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Reading activities

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  • Melissa
    Bonjour à tous! I m so happy to have found this group...this will be my first year using Trésors du Temps and I can use all of the help I can get! Anyway, I
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 27, 2009
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      Bonjour à tous!

      I'm so happy to have found this group...this will be my first year using Trésors du Temps and I can use all of the help I can get!

      Anyway, I noticed that the textbook consists of lots and lots of reading. What sorts of activities do you all do to teach all of this reading in order to keep it from getting monotonous?

      Merci d'avance,
      Melissa
    • Deniece Zinnecker
      What I ve done with varying degrees of success is assign the students to read a paragraph or two on a particular topic, writing a 5 sentence summary of what
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 27, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        What I've done with varying degrees of success is assign the students to read a paragraph or two on a particular topic, writing a 5 sentence summary of what they read in French. The following day, they have a chance to pass their sentences around in a group of 3 students. The sentences are then peer edited. Then the group selects the top 3 sentences & writes them on the board.

        At this point, I can then go from sentence to sentence on the board, critiquing them for 2 things:
        1. Does the sentence accurately reflect the sense of what they read?
        2. Is the sentence correct grammatically? (I require them to write their sentences using the passé composé / imparfait)

        Of course, if there's a particular idea that got omitted, I feel free to write my own sentence about that on the board, and ask the students to critique it using the same standards that I just applied to their sentences.

        I always tell the students that they can feel free to copy down any sentences into their notes or edit their original sentences at this point based on what they see at the board. This helps them for the short essay portion of their test, where I will ask them to "explain the history of Massilia, including important people and dates", for example.

        Another thing that I ask them to do also is read the paragraph or two in advance, then the next day each of them takes a turn saying a sentence (they can read their pre-prepared summary sentences if they want) to their small group, until the topic is well-explained. Then I can popcorn from person to person, asking them to tell the story of what they read, in order and in detail. In theory they've been prepared to do this by writing summary sentences, and by telling it/listening to it in their small groups.

        Lastly, I try each day (although that doesn't always happen) to give their small group a chance to draw pictograms explaining what they read, talked about, as well as what I talked about. This can take 20 minutes or less per day. Each group has a large sheet of newsprint, and they can draw pictures, a few each day (no words or numbers), in order to tell the history of the particular étape. As they draw, the group decides on what they will say in French to narrate the history, using this picture as a memory aid. You must remind them of this oral part, since they frequently spend all of their time drawing pictures, or just talking about what picture to draw. This happens over a week and 1/2 to two weeks. Then, just before the written exam, I give them some other reading to do in class (the supplemental readings in the étapes work well, but so can a review before the written exam), and call up a group at a time, with their completed series of pictures, for an oral grade. I point to a picture, and ask a particular member of the group to explain it to me. The grade isn't huge (10-15 points), and part of the grade is for clarity & accuracy of the response, as well as for appropriate vocabulary & grammar (although the main point is to communicate the idea). Each student gets an individual grade at this point. If this is done the day or two before a written exam, the sheets can be posted around the room the day of the exam as a memory aid, if you wish.

        All of these ideas are done in French 4, where we use étapes 2-6; in French 5, étapes 7-12, I kind of abandon them in order to go through the chapters more quickly, and to vary it from French 4. At this point, the students do presentations or short papers during the second semester, and I don't really teach the lessons at all.

        Hope that this helps, & welcome to the "club" of Trésors users!

        Deniece Zinnecker
        Naperville Central High School

        ---
        On Mon, 7/27/09, Melissa <enfinprintemps@...> wrote:

        From: Melissa <enfinprintemps@...>
        Subject: [tresors_du_temps] Reading activities
        To: tresors_du_temps@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, July 27, 2009, 2:39 PM

         

        Bonjour à tous!

        I'm so happy to have found this group...this will be my first year using Trésors du Temps and I can use all of the help I can get!

