Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [tracker2] OTUSB UI-VIEW32 GPS Pass Through? Serial Data Monitoring?

Expand Messages
  • Fred Hillhouse
    Hi Chris, To only monitor data, set your COM port to 9600, 8, N, 1. I forget the mode but don t use KISS. Or you use the USB port and I don t remember what I
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 28, 2012
      Hi Chris,
       
       
      To only monitor data, set your COM port to 9600, 8, N, 1. I forget the mode but don't use KISS. Or you use the USB port and I don't remember what I did there.  I think I had to set the RX level on the OTUSB as well to optimize RX. You will also need to set the VX-6 volume to the same level each time you use it.
       
      To actually use the TNC for TX and RX:
       
      The TNC will beacon on its own as a simple tracker. But if you want to see the world around you, you will need to connect a PC.
       
      I connect via serial (9600,8N,1) and use KISS on Port A.
       
      I connect a GPS to Port B. It does not interleave NMEA with regular data. I built a splitter to split port A and B to separate connectors. In addition, I added a GPS splitter so two devices can receive the GPS data. My GPS can feed my TNC and PC. Currently, the GPS data does not go to my TNC but the ability is always there when I need it.
       
      On the KISS port, I hang a PC (desktop, netbook, tablet, phone -  yes, each of those have been connected at different times.
       
      On the PC, I run APRSISCE/32. Check it out! You may be pleasantly surprised.
       
      The OTUSB can run its own profile while connected to to a PC. The PC can also control it. This means that if you do not have a PC connected, it will beacon per your settings and when you do connect a PC, it will still beacon and the PC can TX/RX through it.
       
      I don't use an HT because the output level of the radio affects receive performance. I prefer radios with a Mini-DIN connector or one that is easily accessed internally. Once the levels are set, there is no way to just bump them. And they are pretty cheap.
       
       
      Best regards,
      Fred, N7FMH
       
       


      From: tracker2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tracker2@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Chris Meyer
      Sent: Friday, December 28, 2012 13:56
      To: tracker2@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [tracker2] OTUSB UI-VIEW32 GPS Pass Through? Serial Data Monitoring?

       

      I looked around briefly and couldn't find more information to answer these
      questions, but if there's a tutorial beyond what's in the back of the OTUSB
      manual please point me to it :-)

      Is there a way to pass GPS data from a GPS receiver plugged into the OTUSB
      to a computer running UI-VIEW32? I tried setting the GPS to the same COM
      port as the OTUSB in KISS mode but looking on the terminal and the terminal
      for the GPS receiver it's clear that no data.

      How do I monitor data coming from the OTUSB? I've attempted opening a
      basic serial terminal at 4800 but I don't see anything on boot/while it's
      running at all. I can hear APRS traffic on the radio but haven't
      successfully decoded any packets so it's challenging to figure out where to
      start debugging. I'm somewhat familiar with the APRS software as I was
      successfully using my sound card and radio to decode packets previously,
      just trying to figure out if I have software/hardware/or audio level issues
      with the radio. I'm using a VX-6R, currently don't have the 'HI' jumper
      set for audio levels on the OTUSB.

      To give you an idea of what I'm trying to accomplish, that might help point
      me in the correct direction - we're flying high altitude balloons and using
      APRS to beacon position data while the balloon is in the air and it works
      great (
      http://aprs.fi/#!mt=roadmap&z=11&call=a%2FKC9LAU-11&timerange=20000&tail=20000).
      However, when the balloon lands we lose signal as there aren't any local
      stations close enough to hear the 200mW beacon, so I want to take a laptop,
      the VX-6r radio, and the OTUSB and wander around in a field where we came
      down near until I can pick up the local signals and have it tell us its
      location. (Yes, we could use direction finding equipment to hunt it as
      well, but we're going to start with this as we have a lot more skill in
      this area). Ideally I would have a map of the local area cached (which
      there are plenty of instructions on), the GPS hooked to the OTUSB would
      plot our location on the map as I'm wandering around, and it would be able
      to decode data packets from our transmitter (as well as whatever else is
      around) and plot the reported coordinates on the map. Bonus feature would
      be transmitting our own location (the searchers) out to anyone else with a
      station that could get it online but I'm a lot more concerned with finding
      our weak signal first.

      Thoughts?

      Thank you,

      Chris

    • Scott Miller
      I know a couple of APRS clients will take NMEA in some sort of encapsulation, but I haven t had time to run down the details. If someone wants to provide me
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 28, 2012
        I know a couple of APRS clients will take NMEA in some sort of
        encapsulation, but I haven't had time to run down the details. If
        someone wants to provide me with the specs, I'll see what I can do.
        It'll probably only make it into the T3, though - the OTUSB and T2 don't
        have much code space to spare these days.

