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Mount Kaguyama in Nara

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  • Greve Gabi
    haru nare ya na mo naki yama no usugasumi it is becoming spring - on a mountain without a name there is light mist Matsuo Basho (Tr. Gabi Greve) Basho at Mount
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2012
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      haru nare ya na mo naki yama no usugasumi

      it is becoming spring -
      on a mountain without a name
      there is light mist

      Matsuo Basho
      (Tr. Gabi Greve)

      Basho at Mount Kaguyama in Nara . . .

      More poems and reference  is here
      http://traveloguegokuraku.blogspot.jp/2012/06/kaguyama-nara.html

      Gabi



      .
    • lbolenyc
      Here is Hitomaro s waka, which is viewed as being an inspiration for Basho s haiku: Hisakata no / ama no Kaguyama / kono yûbe / kasumi tanabiku / haru tatsu
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 3, 2012
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        Here is Hitomaro's waka, which is viewed as being an inspiration for Basho's haiku:

        Hisakata no / ama no Kaguyama / kono yûbe / kasumi tanabiku / haru tatsu rashimo

             In the eternal sky,
        Mount Kagu,
             And round it,
        Lines of mist this evening:
        Spring has come, it seems.

        trans. Blyth

        In a poetry tradition that had many prescribed poetic subjects such as famous places like Mt. Kagu, the haikai of Basho's haiku is in his use of an anonymous place as a poetic subject, yet seeing it in much the same way as Hitomaru saw Mt. Kagu. In some ways this strikes me as a radical transformation of the tradition.

        Basho's haiku appears in  his travel journal, "Bleached Bones in a Field" (Nozarashi kikoo).

        Larry

        P.S. Barnhill points out that in an earlier version, Basho used asagasumi (morning mist) in place of usugasumi (thin mist). I wonder what led Basho to make the change.

        And Henderson says that the opening phrase haru nare ya is almost "Is it because of spring?"

        --- In translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com, Greve Gabi <gokurakuatworldkigo@...> wrote:
        >
        > haru nare ya na mo naki yama no usugasumi
        >
        > it is becoming spring -
        > on a mountain without a name
        > there is light mist
        >
        > Matsuo Basho
        > (Tr. Gabi Greve)
        >
        > Basho at Mount Kaguyama in Nara . . .
        >
        > More poems and reference is here
        > http://traveloguegokuraku.blogspot.jp/2012/06/kaguyama-nara.html
        >
        > Gabi
        >
        > <http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-j32jvXxlOx0/T8ln09l777I/AAAAAAAAlT8/gZZIoeRbT-Q/s1600/jito%2Btenno.jpg>
        >
        > .
        >
      • Greve Gabi
        Thanks a lot, Larry ! here is another translation of the HISAKATA poem, which I had quoted in the BLOG Distant on Mount Kagu of the Heavens this evening the
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 3, 2012
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          Thanks a lot, Larry !
          here is another translation of the HISAKATA poem, which I had quoted
          in the BLOG

          Distant
          on Mount Kagu of the Heavens
          this evening
          the mist trailing
          spring seems to have arrived

          Tr. Jakuren


          hisakata ...
          distant, in the eternal sky ... so many ways to translate.

          http://dic.yahoo.co.jp/dsearch?enc=UTF-8&p=%E4%B9%85%E6%96%B9&dtype=0&dname=0na&stype=0&pagenum=1&index=15417900

          Gabi

          >
          > Here is Hitomaro's waka, which is viewed as being an inspiration for
          > Basho's haiku:
          >
          > Hisakata no / ama no Kaguyama / kono yûbe / kasumi tanabiku / haru tatsu
          > rashimo
          >
          >      In the eternal sky,
          > Mount Kagu,
          >      And round it,
          > Lines of mist this evening:
          > Spring has come, it seems.
          >
          > trans. Blyth
          >
          > In a poetry tradition that had many prescribed poetic subjects such as
          > famous places like Mt. Kagu, the haikai of Basho's haiku is in his use of an
          > anonymous place as a poetic subject, yet seeing it in much the same way as
          > Hitomaru saw Mt. Kagu. In some ways this strikes me as a radical
          > transformation of the tradition.
          >
          > Basho's haiku appears in  his travel journal, "Bleached Bones in a Field"
          > (Nozarashi kikoo).
          >
          > Larry
          >
          > P.S. Barnhill points out that in an earlier version, Basho used asagasumi
          > (morning mist) in place of usugasumi (thin mist). I wonder what led Basho to
          > make the change.
          >
          > And Henderson says that the opening phrase haru nare ya is almost "Is it
          > because of spring?"
          >