        Anyway, I noticed that the textbook consists of lots and lots of reading. What sorts of activities do you all do to teach all of this reading in order to keep it from getting monotonous?

        Merci d'avance,
        Melissa

      • James O'Donnell
        Chère Melissa, Welcome the group. I will be using Tdt for the 4th time this year 09-10. I really did not care for it the first time I tried using it and I
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 27, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Chère Melissa,
           
          Welcome the group.  I will be using Tdt for the 4th time this year 09-10.  I really did not care for it the first time I tried using it and I had abandonded it by Feb. At that time, the extra ressouces that are found on this site had not been collected.  The next two years went better and I am expecting a great year now that I have covered étapes 1-9.
           
          The "méthode" Trésors du temps" appears to have a lot reading.  But in fact, for the students who are usually juniors and seniors, Tdt does not have a lot reading when compared to their other classes.  I try to be sypathetic to their workload by not requiring to much reading each night.  I am a firm believer in doing a little grammar and a little reading/culture or vocabulary each night.  I attach a lesson plan from the past year for review.  Etape 08 over 2.5 weeks.
           
          My French IV and V students who use Tdt over a two year period, have completed the Discovering French Bleu (lesson 32/28), Blanc (Leçon 30) and Rouge (unité 9) series.  My students arrive in French IV reading quite well.  Even in French III, I don't take time for "teaching reading".  We are finished with this methodology at the end of French II.  Of course we reveiw the comprehension questions and give personal opinions; but that's it.
           
          It is true, that in the begining, the French IV students find the reading to be a challenge. The nature of the reading is quite different from what they are used to in French III.  Rest assured, it only takes them a few weeks to get into the habit of reading more, and more quickly.  I spend only 2.5 to 3 weeks on each étape. We use a second grammar book to fill in.
           
          In Tdt, for the history sections, usually, I divide the readings into two parts and assign one half per night along with the appropriate comprehension questions from section in the text called, Parlons du texte. 1) I require my students to write in complete sentences, no use of a pronoun without first having used the noun, and 2) the responses must be fomulated so that I need not look at the question to know what the response is about. 
           
          We review the responses as a group in class and students are enouraged to correct errors and to discuss.  I collect this assignment 2/3 of the time. I don't have many students at this level, so I grade the sentences one by one.  One point for having responded to the question or having used the noun. One point for having written a response that doesn't require me to look at the question and one one point for grammar.  Minor mistakes and errors are not counted.  Too many mistakes or bad grammar mistakes are counted with a range from .25 to 1 point.  The grammar portion ends up being a third of the grade for this assignement. 
           
          On the third night, I assign other sections like, Pas à sa place and Vrai ou faux which require a review of what was read the two previous nights. We quickly review these in class the following day.  Almost each day we do some grammar. 
           
          To avoid the monotony of the book, I try to teach the étapes in chunks.  The chunks are broken up with varoius activities: a video, PowerPoint Jeopardy, music/song/art, practice for the AP exam. Also, after each étape, we change books, and we go to the grammar book (En bonne forme (year A) and in (year (B) French for Oral and Written Review.  We study a chapter from the grammar book and then return to Tdt. 
           
          I should mention that I follow the same pattern for the literature sections.  I always test grammar seperately from the history and literature. The grammar in Tdt is very weak. A second book like En bonne form is highly recommended.
           
          My syllabi are on APexchanges under Files > AP Syllabi, shared by members > AP French Language Syllabi > James O'Donnell.
           
           
          I just fixed the link to the student / teacher ressource page http://www.quia.com/pages/tresorstemps.html on the site.
           
          Best of luck,
           
          James O'
           

          To: tresors_du_temps@yahoogroups.com
          From: enfinprintemps@...
          Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 19:39:50 +0000
          Subject: [tresors_du_temps] Reading activities

           
          Bonjour à tous!

          I'm so happy to have found this group...this will be my first year using Trésors du Temps and I can use all of the help I can get!