        Scott

        On 12/28/2012 11:30 AM, Fred Hillhouse wrote:
        > Hi Chris,
        > To only monitor data, set your COM port to 9600, 8, N, 1. I forget the
        > mode but don't use KISS. Or you use the USB port and I don't remember
        > what I did there. I think I had to set the RX level on the OTUSB as
        > well to optimize RX. You will also need to set the VX-6 volume to the
        > same level each time you use it.
        > To actually use the TNC for TX and RX:
        > The TNC will beacon on its own as a simple tracker. But if you want to
        > see the world around you, you will need to connect a PC.
        > I connect via serial (9600,8N,1) and use KISS on Port A.
        > I connect a GPS to Port B. It does not interleave NMEA with regular
        > data. I built a splitter to split port A and B to separate connectors.
        > In addition, I added a GPS splitter so two devices can receive the GPS
        > data. My GPS can feed my TNC and PC. Currently, the GPS data does not go
        > to my TNC but the ability is always there when I need it.
        > On the KISS port, I hang a PC (desktop, netbook, tablet, phone - yes,
        > each of those have been connected at different times.
        > On the PC, I run APRSISCE/32. Check it out! You may be pleasantly surprised.
        > http://aprsisce.wikidot.com
        > The OTUSB can run its own profile while connected to to a PC. The PC can
        > also control it. This means that if you do not have a PC connected, it
        > will beacon per your settings and when you do connect a PC, it will
        > still beacon and the PC can TX/RX through it.
        > I don't use an HT because the output level of the radio affects receive
        > performance. I prefer radios with a Mini-DIN connector or one that is
        > easily accessed internally. Once the levels are set, there is no way to
        > just bump them. And they are pretty cheap.
        > Best regards,
        > Fred, N7FMH
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > *From:* tracker2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tracker2@yahoogroups.com]
        > *On Behalf Of *Chris Meyer
        > *Sent:* Friday, December 28, 2012 13:56
        > *To:* tracker2@yahoogroups.com
        > *Subject:* [tracker2] OTUSB UI-VIEW32 GPS Pass Through? Serial Data
        > Monitoring?
        >
        > I looked around briefly and couldn't find more information to answer
        > these
        > questions, but if there's a tutorial beyond what's in the back of
        > the OTUSB
        > manual please point me to it :-)
        >
        > Is there a way to pass GPS data from a GPS receiver plugged into the
        > OTUSB
        > to a computer running UI-VIEW32? I tried setting the GPS to the same COM
        > port as the OTUSB in KISS mode but looking on the terminal and the
        > terminal
        > for the GPS receiver it's clear that no data.
        >
        > How do I monitor data coming from the OTUSB? I've attempted opening a
        > basic serial terminal at 4800 but I don't see anything on boot/while
        > it's
        > running at all. I can hear APRS traffic on the radio but haven't
        > successfully decoded any packets so it's challenging to figure out
        > where to
        > start debugging. I'm somewhat familiar with the APRS software as I was
        > successfully using my sound card and radio to decode packets previously,
        > just trying to figure out if I have software/hardware/or audio level
        > issues
        > with the radio. I'm using a VX-6R, currently don't have the 'HI' jumper
        > set for audio levels on the OTUSB.
        >
        > To give you an idea of what I'm trying to accomplish, that might
        > help point
        > me in the correct direction - we're flying high altitude balloons
        > and using
        > APRS to beacon position data while the balloon is in the air and it
        > works
        > great (
        > http://aprs.fi/#!mt=roadmap&z=11&call=a%2FKC9LAU-11&timerange=20000&tail=20000).
        > However, when the balloon lands we lose signal as there aren't any local
        > stations close enough to hear the 200mW beacon, so I want to take a
        > laptop,
        > the VX-6r radio, and the OTUSB and wander around in a field where we
        > came
        > down near until I can pick up the local signals and have it tell us its
        > location. (Yes, we could use direction finding equipment to hunt it as
        > well, but we're going to start with this as we have a lot more skill in
        > this area). Ideally I would have a map of the local area cached (which
        > there are plenty of instructions on), the GPS hooked to the OTUSB would
        > plot our location on the map as I'm wandering around, and it would
        > be able
        > to decode data packets from our transmitter (as well as whatever else is
        > around) and plot the reported coordinates on the map. Bonus feature
        > would
        > be transmitting our own location (the searchers) out to anyone else
        > with a
        > station that could get it online but I'm a lot more concerned with
        > finding
        > our weak signal first.
        >
        > Thoughts?
        >
        > Thank you,
        >
        > Chris
        >
        >
      • Lynn W. Deffenbaugh (Mr)
        For a KISS port passthrough, simply take the entire NMEA sentence (configurable as to which one if you like or just the pair that have lat/lon speed and
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 28, 2012
          For a KISS port passthrough, simply take the entire NMEA sentence
          (configurable as to which one if you like or just the pair that have
          lat/lon speed and altitude) including the checksum and <CR><LF> and put
          it inside a KISS wrapper <CO><00>$GPxxx,n,,n,n,n,n,n,n,n*cs<CR><LF><CO>
          and interleave it with all of the other APRS packets coming through in
          KISS mode.

