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RE: [Translating Haiku] Issa Haiku : sand in the hair ... koosa ? < Kemari sakuo>

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  • Sakuo Nakamura
    Gabi san, your opinion on yellow sand from Gobi is very interest. I think it is very real answer. [kasumu hi ya, misty day--] sound very easy mood. [yellow
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 1, 2007
      Gabi san, your opinion on yellow sand from Gobi is very interest.
      I think it is very real answer.
      [kasumu hi ya, misty day--] sound very easy mood.
      [yellow sand] is far from romantic mood.

      I suppose that the sand on the great courtier comes from playing Kemari,蹴鞠
      that was played by court nobles in the Nara and Heian period.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kemari


      sakuo.



      -----Original Message-----
      From: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com [mailto:translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.
      com] On Behalf Of Greve Gabi
      Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 2:49 PM
      To: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com; Happy Haiku Yahoo
      Subject: [Translating Haiku] Issa Haiku : sand in the hair ... koosa ?

      misty day--
      the great courtier
      with sand in his hair

      kasumu hi ya oomiyabito no kami no suna

      by Issa, 1808

      Why does the courtier have sand in his hair? Is this an idiom? A beach
      scene?
      Tr. David Lanoue
      http://cat.xula.edu/issa/ <http://cat.xula.edu/issa/>

      ................................................

      In our present day Japan, it could well be the yellow sand of the Gobi
      desert, which blows in Kyoto quite often in spring. I remember walking in
      Kyoto in March on such a day, with very limited visibility, and after a
      very short while, sand was everywhere, even in our mouths.

      But this is the Heian period nobleman, which Issa is alluding to. I wonder
      if they had koosa already !

      Do you have any ideas about this sand in the hair ?

      GABI

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Greve Gabi
      Hi Sakuo san, kemari, that is an interesting thought too. Here is our bit with the haiku connection.
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2007
        Hi Sakuo san,
        kemari, that is an interesting thought too.
        Here is our bit with the haiku connection.
        http://worldkigo2005.blogspot.com/2005/06/first-kick-ball-game.html

        kasumi, misty, is always the feeling in my valley when the yellow sand is
        blowing. It is not possible to see the other side of the valley sometimes
        and below us, all is in yellow haze.

        GABI




        > Gabi san, your opinion on yellow sand from Gobi is very interest.
        > I think it is very real answer.
        > [kasumu hi ya, misty day--] sound very easy mood.
        > [yellow sand] is far from romantic mood.
        >
        > I suppose that the sand on the great courtier comes from playing Kemari,蹴鞠
        > that was played by court nobles in the Nara and Heian period.
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kemari
        >
        >
        > sakuo.
        >
        >
        >
        > misty day--
        > the great courtier
        > with sand in his hair
        >
        > kasumu hi ya oomiyabito no kami no suna
        >
        > by Issa, 1808
        >
        > Why does the courtier have sand in his hair? Is this an idiom? A beach
        > scene?
        > Tr. David Lanoue
        > http://cat.xula.edu/issa/ <http://cat.xula.edu/issa/>
        >
        > ................................................
        >
        > In our present day Japan, it could well be the yellow sand of the Gobi
        > desert, which blows in Kyoto quite often in spring. I remember walking in
        > Kyoto in March on such a day, with very limited visibility, and after a
        > very short while, sand was everywhere, even in our mouths.
        >
        > But this is the Heian period nobleman, which Issa is alluding to. I wonder
        > if they had koosa already !
        >
        > Do you have any ideas about this sand in the hair ?
        >
        > GABI
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • lbolenyc
        Sakuo san, Thank you for mentioning Kemari. Very interesting! There is a game of this type which was invented in the U.S. in the 1970s, called Hacky Sack,
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 1, 2007
          Sakuo san,

          Thank you for mentioning Kemari. Very interesting! There is a game of
          this type which was "invented" in the U.S. in the 1970s, called Hacky
          Sack, the name being derived from one of the "inventors" telling the
          other one that he was "hackin' the sack," to describe keeping a small
          ball (more like a small beanbag, hence "sack") in the air with his
          feet and knees.

          Larry

          > Gabi san, your opinion on yellow sand from Gobi is very interest.
          > I think it is very real answer.
          > [kasumu hi ya, misty day--] sound very easy mood.
          > [yellow sand] is far from romantic mood.
          >
          > I suppose that the sand on the great courtier comes from playing
          Kemari,½³µÇ
          > that was played by court nobles in the Nara and Heian period.
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kemari
          >
          >
          > sakuo.
          >
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.
          > com] On Behalf Of Greve Gabi
          > Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 2:49 PM
          > To: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com; Happy Haiku Yahoo
          > Subject: [Translating Haiku] Issa Haiku : sand in the hair ...
          koosa ?
          >
          > misty day--
          > the great courtier
          > with sand in his hair
          >
          > kasumu hi ya oomiyabito no kami no suna
          >
          > by Issa, 1808
          >
          > Why does the courtier have sand in his hair? Is this an idiom? A
          beach
          > scene?
          > Tr. David Lanoue
          > http://cat.xula.edu/issa/ <http://cat.xula.edu/issa/>
          >
          > ................................................
          >
          > In our present day Japan, it could well be the yellow sand of the
          Gobi
          > desert, which blows in Kyoto quite often in spring. I remember
          walking in
          > Kyoto in March on such a day, with very limited visibility, and
          after a
          > very short while, sand was everywhere, even in our mouths.
          >
          > But this is the Heian period nobleman, which Issa is alluding to. I
          wonder
          > if they had koosa already !
          >
          > Do you have any ideas about this sand in the hair ?
          >
          > GABI
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Sakuo Nakamura
          Thank you Larry san for your interest information on Hacky Sack. More over your mention about Japan Probe is very precious for me. It is helpful with it s
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 1, 2007
            Thank you Larry san for your interest information on Hacky Sack.
            More over your mention about Japan Probe is very precious for me.
            It is helpful with it's abundant contents and it's visually with YouTube.

            sakuo.