          Anyway, I noticed that the textbook consists of lots and lots of reading. What sorts of activities do you all do to teach all of this reading in order to keep it from getting monotonous?

          Merci d'avance,
          Melissa




          Perdu dans tous vos carnets d'adresses ? Rassemblez vos contacts Windows Live, Facebook, LinkedIn…
        • Melissa Sellars
          Thanks again for the ideas! I like the idea of doing popcorn sentences to summarize the reading. When you assign a paragraph to students, do you typically
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 28, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks again for the ideas! I like the idea of doing "popcorn" sentences to summarize the reading. When you assign a paragraph to students, do you typically assign them all the same one or do you vary it to cover the entire reading?

            I really love the pictogram idea as well...I've found that students of all ages love to draw!

            --- On Mon, 7/27/09, Deniece Zinnecker <cdzinnecker@...> wrote:

            From: Deniece Zinnecker <cdzinnecker@...>
            Subject: Re: [tresors_du_temps] Reading activities
            To: tresors_du_temps@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, July 27, 2009, 3:07 PM

             

            What I've done with varying degrees of success is assign the students to read a paragraph or two on a particular topic, writing a 5 sentence summary of what they read in French. The following day, they have a chance to pass their sentences around in a group of 3 students. The sentences are then peer edited. Then the group selects the top 3 sentences & writes them on the board.

            At this point, I can then go from sentence to sentence on the board, critiquing them for 2 things:
            1. Does the sentence accurately reflect the sense of what they read?
            2. Is the sentence correct grammatically? (I require them to write their sentences using the passé composé / imparfait)

            Of course, if there's a particular idea that got omitted, I feel free to write my own sentence about that on the board, and ask the students to critique it using the same standards that I just applied to their sentences.

            I always tell the students that they can feel free to copy down any sentences into their notes or edit their original sentences at this point based on what they see at the board. This helps them for the short essay portion of their test, where I will ask them to "explain the history of Massilia, including important people and dates", for example.

            Another thing that I ask them to do also is read the paragraph or two in advance, then the next day each of them takes a turn saying a sentence (they can read their pre-prepared summary sentences if they want) to their small group, until the topic is well-explained. Then I can popcorn from person to person, asking them to tell the story of what they read, in order and in detail. In theory they've been prepared to do this by writing summary sentences, and by telling it/listening to it in their small groups.

            Lastly, I try each day (although that doesn't always happen) to give their small group a chance to draw pictograms explaining what they read, talked about, as well as what I talked about. This can take 20 minutes or less per day. Each group has a large sheet of newsprint, and they can draw pictures, a few each day (no words or numbers), in order to tell the history of the particular étape. As they draw, the group decides on what they will say in French to narrate the history, using this picture as a memory aid. You must remind them of this oral part, since they frequently spend all of their time drawing pictures, or just talking about what picture to draw. This happens over a week and 1/2 to two weeks. Then, just before the written exam, I give them some other reading to do in class (the supplemental readings in the étapes work well, but so can a review before the written exam), and call up a group at a time, with their completed series of pictures, for an oral grade. I point to a picture, and ask a particular member of the group to explain it to me. The grade isn't huge (10-15 points), and part of the grade is for clarity & accuracy of the response, as well as for appropriate vocabulary & grammar (although the main point is to communicate the idea). Each student gets an individual grade at this point. If this is done the day or two before a written exam, the sheets can be posted around the room the day of the exam as a memory aid, if you wish.

            All of these ideas are done in French 4, where we use étapes 2-6; in French 5, étapes 7-12, I kind of abandon them in order to go through the chapters more quickly, and to vary it from French 4. At this point, the students do presentations or short papers during the second semester, and I don't really teach the lessons at all.

            Hope that this helps, & welcome to the "club" of Trésors users!