          > >
          > > haru nare ya na mo naki yama no usugasumi
          > >
          > > it is becoming spring -
          > > on a mountain without a name
          > > there is light mist
          > >
          > > Matsuo Basho
          > > (Tr. Gabi Greve)
          > >
          > > Basho at Mount Kaguyama in Nara . . .
          > >
          > > More poems and reference is here
          > > http://traveloguegokuraku.blogspot.jp/2012/06/kaguyama-nara.html
          > >
          > > Gabi
          > >
          >
        • lbolenyc
          Dear Gabi, Thanks for pointing out that a translation of the Hitomaro waka is on the blog. Somehow I missed it there. I apologize for my bad habit of sometimes
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 4, 2012
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            Dear Gabi,

            Thanks for pointing out that a translation of the Hitomaro waka is on the blog. Somehow I missed it there. I apologize for my bad habit of sometimes skim-reading too fast.

            Larry

            --- In translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com, Greve Gabi <gokurakuatworldkigo@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks a lot, Larry !
            > here is another translation of the HISAKATA poem, which I had quoted
            > in the BLOG
            >
            > Distant
            > on Mount Kagu of the Heavens
            > this evening
            > the mist trailing
            > spring seems to have arrived
            >
            > Tr. Jakuren
            >
            >
            > hisakata ...
            > distant, in the eternal sky ... so many ways to translate.
            >
            > http://dic.yahoo.co.jp/dsearch?enc=UTF-8&p=%E4%B9%85%E6%96%B9&dtype=0&dname=0na&stype=0&pagenum=1&index=15417900
            >
            > Gabi
            >
            > >
            > > Here is Hitomaro's waka, which is viewed as being an inspiration for
            > > Basho's haiku:
            > >
            > > Hisakata no / ama no Kaguyama / kono yûbe / kasumi tanabiku / haru tatsu
            > > rashimo
            > >
            > >      In the eternal sky,
            > > Mount Kagu,
            > >      And round it,
            > > Lines of mist this evening:
            > > Spring has come, it seems.
            > >
            > > trans. Blyth
            > >
            > > In a poetry tradition that had many prescribed poetic subjects such as
            > > famous places like Mt. Kagu, the haikai of Basho's haiku is in his use of an
            > > anonymous place as a poetic subject, yet seeing it in much the same way as
            > > Hitomaru saw Mt. Kagu. In some ways this strikes me as a radical
            > > transformation of the tradition.
            > >
            > > Basho's haiku appears in  his travel journal, "Bleached Bones in a Field"
            > > (Nozarashi kikoo).
            > >
            > > Larry
            > >
            > > P.S. Barnhill points out that in an earlier version, Basho used asagasumi
            > > (morning mist) in place of usugasumi (thin mist). I wonder what led Basho to
            > > make the change.
            > >
            > > And Henderson says that the opening phrase haru nare ya is almost "Is it
            > > because of spring?"
            > >
            >
            > > >
            > > > haru nare ya na mo naki yama no usugasumi
            > > >
            > > > it is becoming spring -
            > > > on a mountain without a name
            > > > there is light mist
            > > >
            > > > Matsuo Basho
            > > > (Tr. Gabi Greve)
            > > >
            > > > Basho at Mount Kaguyama in Nara . . .
            > > >
            > > > More poems and reference is here
            > > > http://traveloguegokuraku.blogspot.jp/2012/06/kaguyama-nara.html
            > > >
            > > > Gabi
            > > >
            > >
            >
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