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t2-301 auto frequency change based upon lat/lon

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  • Eric Fort
    Could the t2-301 be scripted to change frequency using geofence parameters? might be a thought for the t3-301 as well. Thinking on something like a HIBAL
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 13, 2011
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      Could the t2-301 be scripted to change frequency using geofence parameters?  might be a thought for the t3-301 as well.  Thinking on something like a HIBAL payload may benefit from this by starting with the us aprs frequency and changing frequency when it enters another global region.  If not this is there possibly some means of alternating the frequency where every other packet gets transmitted  on alternating frequencies.  Thus the package becomes globally trackable.

      Eric
      AF6EP

    • Lynn W. Deffenbaugh (Mr)
      Not just frequency but path as well. Picture switching to 145.825 and a path of ARISS when you re over the Atlantic... Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 13, 2011
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        Not just frequency but path as well.  Picture switching to 145.825 and a path of ARISS when you're over the Atlantic...

        Lynn (D) - KJ4ERJ - Author of APRSISCE for Windows Mobile and Win32
        (with credit to G6UIM with whom I had this conversation earlier today)

        On 12/13/2011 9:09 PM, Eric Fort wrote: Could the t2-301 be scripted to change frequency using geofence parameters?  might be a thought for the t3-301 as well.  Thinking on something like a HIBAL payload may benefit from this by starting with the us aprs frequency and changing frequency when it enters another global region.  If not this is there possibly some means of alternating the frequency where every other packet gets transmitted  on alternating frequencies.  Thus the package becomes globally trackable.

        Eric
        AF6EP


      • Scott Miller
        Yes! I ve been pushing this for a while, but I don t know if anyone has used it. You can trigger script actions for rectangular areas defined by corner
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 13, 2011
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          Yes! I've been pushing this for a while, but I don't know if anyone has
          used it. You can trigger script actions for rectangular areas defined
          by corner coordinates, and those actions could include SETFREQ commands.

          I'm testing samples of a similar, smaller radio design, and at my
          request the manufacturer added a channel that's not written to EEPROM -
          so it can be changed as often as needed. That means it could rotate
          through multiple frequencies, including satellite uplinks. When we've
          got more APRS-capable satellites I'll have to come up with some way to
          pre-calculate access opportunities.

          Oh, and SRB just officially announced the successor to the MX146
          transmitter today. I should have a few next week, though I've already
          got back orders to fill. But it'll be a good, super-light transmit-only
          option.

          Scott

          On 12/13/2011 6:09 PM, Eric Fort wrote:
          > Could the t2-301 be scripted to change frequency using geofence
          > parameters? might be a thought for the t3-301 as well. Thinking on
          > something like a HIBAL payload may benefit from this by starting with
          > the us aprs frequency and changing frequency when it enters another
          > global region. If not this is there possibly some means of alternating
          > the frequency where every other packet gets transmitted on alternating
          > frequencies. Thus the package becomes globally trackable.
          >
          > Eric
          > AF6EP
          >
          >
        • Eric Fort
          I figured as much! That said what would be the limit to the number of rectangular areas one could define? a number such as 324 ;)comes to mind as a nice
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 13, 2011
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            I figured as much!  That said what would be the limit to the number of rectangular areas one could define?  a number such as 324 ;)comes to mind as a nice number (total 10x20 grid squares on earth)... though 32,400 (total 1x2 grid squares) would be even nicer! So what's the practical limit on what can be defined here?  The post about the HiBal that flew from CA USA to africa Got me thinking...


            Eric

            On Tue, Dec 13, 2011 at 6:32 PM, Scott Miller <scott@...> wrote:
            Yes!  I've been pushing this for a while, but I don't know if anyone has
            used it.  You can trigger script actions for rectangular areas defined
            by corner coordinates, and those actions could include SETFREQ commands.

            I'm testing samples of a similar, smaller radio design, and at my
            request the manufacturer added a channel that's not written to EEPROM -
            so it can be changed as often as needed.  That means it could rotate
            through multiple frequencies, including satellite uplinks.  When we've
            got more APRS-capable satellites I'll have to come up with some way to
            pre-calculate access opportunities.

            Oh, and SRB just officially announced the successor to the MX146
            transmitter today.  I should have a few next week, though I've already
            got back orders to fill.  But it'll be a good, super-light transmit-only
            option.