            Deniece Zinnecker
            Naperville Central High School

            --- On Mon, 7/27/09, Melissa <enfinprintemps@ yahoo.com> wrote:

            From: Melissa <enfinprintemps@ yahoo.com>
            Subject: [tresors_du_ temps] Reading activities
            To: tresors_du_temps@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Monday, July 27, 2009, 2:39 PM

             

            Bonjour à tous!

            I'm so happy to have found this group...this will be my first year using Trésors du Temps and I can use all of the help I can get!

            Anyway, I noticed that the textbook consists of lots and lots of reading. What sorts of activities do you all do to teach all of this reading in order to keep it from getting monotonous?

            Merci d'avance,
            Melissa


          • Melissa Sellars
            Merci James, I agree that the reading should be split up so as not to overwhelm students. It seems like there is a lot of information in each reading about
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 28, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Merci James,

              I agree that the reading should be split up so as not to overwhelm students. It seems like there is a lot of information in each reading about historical events, so I'm planning on splitting them into sections and focusing on certain topics at a time.

              Thanks for the good ideas!

              --- On Mon, 7/27/09, James O'Donnell <mnodonne@...> wrote:

              From: James O'Donnell <mnodonne@...>
              Subject: RE: [tresors_du_temps] Reading activities [3 Attachments]
              To: tresors_du_temps@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, July 27, 2009, 4:38 PM

               

              Chère Melissa,
               
              Welcome the group.  I will be using Tdt for the 4th time this year 09-10.  I really did not care for it the first time I tried using it and I had abandonded it by Feb. At that time, the extra ressouces that are found on this site had not been collected.  The next two years went better and I am expecting a great year now that I have covered étapes 1-9.
               
              The "méthode" Trésors du temps" appears to have a lot reading.  But in fact, for the students who are usually juniors and seniors, Tdt does not have a lot reading when compared to their other classes.  I try to be sypathetic to their workload by not requiring to much reading each night.  I am a firm believer in doing a little grammar and a little reading/culture or vocabulary each night.  I attach a lesson plan from the past year for review.  Etape 08 over 2.5 weeks.
               
              My French IV and V students who use Tdt over a two year period, have completed the Discovering French Bleu (lesson 32/28), Blanc (Leçon 30) and Rouge (unité 9) series.  My students arrive in French IV reading quite well.  Even in French III, I don't take time for "teaching reading".  We are finished with this methodology at the end of French II.  Of course we reveiw the comprehension questions and give personal opinions; but that's it.
               
              It is true, that in the begining, the French IV students find the reading to be a challenge. The nature of the reading is quite different from what they are used to in French III.  Rest assured, it only takes them a few weeks to get into the habit of reading more, and more quickly.  I spend only 2.5 to 3 weeks on each étape. We use a second grammar book to fill in.
               
              In Tdt, for the history sections, usually, I divide the readings into two parts and assign one half per night along with the appropriate comprehension questions from section in the text called, Parlons du texte. 1) I require my students to write in complete sentences, no use of a pronoun without first having used the noun, and 2) the responses must be fomulated so that I need not look at the question to know what the response is about. 
               
              We review the responses as a group in class and students are enouraged to correct errors and to discuss.  I collect this assignment 2/3 of the time. I don't have many students at this level, so I grade the sentences one by one.  One point for having responded to the question or having used the noun. One point for having written a response that doesn't require me to look at the question and one one point for grammar.  Minor mistakes and errors are not counted.  Too many mistakes or bad grammar mistakes are counted with a range from .25 to 1 point.  The grammar portion ends up being a third of the grade for this assignement. 
               
              On the third night, I assign other sections like, Pas à sa place and Vrai ou faux which require a review of what was read the two previous nights. We quickly review these in class the following day.  Almost each day we do some grammar. 
               
