1, 2002
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            Vipal,
            I am still in the "thinking" stage though getting closer to trying
            it. *smile* Honestly, after our housefire, we moved into this crummy
            little trailer until we finished building the new house. 1 1/2 yrs
            later we're still in the trailer.
            I have a 45 gal aquarium, and my 10 gal "feeder" tank where I raise
            fish for the big guy to eat.
            Yes, I'm a gal, but not squeamish! And I do like buggy critters. With
            the Triops being so large, yet aquatic, they have really piqued my
            interest.
            I basically like the really big and the really small. I have a huge
            draft horse stallion (www.amarugiahorse.com is our site), but I also
            have a tiny pocket puppy. The Triops would seem like a great Giant
            Bug project.
            I sure wish they lived longer though. You guys much get attached,
            only to have them die. That's a shame.
            How many eggs does one get it those packets? I would like to get
            enough eggs to have a good shot at trying reproduction. If I decide
            to do this I hate to give up the project after just a couple of
            months, you know?
            I did go through the photo albums and loved all the pics. These are
            just the coolest little guys!
            Okay, I've rambled way too long, so sorry!
            Still thinking but enjoying all I'm learning, Denise
          • charles taylor
            ... Well... ...the eggs ear easy to see with good eye site and they look like TINY orenge spheres. sorry but i don kknow about small ponds because they sre
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 1, 2002
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              --- amarugia_girl <d_l_e_x2@...> wrote:
              > So how easy are the eggs to see? I assume that they
              > are TINY?
              > Also, we DO have a couple of ponds. Would the water
              > work well for
              > starting the babies in? You were saying that with
              > the coconut shell
              > you make a sort of paste, that you allow to dry out.
              > Would the pond
              > silt be good for this?
              > Denise

              Well...
              ...the eggs ear easy to see with good eye site and
              they look like "TINY" orenge spheres.
              sorry but i don' kknow about small ponds because
              they sre ment to live in flash floods, thats why they
              have such short life spans.
              Most likley but red dirt found in hot dry areas is
              what works best. ;)
              E-mail me if you need any more help.
              -charles-




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            • vipalprem
              Hi Denise, Thanks for sharing about your living situation and so forth. T s are cool because they don t take up a lot of space--you can start em in a small
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 2, 2002
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                Hi Denise,

                Thanks for sharing about your living situation and so forth. T's are
                cool because they don't take up a lot of space--you can start 'em in
                a small fish bowl if you want. I like using aquaria because they're
                easier to maintain (don't have to change the water as frequently as
                in a non-filtered situation), and they permit the creation of more
                appealing environments to watch the Triops in.

                In terms of egg numbers, it depends on what packet or kit you're
                talking about. I have never tried counting the number of eggs in the
                Triops USA (our good buddy Joey Lewis's company) as they are mixed in
                with pond detritus, including the eggs (actually 'cysts') of other
                species like fairies, seed shrimp, and waterfleas.

                Triops, Inc. sells their eggs separately, and I've gotten them both
                in the small envelope as well as the little plastic container, which
                I assume comes with the larger kits with the tanks. I got the latter
                as a "replacement" when a batch didn't work out. I found that the
                plastic container had rougly twice the number of eggs that the
                envelopes have. I only counted the eggs from envelopes twice. Once
                there were 18, and on another occasion 13. I would recommend trying
                to use only half your eggs at a time, whichever approach you take.
                That way, if something goes wrong, you have a chance to adjust
                conditions before you risk the second half.

                Good luck, Denise!

                vipal
              • amarugia_girl
                That makes sense about trying only 1/2 the eggs the first time. So, do Triops need a cover on the tank/container? Do they re antics end them up out of water
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 5, 2002
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                  That makes sense about trying only 1/2 the eggs the first time. So,
                  do Triops need a cover on the tank/container? Do they're antics end
                  them up out of water ever?
                  Den
                • vipalprem
                  Aside from reducing the rate of evaporation, a cover is probably not necessary. I ve never seen them make a dash for the surface with sufficient speed that
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 5, 2002
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                    Aside from reducing the rate of evaporation, a cover is probably not
                    necessary. I've never seen them make a dash for the surface with
                    sufficient speed that they ever got out of the water, let alone, out
                    of the tank (although others may report differently). For my first
                    few months of Triops stewardship, before I got the larger aquaria, I
                    had my T's in a 2 gallon and a 1 gallon tank right next to my bed--I
                    sort of wondered in the beginning if I'd wake up with dead T's in my
                    bed, or worse (mouth)! Never happened.

                    Personally, I think it is highly unlikely that any would get out of
                    the water, let alone the tanks...

                    So...Denise...When are you going to get started?


                    vipal




                    --- In triopsforever@y..., "amarugia_girl" <d_l_e_x2@y...> wrote:
                    > That makes sense about trying only 1/2 the eggs the first time. So,
                    > do Triops need a cover on the tank/container? Do they're antics end
                    > them up out of water ever?
                    > Den
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