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Re: [transmonde] Transmondes still in use

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  • Kenneth Crudup
    ... You re right- but I ve got mobile-update running (which doesn t hit the disk ever 30 sec) and I ve got APM enabled in my kernel
    Message 1 of 15 , Nov 2, 2001
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      On Fri, 2 Nov 2001, Dan Christensen wrote:

      > With my BIOS set to "suspend to RAM", "apm -s" does a suspend to
      > RAM, but "apm -S" just spins down the hard drive and makes the
      > screen go black (but not *blank*, it is still on). Even worse,
      > the hard drive spins back up and the screen is redisplayed after
      > about 1 second.

      Ah- I've seen this. Read on:

      > I wonder why it works for you and not for me.

      You're right- but I've got "mobile-update" running (which doesn't hit the
      disk ever 30 sec) and I've got APM <mumble something> enabled in my
      kernel config. Mine will stay "off"ish (I get the same things you see
      when I "Suspend to RAM", IIRC).

      My screen does blank, however, after the screen-timeout I've got set in
      the BIOS.

      -Kenny

      --
      Kenneth R. Crudup Sr. SW Engineer, Scott County Consulting, Washington, D.C.
      Home1: PO Box 914 Silver Spring, MD 20910-0914 kenny@...
      Home2: 38010 Village Cmn. #217 Fremont, CA 94536-7525 (510) 745-0101
      Work: 5141 California Suite 200, Irvine, CA 92612 (949) 737-2785
    • Dan Christensen
      ... I think what you are doing is different from suspend to RAM. With what you are doing, your cpu, video chip, sound chip, RAM, ... are all still running.
      Message 2 of 15 , Nov 2, 2001
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        Kenneth Crudup <kenny@...> writes:

        > You're right- but I've got "mobile-update" running (which doesn't hit the
        > disk ever 30 sec) and I've got APM <mumble something> enabled in my
        > kernel config. Mine will stay "off"ish (I get the same things you see
        > when I "Suspend to RAM", IIRC).

        I think what you are doing is different from suspend to RAM. With
        what you are doing, your cpu, video chip, sound chip, RAM, ... are
        all still running. With suspend to RAM, they are all completely
        shut off, except for the RAM. No need to worry about the update
        daemon, since the cpu isn't running *any* processes.

        As a test, you could see how long your machine lasts on battery power
        after "apm -S". I suspect it will be about 5 hours. With suspend to
        RAM, my machine can last something like 24 hours.

        Dan
      • Kenneth Crudup
        ... 11H. I accidentally did this once. (Hell, back when my battery was new, I d get 5H of normal use *on*! :-) ... *Really*?! Before I got a Vivante SE, I d
        Message 3 of 15 , Nov 2, 2001
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          On Fri, 2 Nov 2001, Dan Christensen wrote:

          > As a test, you could see how long your machine lasts on battery power
          > after "apm -S". I suspect it will be about 5 hours.

          11H. I accidentally did this once. (Hell, back when my battery was new,
          I'd get 5H of normal use *on*! :-)

          > With suspend to RAM, my machine can last something like 24 hours.

          *Really*?!

          Before I got a Vivante SE, I'd had a <damn, it's been three years now> Vibrant
          LS (IIRC). This machine didn't have S2D, just S2R, and I recall only getting
          about 8 hrs before the batteries just up and died. I could never figure out
          what the appeal of S2R *was* after that.

          Why do you use it? Even with 128MB of RAM, I'm up and running in < 30 secs
          after power-on.

          -Kenny

          --
          Kenneth R. Crudup Sr. SW Engineer, Scott County Consulting, Washington, D.C.
          Home1: PO Box 914 Silver Spring, MD 20910-0914 kenny@...
          Home2: 38010 Village Cmn. #217 Fremont, CA 94536-7525 (510) 745-0101
          Work: 5141 California Suite 200, Irvine, CA 92612 (949) 737-2785
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