              To avoid the monotony of the book, I try to teach the étapes in chunks.  The chunks are broken up with varoius activities: a video, PowerPoint Jeopardy, music/song/art, practice for the AP exam. Also, after each étape, we change books, and we go to the grammar book (En bonne forme (year A) and in (year (B) French for Oral and Written Review.  We study a chapter from the grammar book and then return to Tdt. 
               
              I should mention that I follow the same pattern for the literature sections.  I always test grammar seperately from the history and literature. The grammar in Tdt is very weak. A second book like En bonne form is highly recommended.
               
              My syllabi are on APexchanges under Files > AP Syllabi, shared by members > AP French Language Syllabi > James O'Donnell.
               
               
              I just fixed the link to the student / teacher ressource page http://www.quia. com/pages/ tresorstemps. html on the site.
               
              Best of luck,
               
              James O'
               


              To: tresors_du_temps@ yahoogroups. com
              From: enfinprintemps@ yahoo.com
              Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 19:39:50 +0000
              Subject: [tresors_du_ temps] Reading activities

               
              Bonjour à tous!

              I'm so happy to have found this group...this will be my first year using Trésors du Temps and I can use all of the help I can get!

              Anyway, I noticed that the textbook consists of lots and lots of reading. What sorts of activities do you all do to teach all of this reading in order to keep it from getting monotonous?

              Merci d'avance,
              Melissa




              Perdu dans tous vos carnets d'adresses ? Rassemblez vos contacts Windows Live, Facebook, LinkedIn…

            • Deniece Zinnecker
              When I assign a reading, all students read the same paragraph or two in the same evening. That way, when sentences are put up on the board, everyone has a
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 28, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                When I assign a reading, all students read the same paragraph or two in the same evening. That way, when sentences are put up on the board, everyone has a similar understanding of what they read, even if they missed some details here and there. I then use powerpoints to expand on it--I believe that James O moved them over to the Trésors files from the AP French files.

                Bonne chance cette année!
                Deniece Zinnecker

                --- On Tue, 7/28/09, Melissa Sellars <enfinprintemps@...> wrote:

                From: Melissa Sellars <enfinprintemps@...>
                Subject: Re: [tresors_du_temps] Reading activities
                To: tresors_du_temps@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tuesday, July 28, 2009, 12:59 PM

                 

                Thanks again for the ideas! I like the idea of doing "popcorn" sentences to summarize the reading. When you assign a paragraph to students, do you typically assign them all the same one or do you vary it to cover the entire reading?

                I really love the pictogram idea as well...I've found that students of all ages love to draw!

                --- On Mon, 7/27/09, Deniece Zinnecker <cdzinnecker@ prodigy.net> wrote:

                From: Deniece Zinnecker <cdzinnecker@ prodigy.net>
                Subject: Re: [tresors_du_ temps] Reading activities
                To: tresors_du_temps@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Monday, July 27, 2009, 3:07 PM

                 

                What I've done with varying degrees of success is assign the students to read a paragraph or two on a particular topic, writing a 5 sentence summary of what they read in French. The following day, they have a chance to pass their sentences around in a group of 3 students. The sentences are then peer edited. Then the group selects the top 3 sentences & writes them on the board.

                At this point, I can then go from sentence to sentence on the board, critiquing them for 2 things:
                1. Does the sentence accurately reflect the sense of what they read?
                2. Is the sentence correct grammatically? (I require them to write their sentences using the passé composé / imparfait)

                Of course, if there's a particular idea that got omitted, I feel free to write my own sentence about that on the board, and ask the students to critique it using the same standards that I just applied to their sentences.

                I always tell the students that they can feel free to copy down any sentences into their notes or edit their original sentences at this point based on what they see at the board. This helps them for the short essay portion of their test, where I will ask them to "explain the history of Massilia, including important people and dates", for example.

                Another thing that I ask them to do also is read the paragraph or two in advance, then the next day each of them takes a turn saying a sentence (they can read their pre-prepared summary sentences if they want) to their small group, until the topic is well-explained. Then I can popcorn from person to person, asking them to tell the story of what they read, in order and in detail. In theory they've been prepared to do this by writing summary sentences, and by telling it/listening to it in their small groups.

