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Re: pedal stroke

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  • Alan
    ... No question whatsoever on this one, mashing or pedalling squares as we used to call it is bad techique. It is inefficient, potentially damaging to the
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 17, 2009
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      --- In triceriders@yahoogroups.com, "izitfridayyet" <izitfridayyet@...> wrote:
      >
      > I get mail from another group and a member was preaching the value of mashing the pedals to the point of using the seat back to apply maximum mash. To me the key to riding a recumbent fast or at least efficiently and not to mention saving your knees is a proper pedal stroke which is to apply power to the pedals all the way around the stroke. You should be able to reach down and apply light pressure to your top chain tube and feel no breaks in power. Am I in the minority? I work on it constantly. I'm convinced it's worth the effort.
      >
      > Basically this is a poll. Non acceptable replies range from:
      > I have terra whatevr idlers. I don't have a top tube.
      > What's your hurry son?? Why donchya slow down and smell the roses???
      > I have too-be-doo disease. By belly sticks out further than my top-too-be-doo
      >
      > No really i think this deserves discussion.
      >

      No question whatsoever on this one, mashing or 'pedalling squares' as we used to call it is bad techique. It is inefficient, potentially damaging to the knees and limits cadence.
      What we should be striving for is fast, smooth pedalling with lots of ankling to help the pedals over the dead spots at top and bottom of the stroke. It also helps to unload the leg which is on the upstroke so the other leg doesn't have to lift it in addition to applying power to the pedal. (In the case of a recumbent 'up' and 'down' are relative to the rider rather than the vertical).
      This is not really relevant to strict recumbent fans, but lots of us rode fixed wheel during the winter and early season (some of us still do, grin) as fixed basically forces you to develop good pedalling technique.
    • crowqnt
      ... I think various egg heads at Nottingham University have carried studies on cadence speeds and come the conclusion that a cadence of 80 or above is what one
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 23, 2009
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        --- In triceriders@yahoogroups.com, "Alan" <riggeral@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In triceriders@yahoogroups.com, "izitfridayyet" <izitfridayyet@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I get mail from another group and a member was preaching the value of mashing the pedals to the point of using the seat back to apply maximum mash. To me the key to riding a recumbent fast or at least efficiently and not to mention saving your knees is a proper pedal stroke which is to apply power to the pedals all the way around the stroke. You should be able to reach down and apply light pressure to your top chain tube and feel no breaks in power. Am I in the minority? I work on it constantly. I'm convinced it's worth the effort.
        > >
        > > Basically this is a poll. Non acceptable replies range from:
        > > I have terra whatevr idlers. I don't have a top tube.
        > > What's your hurry son?? Why donchya slow down and smell the roses???
        > > I have too-be-doo disease. By belly sticks out further than my top-too-be-doo
        > >
        > > No really i think this deserves discussion.
        > >
        >
        > No question whatsoever on this one, mashing or 'pedalling squares' as we used to call it is bad techique. It is inefficient, potentially damaging to the knees and limits cadence.
        > What we should be striving for is fast, smooth pedalling with lots of ankling to help the pedals over the dead spots at top and bottom of the stroke. It also helps to unload the leg which is on the upstroke so the other leg doesn't have to lift it in addition to applying power to the pedal. (In the case of a recumbent 'up' and 'down' are relative to the rider rather than the vertical).
        > This is not really relevant to strict recumbent fans, but lots of us rode fixed wheel during the winter and early season (some of us still do, grin) as fixed basically forces you to develop good pedalling technique.
        >
        I think various egg heads at Nottingham University have carried studies on cadence speeds and come the conclusion that a cadence of 80 or above is what one should aim for. I've never been able to mash at low speed let alone higher cadences. If you want to smash your knees and end up with a patella replacement then by all means Mash the pedals. I think the jingle went "for smash get mash" or wuz it t'other way round! Oop's the length of ma fangs be showing!!
        Ted.
      • Jeffrey A Levy M.D. FACR
        I just got my first recumbent (Trice Q) - could you explain what you mean by ankling ? Right now I m trying to understand the basics of the recumbent stroke.
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 23, 2009
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          I just got my first recumbent (Trice Q) - could you explain what you
          mean by "ankling"? Right now I'm trying to understand the basics of
          the recumbent stroke. Thanks Jeff
        • Alan
          ... In retrospect I was probably wrong to mention the subject in the first place as ankling is something of a contentious issue these days. Given that the
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 24, 2009
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            --- In triceriders@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey A Levy M.D. FACR" <levyjmd@...> wrote:
            >
            > I just got my first recumbent (Trice Q) - could you explain what you
            > mean by "ankling"? Right now I'm trying to understand the basics of
            > the recumbent stroke. Thanks Jeff
            >
            In retrospect I was probably wrong to mention the subject in the first place as ankling is something of a contentious issue these days.
            Given that the objective is to apply power to the pedals for as much of the circle as possible, the two 'dead spots' at top and bottom dead centre are the weak points. The idea of ankling was to drop the heel slightly as the pedal approached the top in order to apply a little forward push across TDC and to drop the toes and 'claw' the pedal back across BDC.
            Most club coaches back in the 60's taught that method, including my own from the RAFCC.
            Like most things, ideas and fashions change and current thinking is that ankling probably doesn't achieve very much so coaches don't usually teach it any more.
            Basically it is a case of whatever works for you and sometimes it is easier to continue with a technique you are comfortable with than chase the latest ideas.
          • izitfridayyet
            Read this... http://www.bicycling.com/article/1,6610,s1-4-41-15647-1,00.html It will haunt and benefit you for the rest of your days.
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 24, 2009
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              Read this...
              http://www.bicycling.com/article/1,6610,s1-4-41-15647-1,00.html
              It will haunt and benefit you for the rest of your days.

              --- In triceriders@yahoogroups.com, "Alan" <riggeral@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In triceriders@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey A Levy M.D. FACR" <levyjmd@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I just got my first recumbent (Trice Q) - could you explain what you
              > > mean by "ankling"? Right now I'm trying to understand the basics of
              > > the recumbent stroke. Thanks Jeff
              > >
              > In retrospect I was probably wrong to mention the subject in the first place as ankling is something of a contentious issue these days.
              > Given that the objective is to apply power to the pedals for as much of the circle as possible, the two 'dead spots' at top and bottom dead centre are the weak points. The idea of ankling was to drop the heel slightly as the pedal approached the top in order to apply a little forward push across TDC and to drop the toes and 'claw' the pedal back across BDC.
              > Most club coaches back in the 60's taught that method, including my own from the RAFCC.
              > Like most things, ideas and fashions change and current thinking is that ankling probably doesn't achieve very much so coaches don't usually teach it any more.
              > Basically it is a case of whatever works for you and sometimes it is easier to continue with a technique you are comfortable with than chase the latest ideas.
              >
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