          Optionally, you can put an alternate port number in bits 4,5,6 of the
          command byte per the MKISS protocol. The TinyTrak4 supports this. It
          may or may not make the interleave stream less confusing to some KISS
          clients.

          Oh, and since you know the NMEA strings are printable ASCII, you don't
          need to worry about any of the KISS escape processing. There won't be
          any escape-necessary characters in a check-sum-passing NMEA sentence.

          For a TEXT port, just put the NMEA sentences in between the
          TNC2-formatted APRS packets, again with the checksum and <CR><LF>.

          Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32

          On 12/28/2012 2:33 PM, Scott Miller wrote:
          > I know a couple of APRS clients will take NMEA in some sort of
          > encapsulation, but I haven't had time to run down the details. If
          > someone wants to provide me with the specs, I'll see what I can do.
          > It'll probably only make it into the T3, though - the OTUSB and T2 don't
          > have much code space to spare these days.
          >
          > Scott
          >
          > On 12/28/2012 11:30 AM, Fred Hillhouse wrote:
          >> Hi Chris,
          >> To only monitor data, set your COM port to 9600, 8, N, 1. I forget the
          >> mode but don't use KISS. Or you use the USB port and I don't remember
          >> what I did there. I think I had to set the RX level on the OTUSB as
          >> well to optimize RX. You will also need to set the VX-6 volume to the
          >> same level each time you use it.
          >> To actually use the TNC for TX and RX:
          >> The TNC will beacon on its own as a simple tracker. But if you want to
          >> see the world around you, you will need to connect a PC.
          >> I connect via serial (9600,8N,1) and use KISS on Port A.
          >> I connect a GPS to Port B. It does not interleave NMEA with regular
          >> data. I built a splitter to split port A and B to separate connectors.
          >> In addition, I added a GPS splitter so two devices can receive the GPS
          >> data. My GPS can feed my TNC and PC. Currently, the GPS data does not go
          >> to my TNC but the ability is always there when I need it.
          >> On the KISS port, I hang a PC (desktop, netbook, tablet, phone - yes,
          >> each of those have been connected at different times.
          >> On the PC, I run APRSISCE/32. Check it out! You may be pleasantly surprised.
          >> http://aprsisce.wikidot.com
          >> The OTUSB can run its own profile while connected to to a PC. The PC can
          >> also control it. This means that if you do not have a PC connected, it
          >> will beacon per your settings and when you do connect a PC, it will
          >> still beacon and the PC can TX/RX through it.
          >> I don't use an HT because the output level of the radio affects receive
          >> performance. I prefer radios with a Mini-DIN connector or one that is
          >> easily accessed internally. Once the levels are set, there is no way to
          >> just bump them. And they are pretty cheap.
          >> Best regards,
          >> Fred, N7FMH
          >>
          >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >> *From:* tracker2@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tracker2@yahoogroups.com]
          >> *On Behalf Of *Chris Meyer
          >> *Sent:* Friday, December 28, 2012 13:56
          >> *To:* tracker2@yahoogroups.com
          >> *Subject:* [tracker2] OTUSB UI-VIEW32 GPS Pass Through? Serial Data
          >> Monitoring?
          >>
          >> I looked around briefly and couldn't find more information to answer
          >> these
          >> questions, but if there's a tutorial beyond what's in the back of
          >> the OTUSB
          >> manual please point me to it :-)
          >>
          >> Is there a way to pass GPS data from a GPS receiver plugged into the
          >> OTUSB
          >> to a computer running UI-VIEW32? I tried setting the GPS to the same COM
          >> port as the OTUSB in KISS mode but looking on the terminal and the
          >> terminal
          >> for the GPS receiver it's clear that no data.
          >>
          >> How do I monitor data coming from the OTUSB? I've attempted opening a
          >> basic serial terminal at 4800 but I don't see anything on boot/while
          >> it's
          >> running at all. I can hear APRS traffic on the radio but haven't
          >> successfully decoded any packets so it's challenging to figure out
          >> where to
          >> start debugging. I'm somewhat familiar with the APRS software as I was
          >> successfully using my sound card and radio to decode packets previously,
          >> just trying to figure out if I have software/hardware/or audio level
          >> issues
          >> with the radio. I'm using a VX-6R, currently don't have the 'HI' jumper
          >> set for audio levels on the OTUSB.
          >>
          >> To give you an idea of what I'm trying to accomplish, that might
          >> help point
          >> me in the correct direction - we're flying high altitude balloons
          >> and using
          >> APRS to beacon position data while the balloon is in the air and it
          >> works
          >> great (
          >> http://aprs.fi/#!mt=roadmap&z=11&call=a%2FKC9LAU-11&timerange=20000&tail=20000).
          >> However, when the balloon lands we lose signal as there aren't any local
          >> stations close enough to hear the 200mW beacon, so I want to take a
          >> laptop,
          >> the VX-6r radio, and the OTUSB and wander around in a field where we
          >> came
          >> down near until I can pick up the local signals and have it tell us its
          >> location. (Yes, we could use direction finding equipment to hunt it as
          >> well, but we're going to start with this as we have a lot more skill in
          >> this area). Ideally I would have a map of the local area cached (which
          >> there are plenty of instructions on), the GPS hooked to the OTUSB would
          >> plot our location on the map as I'm wandering around, and it would
          >> be able
          >> to decode data packets from our transmitter (as well as whatever else is
          >> around) and plot the reported coordinates on the map. Bonus feature
          >> would
          >> be transmitting our own location (the searchers) out to anyone else
          >> with a
          >> station that could get it online but I'm a lot more concerned with
          >> finding
          >> our weak signal first.
          >>
          >> Thoughts?
          >>
          >> Thank you,
          >>
          >> Chris
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • James Ewen
          ... As others have stated... nope, not yet. (There s a bit of push for Scott, making it sound like he s working on a GPS pass through!) ... Are you up for a
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 28, 2012
            On Fri, Dec 28, 2012 at 11:56 AM, Chris Meyer <waterppk@...> wrote:

