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  • Norman Darlington
    A 1689 hokku of Basho s that s giving me some trouble; I wonder can anyone help? Fuyu-niwa ya tsuki mo ito naru mushi no gin 冬庭や
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 1, 2006
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      A 1689 hokku of Basho's that's giving me some trouble; I wonder can
      anyone help?

      Fuyu-niwa ya tsuki mo ito naru mushi no gin
      冬庭や 月もいとなる 虫の吟
      winter-garden|:|moon|also|thread|being|insect|'s|recitation

      Above a wintry garden
      the moon thins to a thread:
      insect's singing.
      (Makoto Ueda 1970)

      the winter garden—
      thinning to a thread, the moon
      and an insect's singing
      (Makoto Ueda 1992)

      While Ueda's later translation seems to accord better with the
      original, in terms of placement of the cut, it also introduces a note
      of unclarity regarding the role of the insect's 'singing'. Can anyone
      suggest what is really happening here?

      Thanks for any help
      Best wishes
      Norman
    • lbolenyc
      ... Dear Norman, Ueda s first translation is from his biography of Basho. Ueda includes it in a group of five haiku which he feels exemplifies the concept of
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 3, 2006
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        --- In translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com, "Norman Darlington"
        <norman@...> wrote:
        >
        > A 1689 hokku of Basho's that's giving me some trouble; I wonder can
        > anyone help?
        >
        > Fuyu-niwa ya tsuki mo ito naru mushi no gin
        > 冬庭や
        >月もいとなる
        >虫の吟
        > winter-garden|:|moon|also|thread|being|insect|'s|recitation
        >
        > Above a wintry garden
        > the moon thins to a thread:
        > insect's singing.
        > (Makoto Ueda 1970)
        >
        > the winter garden—
        > thinning to a thread, the moon
        > and an insect's singing
        > (Makoto Ueda 1992)
        >
        > While Ueda's later translation seems to accord better with the
        > original, in terms of placement of the cut, it also introduces a
        >note
        > of unclarity regarding the role of the insect's 'singing'. Can
        >anyone
        > suggest what is really happening here?
        >
        > Thanks for any help
        > Best wishes
        > Norman
        >

        Dear Norman,

        Ueda's first translation is from his biography of Basho. Ueda
        includes it in a group of five haiku which he feels exemplifies the
        concept of 'sabi'. He goes on to say that this and the other haiku in
        the group "centers on the merging of the temporal into the eternal,
        of the mutable into the indestructible, of the tiny and finite into
        the vast and infinite, out of which emerges a primeval lonely feeling
        shared by all things in this world."

        The second time Ueda translates it, in "Basho and His Interpreters,"
        he points out that the haiku was written in Ueno to start an eighteen-
        verse sequence of haikai.

        Ueda quotes Shuuson:

        "As the poet listened intently, the cry of an insect that was barely
        surviving the winter nights sounded as thin as a thread. As if that
        singing crystallized into a visual image, a thin moon hung in the
        sky."

        Other translations:

        Winter garden,
        the moon thinned to a thread,
        insects singing.

        tr. Hass


        Insect song - over
        winter's garden
        moon's hair-thin.

        tr. Stryk


        Larry
      • Norman Darlington
        ... Thank you very much, Larry, Dennis, Gabi. Larry s quote from Ueda about sabi is wonderful. I have both those books - now I m prompted to go back and enjoy
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 4, 2006
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          --- In translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com, "lbolenyc" <lbolenyc@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com, "Norman Darlington"
          > <norman@> wrote:
          > >
          > > A 1689 hokku of Basho's that's giving me some trouble; I wonder can
          > > anyone help?
          > >
          > > Fuyu-niwa ya tsuki mo ito naru mushi no gin
          > > winter-garden|:|moon|also|thread|being|insect|'s|recitation
          > >
          > > Above a wintry garden
          > > the moon thins to a thread:
          > > insect's singing.
          > > (Makoto Ueda 1970)
          > >
          > > the winter garden—
          > > thinning to a thread, the moon
          > > and an insect's singing
          > > (Makoto Ueda 1992)
          > >
          > > While Ueda's later translation seems to accord better with the
          > > original, in terms of placement of the cut, it also introduces a
          > >note
          > > of unclarity regarding the role of the insect's 'singing'. Can
          > >anyone
          > > suggest what is really happening here?
          > >
          > > Thanks for any help
          > > Best wishes
          > > Norman
          > >
          >
          > Dear Norman,
          >
          > Ueda's first translation is from his biography of Basho. Ueda
          > includes it in a group of five haiku which he feels exemplifies the
          > concept of 'sabi'. He goes on to say that this and the other haiku in
          > the group "centers on the merging of the temporal into the eternal,
          > of the mutable into the indestructible, of the tiny and finite into
          > the vast and infinite, out of which emerges a primeval lonely feeling
          > shared by all things in this world."
          >
          > The second time Ueda translates it, in "Basho and His Interpreters,"
          > he points out that the haiku was written in Ueno to start an eighteen-
          > verse sequence of haikai.
          >
          > Ueda quotes Shuuson:
          >
          > "As the poet listened intently, the cry of an insect that was barely
          > surviving the winter nights sounded as thin as a thread. As if that
          > singing crystallized into a visual image, a thin moon hung in the
          > sky."
          >
          > Other translations:
          >
          > Winter garden,
          > the moon thinned to a thread,
          > insects singing.
          >
          > tr. Hass
          >
          >
          > Insect song - over
          > winter's garden
          > moon's hair-thin.
          >
          > tr. Stryk
          >
          >
          > Larry
          >


          Thank you very much, Larry, Dennis, Gabi. Larry's quote from Ueda
          about sabi is wonderful. I have both those books - now I'm prompted to
          go back and enjoy them once more.

          Best wishes
          Norman
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