                Lastly, I try each day (although that doesn't always happen) to give their small group a chance to draw pictograms explaining what they read, talked about, as well as what I talked about. This can take 20 minutes or less per day. Each group has a large sheet of newsprint, and they can draw pictures, a few each day (no words or numbers), in order to tell the history of the particular étape. As they draw, the group decides on what they will say in French to narrate the history, using this picture as a memory aid. You must remind them of this oral part, since they frequently spend all of their time drawing pictures, or just talking about what picture to draw. This happens over a week and 1/2 to two weeks. Then, just before the written exam, I give them some other reading to do in class (the supplemental readings in the étapes work well, but so can a review before the written exam), and call up a group at a time, with their completed series of pictures, for an oral grade. I point to a picture, and ask a particular member of the group to explain it to me. The grade isn't huge (10-15 points), and part of the grade is for clarity & accuracy of the response, as well as for appropriate vocabulary & grammar (although the main point is to communicate the idea). Each student gets an individual grade at this point. If this is done the day or two before a written exam, the sheets can be posted around the room the day of the exam as a memory aid, if you wish.

                All of these ideas are done in French 4, where we use étapes 2-6; in French 5, étapes 7-12, I kind of abandon them in order to go through the chapters more quickly, and to vary it from French 4. At this point, the students do presentations or short papers during the second semester, and I don't really teach the lessons at all.

                Hope that this helps, & welcome to the "club" of Trésors users!

                Deniece Zinnecker
                Naperville Central High School

                --- On Mon, 7/27/09, Melissa <enfinprintemps@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                From: Melissa <enfinprintemps@ yahoo.com>
                Subject: [tresors_du_ temps] Reading activities
                To: tresors_du_temps@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Monday, July 27, 2009, 2:39 PM

                 

                Bonjour à tous!

                I'm so happy to have found this group...this will be my first year using Trésors du Temps and I can use all of the help I can get!

                Anyway, I noticed that the textbook consists of lots and lots of reading. What sorts of activities do you all do to teach all of this reading in order to keep it from getting monotonous?

                Merci d'avance,
                Melissa


              • Deniece Zinnecker
                Whoops! James politely reminded me that not all of my files got moved over by him. So, when I get my laptop back from repairs, sometime in the next few weeks,
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 28, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Whoops! James politely reminded me that not all of my files got moved over by him. So, when I get my laptop back from repairs, sometime in the next few weeks, I'll upload my presentations & Jeopardy review games for Trésors for you to peruse.

                  Sorry about the confusion on my part--
                  Deniece Zinnecker

                  --- On Tue, 7/28/09, Deniece Zinnecker <cdzinnecker@...> wrote:

                  From: Deniece Zinnecker <cdzinnecker@...>
                  Subject: Re: [tresors_du_temps] Reading activities
                  To: tresors_du_temps@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, July 28, 2009, 3:07 PM

                   

                  When I assign a reading, all students read the same paragraph or two in the same evening. That way, when sentences are put up on the board, everyone has a similar understanding of what they read, even if they missed some details here and there. I then use powerpoints to expand on it--I believe that James O moved them over to the Trésors files from the AP French files.

                  Bonne chance cette année!
                  Deniece Zinnecker

                  --- On Tue, 7/28/09, Melissa Sellars <enfinprintemps@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                  From: Melissa Sellars <enfinprintemps@ yahoo.com>
                  Subject: Re: [tresors_du_ temps] Reading activities
                  To: tresors_du_temps@ yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Tuesday, July 28, 2009, 12:59 PM

                   

                  Thanks again for the ideas! I like the idea of doing "popcorn" sentences to summarize the reading. When you assign a paragraph to students, do you typically assign them all the same one or do you vary it to cover the entire reading?