            > Is there a way to pass GPS data from a GPS receiver plugged into the OTUSB
            > to a computer running UI-VIEW32?

            As others have stated... nope, not yet. (There's a bit of push for
            Scott, making it sound like he's working on a GPS pass through!)

            > To give you an idea of what I'm trying to accomplish, that might help point
            > me in the correct direction - we're flying high altitude balloons and using
            > APRS to beacon position data while the balloon is in the air and it works
            > great
            > However, when the balloon lands we lose signal as there aren't any local
            > stations close enough to hear the 200mW beacon, so I want to take a laptop,
            > the VX-6r radio, and the OTUSB and wander around in a field where we came
            > down near until I can pick up the local signals and have it tell us its
            > location.

            Are you up for a little advice from someone who's been there? I
            started chasing balloons in 2000, and tried doing just a small bit of
            what you are suggesting. I tried using my Kenwood TH-D7a(g) tethered
            to my Garmin GPS II+. This gave me a nice portable unit that I could
            carry with me. The D7 listened for packets, and forwarded them to the
            GPS II+ to be plotted. The GPS II+ would give me bearing and distance
            to the waypoint, and all that was required was to simply wander in the
            right direction until the distance dropped to zero.

            I never really liked the combo because I was using the GPS II+ to
            provide GPS data to my Kenwood TM-D700 in my vehicle, which was my
            primary tracking means. I had UI-View tied into the D700 for a large
            mapping display. If I had dedicated the GPS II+ to the D7, and made a
            carrier that put both into a single package with no wires hanging
            around, it probably would have been okay. As it was, I would try
            walking around with the HT in one hand and the GPS in the other with
            the interface cable dangling between. Not very convenient.

            I hear you saying you're planning on dragging an HT, an OT-USB, a GPS,
            and a laptop around while searching for the balloon. I'm going to go
            out on a limb here and tell you that you're going to tire of that in a
            hurry.

            The setup will work nicely for in a vehicle and tracking that way,
            although a mobile radio would probably be better.

            For on foot work however, a dedicated APRS HT is much better. When the
            Kenwood TH-D72 came out, I knew I needed one. The built in GPS makes
            for a single bit of gear to carry with you. You can capture packets
            from the balloon while wandering about, and the built in GPS will
            steer you to the payload. There are no maps, but balloons rarely land
            on a mapped road or other area. They usually end up in a field, bush,
            hillside, desert, valley or some other ugly place. You just need to
            get dragged to the right section of the aforementioned "feature".