            Scott

            On 12/13/2011 6:09 PM, Eric Fort wrote:
            > Could the t2-301 be scripted to change frequency using geofence
            > parameters?  might be a thought for the t3-301 as well.  Thinking on
            > something like a HIBAL payload may benefit from this by starting with
            > the us aprs frequency and changing frequency when it enters another
            > global region.  If not this is there possibly some means of alternating
            > the frequency where every other packet gets transmitted  on alternating
            > frequencies.  Thus the package becomes globally trackable.
            >
            > Eric
            > AF6EP
            >
            >



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          • Scott Miller
            Depends on how much space is allocated to scripting. Right now it s 512 bytes, and I m not sure off the top of my head how efficiently you could write the
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 13, 2011
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              Depends on how much space is allocated to scripting. Right now it's 512
              bytes, and I'm not sure off the top of my head how efficiently you could
              write the script. I'm pretty sure each pair of coordinates (i.e., one
              rectangle) takes 16 bytes, unless I truncated the 32-bit values, which I
              don't think I did.

              For a balloon, I can't imagine you'd need more than a dozen rectangles.
              Also, it's a boolean operation and they can be nested, so you can make
              a big rectangle one setting, and a smaller rectangle within it another.

              Scott

              On 12/13/2011 9:23 PM, Eric Fort wrote:
              > I figured as much! That said what would be the limit to the number of
              > rectangular areas one could define? a number such as 324 ;)comes to
              > mind as a nice number (total 10x20 grid squares on earth)... though
              > 32,400 (total 1x2 grid squares) would be even nicer! So what's the
              > practical limit on what can be defined here? The post about the HiBal
              > that flew from CA USA to africa Got me thinking...
              >
              >
              > Eric
              >
              > On Tue, Dec 13, 2011 at 6:32 PM, Scott Miller <scott@...
              > <mailto:scott@...>> wrote:
              >
              > Yes! I've been pushing this for a while, but I don't know if anyone has
              > used it. You can trigger script actions for rectangular areas defined
              > by corner coordinates, and those actions could include SETFREQ commands.
              >
              > I'm testing samples of a similar, smaller radio design, and at my
              > request the manufacturer added a channel that's not written to EEPROM -
              > so it can be changed as often as needed. That means it could rotate
              > through multiple frequencies, including satellite uplinks. When we've
              > got more APRS-capable satellites I'll have to come up with some way to
              > pre-calculate access opportunities.
              >
              > Oh, and SRB just officially announced the successor to the MX146
              > transmitter today. I should have a few next week, though I've already
              > got back orders to fill. But it'll be a good, super-light transmit-only
              > option.
              >
              > Scott
              >
              > On 12/13/2011 6:09 PM, Eric Fort wrote:
              > > Could the t2-301 be scripted to change frequency using geofence
              > > parameters? might be a thought for the t3-301 as well. Thinking on
              > > something like a HIBAL payload may benefit from this by starting with
              > > the us aprs frequency and changing frequency when it enters another
              > > global region. If not this is there possibly some means of
              > alternating
              > > the frequency where every other packet gets transmitted on
              > alternating
              > > frequencies. Thus the package becomes globally trackable.
              > >
              > > Eric
              > > AF6EP
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
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            • James Ewen
              ... There s no need for that many! Just a few would be fine. Code space is tight. Tell me what you want and when to change and I ll have a look at a script
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 13, 2011
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                On Tue, Dec 13, 2011 at 10:23 PM, Eric Fort <eric.fort@...> wrote:

                > what would be the limit to the number of rectangular areas one
                > could define?  a number such as 324 ;)comes to mind

                There's no need for that many! Just a few would be fine. Code space is tight.

                Tell me what you want and when to change and I'll have a look at a
                script concept to do just that. Probably start over USA on 144.390
                with no path (no need for digipeater at altitude). Change to 145.825
                and a path of ARISS for satellite passes when over the ocean. Change
                to 144.800 and no path when closing in on the European coast.

                > The post about the HiBal that flew from CA USA to africa Got me thinking...

                Not quite Africa... K6RPT-11 made landfall over southern Spain a few
                minutes ago, and will be heading across the Mediterranean in a while.

                --
                James
                VE6SRV
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