                  I really love the pictogram idea as well...I've found that students of all ages love to draw!

                  --- On Mon, 7/27/09, Deniece Zinnecker <cdzinnecker@ prodigy.net> wrote:

                  From: Deniece Zinnecker <cdzinnecker@ prodigy.net>
                  Subject: Re: [tresors_du_ temps] Reading activities
                  To: tresors_du_temps@ yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Monday, July 27, 2009, 3:07 PM

                   

                  What I've done with varying degrees of success is assign the students to read a paragraph or two on a particular topic, writing a 5 sentence summary of what they read in French. The following day, they have a chance to pass their sentences around in a group of 3 students. The sentences are then peer edited. Then the group selects the top 3 sentences & writes them on the board.

                  At this point, I can then go from sentence to sentence on the board, critiquing them for 2 things:
                  1. Does the sentence accurately reflect the sense of what they read?
                  2. Is the sentence correct grammatically? (I require them to write their sentences using the passé composé / imparfait)

                  Of course, if there's a particular idea that got omitted, I feel free to write my own sentence about that on the board, and ask the students to critique it using the same standards that I just applied to their sentences.

                  I always tell the students that they can feel free to copy down any sentences into their notes or edit their original sentences at this point based on what they see at the board. This helps them for the short essay portion of their test, where I will ask them to "explain the history of Massilia, including important people and dates", for example.

                  Another thing that I ask them to do also is read the paragraph or two in advance, then the next day each of them takes a turn saying a sentence (they can read their pre-prepared summary sentences if they want) to their small group, until the topic is well-explained. Then I can popcorn from person to person, asking them to tell the story of what they read, in order and in detail. In theory they've been prepared to do this by writing summary sentences, and by telling it/listening to it in their small groups.

                  Lastly, I try each day (although that doesn't always happen) to give their small group a chance to draw pictograms explaining what they read, talked about, as well as what I talked about. This can take 20 minutes or less per day. Each group has a large sheet of newsprint, and they can draw pictures, a few each day (no words or numbers), in order to tell the history of the particular étape. As they draw, the group decides on what they will say in French to narrate the history, using this picture as a memory aid. You must remind them of this oral part, since they frequently spend all of their time drawing pictures, or just talking about what picture to draw. This happens over a week and 1/2 to two weeks. Then, just before the written exam, I give them some other reading to do in class (the supplemental readings in the étapes work well, but so can a review before the written exam), and call up a group at a time, with their completed series of pictures, for an oral grade. I point to a picture, and ask a particular member of the group to explain it to me. The grade isn't huge (10-15 points), and part of the grade is for clarity & accuracy of the response, as well as for appropriate vocabulary & grammar (although the main point is to communicate the idea). Each student gets an individual grade at this point. If this is done the day or two before a written exam, the sheets can be posted around the room the day of the exam as a memory aid, if you wish.

                  All of these ideas are done in French 4, where we use étapes 2-6; in French 5, étapes 7-12, I kind of abandon them in order to go through the chapters more quickly, and to vary it from French 4. At this point, the students do presentations or short papers during the second semester, and I don't really teach the lessons at all.

                  Hope that this helps, & welcome to the "club" of Trésors users!

                  Deniece Zinnecker
                  Naperville Central High School

                  --- On Mon, 7/27/09, Melissa <enfinprintemps@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                  From: Melissa <enfinprintemps@ yahoo.com>
                  Subject: [tresors_du_ temps] Reading activities
                  To: tresors_du_temps@ yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Monday, July 27, 2009, 2:39 PM

                   

                  Bonjour à tous!

                  I'm so happy to have found this group...this will be my first year using Trésors du Temps and I can use all of the help I can get!

                  Anyway, I noticed that the textbook consists of lots and lots of reading. What sorts of activities do you all do to teach all of this reading in order to keep it from getting monotonous?

                  Merci d'avance,
                  Melissa


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