            The Yaesu HT will also work, but be aware that you can't tie a
            computer into it for use with UI-View, or the much better APRSISCE/32
            APRS client.

            > Bonus feature would
            > be transmitting our own location (the searchers) out to anyone else with a
            > station that could get it online but I'm a lot more concerned with finding
            > our weak signal first.

            The above HTs would do the job...

            Simple is always better. The HTs may cost a bit, but they are much
            easier to use than all that gear you want to lash together and tote
            along.

            Our local University Physics department followed my advice and
            purchased a couple D72 for chasing their high altitude payloads. They
            tie the HTs into laptops for the mobile chase, and then disconnect and
            home in on foot with the HT alone.

            Having dedicated gear mounted in the vehicle is always easier to use
            than a jury rigged system. You inevitably get loose connections, or
            broken wires or other issues with "portable" systems. Use the OTUSB
            and radio as a permanent vehicle mount system, and tie the laptop into
            it as desired.

            Oh yeah, if you're serious about chasing balloon payloads, an airborne
            reconnaissance platform is the way to go. Flying over the landing area
            affords an easy detection of the final resting place. As you know, 200
            mW goes a long way given line of sight, so get airborne over the
            landing area to get a good LOS. I purchased a powered paraglider for
            reconnaissance... Others use Cessnas or other light aircraft.

            BTW, don't ever fly with WIDE1-1 in your path. At most use WIDE2-1,
            and only when down near the ground. We fly all flights with a no hop
            path as the i-gates hear the payload for hundreds of miles. As you
            already mentioned, the final payload resting point will need to be
            heard direct by the chase crews most of the time, so having the
            payload disrupting the APRS network for hundreds of miles for no
            reason is a waste of resources.

            For easy ground detection, fly on an alternate frequency (144.350 or
            144.990 or something else). Put up an i-gate listening on your chosen
            frequency, gating to the APRS-IS. If you have more APRS buddies that
            can put up an i-gate on the alternate frequency, then you get
            diversity receive. We normally run with a cellular wifi hotspot in the
            chase vehicle, so we can i-gate on the run as well. When your payload
            lands, and you get close, you'll be able to hear it on the dedicated
            frequency. No one else will be making noise there (your chase vehicles
            have all shut down beaconing, right?), so if you hear any bit of
            packet racket, that's your payload. You can use signal fade to
            determine when you are getting closer/further from the payload, even
            if you can't decode the signals. On 144.390, you'll hear the
            digipeaters, other mobiles, fixed stations, and all sorts of noise. It
            is very hard to differentiate your payload squawks from all the others
            out there.

            If you do have an airborne chase platform, you can go one step
            further. Have your payload on the alternate frequency ask for a hop
            via CHASE. On your airborne platform, have the radio on board (a
            TH-D72) configured to listen on the alternate frequency, and transmit
            on 144.390. Set the digipeater up to act upon the CHASE alias. When
            your airborne platform hears a packet from the payload, it will
            digipeat the signal over to the regular APRS-RF network. Your airborne
            platform will get a waypoint, and the chase vehicles can get the
            location via the airborne digipeater. Your chase vehicles will have to
            switch back to 144.390 if waiting for the airborne platform to hear
            the payload. Once they get a fix, they can switch back to listening on
            the chase frequency while homing in.

            If you have the D72 in the chase vehicle acting as a cross frequency
            digipeater all the time, you can leave your main rig on 144.390 for
            tracking, and when the HT hears the payload, it will digipeat the
            signal to 144.390 where your main system can hear the packet. The HT
            might miss the odd packet, so you will probably want a dedicated
            listening station on the alternate frequency.

            Hope that gives some food for thought.

            --
            James
            VE6SRV

            http://bear.sbszoo.com Balloon Experiments with Amateur Radio
          • qrv@kd4e.com
            Sounds as though a drone with onboard streaming video plus APRS and GPS are in order! ;-) ... -- Thanks! & 73, KD4E.com David Colburn nevils-station.com I
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 29, 2012
              Sounds as though a drone with onboard streaming video
              plus APRS and GPS are in order! ;-)

              > If you do have an airborne chase platform ...
              >
              > Hope that gives some food for thought.
              >
              > -- James VE6SRV


              --

              Thanks! & 73, KD4E.com
              David Colburn nevils-station.com
              I don't google I SEARCH! duckduckgo.com
              Network: groups.yahoo.com/group/qrv
              Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.