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Fwd: onomatopoetic word KON KON

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  • Greve Gabi
    going nuts in hailstones crashing down... a fox arare kon kon kon fureru kitsune kana by Issa, 1818 Shinji Ogawa notes that Issa is playing with the word
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1, 2008
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      going nuts in hailstones
      crashing down...
      a fox

      arare kon kon kon fureru kitsune kana

      by Issa, 1818
      Shinji Ogawa notes that Issa is playing with the word kon-kon in this haiku.
      It is both an adjective to depict the falling of hailstones and an onomatopoetic expression for a fox's voice.

      Tr. David Lanoue
      http://cat.xula.edu/issa/

      ................................................................


      More about the use of these words in haiku

      http://wkdhaikutopics.blogspot.com/2007/12/onomatopoetic-words.html




      Greetings from Japan
      GABI

      ....................................................................

      A friend asked

      a fox in English barks, and in a cartoon strip, you might say, whoof whoof
      and actually in my experience somewhat similar to the bark of a Chihuahua or
      miniature Poodle.

      How would "kon kon kon" go if literally translated?
       
       

      Any suggestions?
      GABI


      .
    • lbolenyc
      ... this haiku. ... whoof ... Chihuahua or ... Some info I found interesting: In Japanese, a fox s bark is written, Kitsu! Kitsu! This myth comes from a folk
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 6, 2008
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        --- In translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com, "Greve Gabi"
        <gokurakuatworldkigo@...> wrote:
        >
        > going nuts in hailstones
        > crashing down...
        > a fox
        >
        > arare kon kon kon fureru kitsune kana
        >
        > by Issa, 1818
        > Shinji Ogawa notes that Issa is playing with the word kon-kon in
        this haiku.
        >
        > It is both an adjective to depict the falling of hailstones and an
        > onomatopoetic expression for a fox's voice.
        >
        > Tr. David Lanoue
        > http://cat.xula.edu/issa/
        >
        > ................................................................
        >
        >
        > More about the use of these words in haiku
        >
        > http://wkdhaikutopics.blogspot.com/2007/12/onomatopoetic-words.html
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Greetings from Japan
        > GABI
        >
        > ....................................................................
        >
        > A friend asked
        >
        > a fox in English barks, and in a cartoon strip, you might say, whoof
        whoof
        > and actually in my experience somewhat similar to the bark of a
        Chihuahua or
        > miniature Poodle.
        >
        > *How would "kon kon kon" go if literally translated?*
        >
        >
        >
        > Any suggestions?
        > GABI


        Some info I found interesting:

        In Japanese, a fox's bark is written, "Kitsu! Kitsu!"

        This myth comes from a folk etymology of the word "kitsune," in which
        "kitsu" is onomatopoeia for a fox's bark and "ne" means "sound."
        Therefore, a fox is something which makes the noise "kitsu." Whether
        this derivation of the word is true or not, it's been a long, long
        time since Japanese foxes said "kitsu." Modern Japanese write the fox
        bark as "kon kon."

        http://academia.issendai.com/fox-misconceptions.shtml#bark


        In English, the official words for foxes are "bark" and "yelp".  In
        Japanese it's simply "naku" なく 鳴く and the onomatopoeia is kon-kon
        こんこん

        http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080604112441AAkjxob


        Kitsune soba: soba noodles with fried tofu on top


        The fox is an indigenous, if not notorious creature in Japan. It is
        believed to have the power to bewitch or possess the spirit of anyone
        who looks into its eyes. The fox is also honored by business owners as
        a patron spirit animal. Stone images of foxes can be seen guarding
        almost every temple, great or small, in Japan. The golden bean curd
        omelet is called ABURAGE (pronounced Ah-boo-rah-gay) and is often
        placed upon the altars of the temples as an offering to the gods who
        reside there. Foxes are fond of aburage and are said to steal into the
        temples under the cover of darkness to whisk away the tasty fare left
        there for them. And thus, this bewitching bit of lore gives Kitsune
        soba its name.

        http://www.thingsasian.com/stories-photos/1488


        My suggestion is to translate 'kon' as "yip:"

        'kon kon kon' = "yip yip yip"

        Larry
      • simple_sigh_man
        I have heard fox in the wild and when disturbed or stressed they have a uncanny yelp similar to a small dog, if memory serves. But, I have never heard
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 6, 2008
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          I have heard fox in the wild and when disturbed or stressed they have
          a uncanny "yelp" similar to a small dog, if memory serves. But, I
          have never heard Japanese foxes, which, may have different sounds.

