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Issa - sesame vinegar

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  • Greve Gabi
    goma su ... sesame vinegar made with with soy sauce, ground sesame and sugar and used as a kind of salad dressing.
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 17 12:52 AM
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      goma su ... "sesame vinegar" made with with soy sauce, ground sesame
      and sugar and used as a kind of salad dressing.
      http://washokufood.blogspot.jp/2008/07/su-vinegar.html


      But here it is the naming for normal sake rice wine, used as an euphemism for a
      "medicine to open up enlightenment"

      hannyatoo 若湯(はんにゃとう) is another such euphemism, used by priests and
      monks who are officially not allowed to drink.
      also Kara-cha 唐茶(からちゃ)   tea from China

      http://homepage3.nifty.com/funahashi/sonota/hoka48.html

      I check some more later

      Greetings from finally spring in Okayama
      Gabi


      > even beggars toast
      > with sesame sake...
      > first of spring
      >
      > konjiki mo gomazu kumuran kyoo no haru
      > 乞食も護摩酢酌むらん今日の春
      >
      > by Issa, 1795
      >
      > I originally thought that this was a scene at a Shinto shrine. I was misled
      > by the kanji with which Issa writes the word, goma; he uses the characters
      > that signify "holy fire" instead of those that mean "sesame seeds." Shinji
      > Ogawa set me straight. He adds that kumu, in this context, means "drink."
      > The ending -ran changes the verb into a conjecture ("they may or may not be
      > drinking"). In my re-translation, I use the verb "toast" in its simple,
      > present tense, but Issa more exactly is saying, "perhaps even beggars may
      > toast..." In English, the "perhaps" and "may" weaken the poem, so I've left
      > them out. The word kotsujiki is the old pronunciation of the word "beggar"
      > in this haiku. However, Sakuo Nakamura writes that "Issa usually didn't like
      > to use such a snobby word. He liked to use local accent to form his
      > characteristic haiku style." Sakuo grew up in the same language area as Issa
      > and feels confident that Issa would have pronounced the word, konjiki.
      >
      > To unsubscribe, visit http://cat.xula.edu/issa/
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