            -----Original Message-----
            From: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of lbolenyc
            Sent: Saturday, June 02, 2007 1:20 AM
            To: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Translating Haiku] Issa Haiku : sand in the hair ... koosa ? <
            Kemari sakuo>

            Sakuo san,

            Thank you for mentioning Kemari. Very interesting! There is a game of
            this type which was "invented" in the U.S. in the 1970s, called Hacky
            Sack, the name being derived from one of the "inventors" telling the
            other one that he was "hackin' the sack," to describe keeping a small
            ball (more like a small beanbag, hence "sack") in the air with his
            feet and knees.

            Larry

            > Gabi san, your opinion on yellow sand from Gobi is very interest.
            > I think it is very real answer.
            > [kasumu hi ya, misty day--] sound very easy mood.
            > [yellow sand] is far from romantic mood.
            >
            > I suppose that the sand on the great courtier comes from playing
            Kemari,½³µÇ
            > that was played by court nobles in the Nara and Heian period.
            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kemari <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kemari>
            >
            >
            > sakuo.
            >
            >
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:translatinghaiku%40yahoogroups.com>
            [mailto:translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.
            > com] On Behalf Of Greve Gabi
            > Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 2:49 PM
            > To: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:translatinghaiku%40yahoogroups.com> ; Happy Haiku Yahoo
            > Subject: [Translating Haiku] Issa Haiku : sand in the hair ...
            koosa ?
            >
            > misty day--
            > the great courtier
            > with sand in his hair
            >
            > kasumu hi ya oomiyabito no kami no suna
            >
            > by Issa, 1808
            >
            > Why does the courtier have sand in his hair? Is this an idiom? A
            beach
            > scene?
            > Tr. David Lanoue
            > http://cat.xula.edu/issa/ <http://cat.xula.edu/issa/>
            <http://cat.xula.edu/issa/ <http://cat.xula.edu/issa/> >
            >
            > ................................................
            >
            > In our present day Japan, it could well be the yellow sand of the
            Gobi
            > desert, which blows in Kyoto quite often in spring. I remember
            walking in
            > Kyoto in March on such a day, with very limited visibility, and
            after a
            > very short while, sand was everywhere, even in our mouths.
            >
            > But this is the Heian period nobleman, which Issa is alluding to. I
            wonder
            > if they had koosa already !
            >
            > Do you have any ideas about this sand in the hair ?
            >
            > GABI
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Sakuo Nakamura
            Thank you, Gabi san for your information about Kemari. I found at your site, the picture of Kemari played by the courtiers. Your site is always helpful for me.
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 1, 2007
              Thank you, Gabi san for your information about Kemari.
              I found at your site, the picture of Kemari played by the courtiers.
              Your site is always helpful for me.

              sakuo.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com [mailto:translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.
              com] On Behalf Of Greve Gabi
              Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 5:22 PM
              To: translatinghaiku@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Translating Haiku] Issa Haiku : sand in the hair ... koosa ? <
              Kemari sakuo>

              Hi Sakuo san,
              kemari, that is an interesting thought too.
              Here is our bit with the haiku connection.
              http://worldkigo2005.blogspot.com/2005/06/first-kick-ball-game.html
              <http://worldkigo2005.blogspot.com/2005/06/first-kick-ball-game.html>

              kasumi, misty, is always the feeling in my valley when the yellow sand is
              blowing. It is not possible to see the other side of the valley sometimes
              and below us, all is in yellow haze.

              GABI

              > Gabi san, your opinion on yellow sand from Gobi is very interest.
              > I think it is very real answer.
              > [kasumu hi ya, misty day--] sound very easy mood.
              > [yellow sand] is far from romantic mood.
              >
              > I suppose that the sand on the great courtier comes from playing Kemari,蹴

              > that was played by court nobles in the Nara and Heian period.
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kemari <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kemari>
              >
              >
              > sakuo.
              >
              >
              >
              > misty day--
              > the great courtier
              > with sand in his hair
              >
              > kasumu hi ya oomiyabito no kami no suna
              >
              > by Issa, 1808
              >
              > Why does the courtier have sand in his hair? Is this an idiom? A beach
              > scene?
              > Tr. David Lanoue
              > http://cat.xula.edu/issa/ <http://cat.xula.edu/issa/>
              <http://cat.xula.edu/issa/ <http://cat.xula.edu/issa/> >
              >
              > ................................................
              >
              > In our present day Japan, it could well be the yellow sand of the Gobi
              > desert, which blows in Kyoto quite often in spring. I remember walking in
              > Kyoto in March on such a day, with very limited visibility, and after a
              > very short while, sand was everywhere, even in our mouths.
              >
              > But this is the Heian period nobleman, which Issa is alluding to. I wonder
              > if they had koosa already !
              >
              > Do you have any ideas about this sand in the hair ?
              >
              > GABI
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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