          Foxes historically in Japan have a mythological association. A very
          popular shine in Japan is to the shinto diety fox. My first
          anchoring memory of Japan is at a fox shrine in Akita.

          Of course, I can readily picture the consternation of the fox
          subjected to the barage of hailstoes in Issa's haiku.

          Yet, the "kon kon kon" seems misplaced as the fox's yelp... perhaps
          it is the hailstones... konk, konk, konk!?... konkkonkkon...ko~n,
          ko~n, ko~n... well... I like to experiment with the words in
          languages that represent the sounds of animals.

          Ciao... chibi


          --- In translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com, "lbolenyc" <lbolenyc@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > --- In translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com, "Greve Gabi"
          > <gokurakuatworldkigo@> wrote:
          > >
          > > going nuts in hailstones
          > > crashing down...
          > > a fox
          > >
          > > arare kon kon kon fureru kitsune kana
          > >
          > > by Issa, 1818
          > > Shinji Ogawa notes that Issa is playing with the word kon-kon in
          > this haiku.
          > >
          > > It is both an adjective to depict the falling of hailstones and an
          > > onomatopoetic expression for a fox's voice.
          > >
          > > Tr. David Lanoue
          > > http://cat.xula.edu/issa/
          > >
          > > ................................................................
          > >
          > >
          > > More about the use of these words in haiku
          > >
          > > http://wkdhaikutopics.blogspot.com/2007/12/onomatopoetic-
          words.html
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Greetings from Japan
          > > GABI
          > >
          >
          > ....................................................................
          > >
          > > A friend asked
          > >
          > > a fox in English barks, and in a cartoon strip, you might say,
          whoof
          > whoof
          > > and actually in my experience somewhat similar to the bark of a
          > Chihuahua or
          > > miniature Poodle.
          > >
          > > *How would "kon kon kon" go if literally translated?*
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Any suggestions?
          > > GABI
          >
          >
          > Some info I found interesting:
          >
          > In Japanese, a fox's bark is written, "Kitsu! Kitsu!"
          >
          > This myth comes from a folk etymology of the word "kitsune," in
          which
          > "kitsu" is onomatopoeia for a fox's bark and "ne" means "sound."
          > Therefore, a fox is something which makes the noise "kitsu." Whether
          > this derivation of the word is true or not, it's been a long, long
          > time since Japanese foxes said "kitsu." Modern Japanese write the
          fox
          > bark as "kon kon."
          >
          > http://academia.issendai.com/fox-misconceptions.shtml#bark
          >
          >
          > In English, the official words for foxes are "bark"
          and "yelp".  In
          > Japanese it's simply "naku"
          なく 鳴く and the onomatopoeia is kon-
          kon
          > こんこん
          >
          > http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080604112441AAkjxob
          >
          >
          > Kitsune soba: soba noodles with fried tofu on top
          >
          >
          > The fox is an indigenous, if not notorious creature in Japan. It is
          > believed to have the power to bewitch or possess the spirit of
          anyone
          > who looks into its eyes. The fox is also honored by business owners
          as
          > a patron spirit animal. Stone images of foxes can be seen guarding
          > almost every temple, great or small, in Japan. The golden bean curd
          > omelet is called ABURAGE (pronounced Ah-boo-rah-gay) and is often
          > placed upon the altars of the temples as an offering to the gods who
          > reside there. Foxes are fond of aburage and are said to steal into
          the
          > temples under the cover of darkness to whisk away the tasty fare
          left
          > there for them. And thus, this bewitching bit of lore gives Kitsune
          > soba its name.
          >
          > http://www.thingsasian.com/stories-photos/1488
          >
          >
          > My suggestion is to translate 'kon' as "yip:"
          >
          > 'kon kon kon' = "yip yip yip"
          >
          > Larry
          >
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