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Re: Ichihara Tayo-Jo

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  • lbolenyc
    ... Gabi san, This is great! When I come across someone s death poem, I put it on a slip of paper and stick it between pages in the appropriate place in Yoel
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 7, 2007
      --- In translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com, "Greve Gabi"
      <gokurakuatworldkigo@...> wrote:
      >
      > Here is her last haiku
      >
      > owari ni yuku michi wa izuku zo hana no kumo
      >
      > where is it,
      > this final road ?
      > clouds of cherry blossoms
      >
      > Tr. Gabi Greve
      > http://wkdhaikutopics.blogspot.com/2007/03/ichihara-tayo-jo.html
      >
      >
      >
      > Japanese sources quote her birth year as 1766.


      Gabi san,

      This is great! When I come across someone's death poem, I put it on a
      slip of paper and stick it between pages in the appropriate place in
      Yoel Hoffman's "Japanese Death Poems." This is a welcome addition,
      not that I'm happy that Tayo-jo died!

      For what it's worth, here is some of Blyth's entry on Tayo-jo in
      his "History of Haiku: Vol. Two" (I'm sorry I can't indicate the
      kanji for names):

      "Tayo-jo, 1772-1865, was the wife of a certain Muranaga and learned
      haikai at first from Michihiko, then from Otsuni. She went to Edo in
      1823."

      Blyth translates these haiku of hers:

      Yuku mo kuru mo mina harukaze no tsutsumi kana

      People coming, people going,
      It is all the spring wind
      Along the embankment.

      trans. Blyth


      Ikisugite ware mo samui zo fuyu no hae

      Living too long,
      I too am cold,
      O winter fly!

      trans. Blyth

      Blyth says about this haiku: "A verse which sounds like her death-
      poem; she died at the age of ninety three."


      Sorezore ni na mo arige nari moyuru kusa

      Each must have its name,
      The green-burning
      Grasses.

      trans. Blyth


      Chinchooge yoru mo kakurenu nioi kana

      The 'chinchooge'
      Cannot be hid, even at night,--
      The fragrance!

      trans. Blyth

      Blyth comments: "The 'chinchooge' is a flowering bush with an
      extremely strong, sweet smell."


      Zen-doki wo oboete kuru ya suzume no ko

      Here come the young sparrows!
      They seem to have learned
      When meal-time is.

      trans. Blyth

      Stephen Addiss, in "A Haiku Menagerie: Living Creatures in Poems and
      Prints," translates this haiku as:

      They have learned
      to visit at mealtimes--
      baby sparrows

      trans. Addiss

      Addiss writes of Tayo-jo:

      "Tayo (1776-1865) A haiku pupil of doctor and poet Michihiko (1757-
      1819), Tayo moved to Edo in 1823, where she lived as a haiku master
      until the age of ninety. Her two sons also became good haiku poets."


      Kakururumo subayaki kiji ya kusa no kaze

      A pheasant
      Has rushed into cover?
      Wind in the grasses.

      trans. Blyth


      It is after the entry on Tayo-jo that Blyth writes:

      "We come now to the lowest point in the history of haiku, the period
      between Issa and Shiki. Shiki was born in 1856, and Issa died in
      1827, so this time is about the fifty years between 1827 and 1877.
      [etc.]"


      Larry
    • Greve Gabi
      Thanks a lot, Larry san, seems Blyth got the date of her birth wrong. In Japanese it is Anei 5, 1776. Now we have a fine collection of her haiku. I hope Hugh
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 7, 2007
        Thanks a lot, Larry san,

        seems Blyth got the date of her birth wrong.
        In Japanese it is Anei 5, 1776.

        Now we have a fine collection of her haiku. I hope Hugh can add some more !
        http://wkdhaikutopics.blogspot.com/2007/03/ichihara-tayo-jo.html


        I like the translation of .. suzume no ko

        Here come the young sparrows!



        Gabi

        > >
        > > Here is her last haiku
        > >
        > > owari ni yuku michi wa izuku zo hana no kumo
        > >
        > > where is it,
        > > this final road ?
        > > clouds of cherry blossoms
        > >
        > > Tr. Gabi Greve
        > > http://wkdhaikutopics.blogspot.com/2007/03/ichihara-tayo-jo.html
        >
        > Gabi san,
        >
        > For what it's worth, here is some of Blyth's entry on Tayo-jo in
        > his "History of Haiku: Vol. Two" (I'm sorry I can't indicate the
        > kanji for names):
        >
        > "Tayo-jo, 1772-1865, was the wife of a certain Muranaga and learned
        > haikai at first from Michihiko, then from Otsuni. She went to Edo in
        > 1823."
        >
        > Blyth translates these haiku of hers:
        >
        > Yuku mo kuru mo mina harukaze no tsutsumi kana
        >
        > People coming, people going,
        > It is all the spring wind
        > Along the embankment.
        >
        > trans. Blyth
        >
        >
        > Ikisugite ware mo samui zo fuyu no hae
        >
        > Living too long,
        > I too am cold,
        > O winter fly!
        >
        > trans. Blyth
        >
        > Blyth says about this haiku: "A verse which sounds like her death-
        > poem; she died at the age of ninety three."
        >
        >
        > Sorezore ni na mo arige nari moyuru kusa
        >
        > Each must have its name,
        > The green-burning
        > Grasses.
        >
        > trans. Blyth
        >
        >
        > Chinchooge yoru mo kakurenu nioi kana
        >
        > The 'chinchooge'
        > Cannot be hid, even at night,--
        > The fragrance!
        >
        > trans. Blyth
        >
        > Blyth comments: "The 'chinchooge' is a flowering bush with an
        > extremely strong, sweet smell."
        >
        >
        > Zen-doki wo oboete kuru ya suzume no ko
        >
        > Here come the young sparrows!
        > They seem to have learned
        > When meal-time is.
        >
        > trans. Blyth
        >
        > Stephen Addiss, in "A Haiku Menagerie: Living Creatures in Poems and
        > Prints," translates this haiku as:
        >
        > They have learned
        > to visit at mealtimes--
        > baby sparrows
        >
        > trans. Addiss
        >
        > Addiss writes of Tayo-jo:
        >
        > "Tayo (1776-1865) A haiku pupil of doctor and poet Michihiko (1757-
        > 1819), Tayo moved to Edo in 1823, where she lived as a haiku master
        > until the age of ninety. Her two sons also became good haiku poets."
        >
        >
        > Kakururumo subayaki kiji ya kusa no kaze
        >
        > A pheasant
        > Has rushed into cover?
        > Wind in the grasses.
        >
        > trans. Blyth
        >
        >
        > It is after the entry on Tayo-jo that Blyth writes:
        >
        > "We come now to the lowest point in the history of haiku, the period
        > between Issa and Shiki. Shiki was born in 1856, and Issa died in
        > 1827, so this time is about the fifty years between 1827 and 1877.
        > [etc.]"
        >
        >
        > Larry
        >


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