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He is everywhere thread

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  • Tweed Roosevelt
    The following is a contuniation of the He is everywhere thread: In the 2002 annual report of the town of Tisbury, Massachusetts (Martha s Vineyard), one of
    Message 1 of 28 , Aug 4, 2003
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      The following is a contuniation of the "He is everywhere" thread:

      In the 2002 annual report of the town of Tisbury, Massachusetts (Martha's
      Vineyard), one of the section starts with the "Man in the Arena" quote and
      continues: "This quotation from a speech by President Theodore Roosevelt
      was the basis for the idea that Selectmen having served the Town should be
      honored and remembered. Thus, in 1996 the concept was born to honor former
      Selectmen with the dedication of a Governor Carver Chair, bearing the
      Selectman's name and years of service on a bronze plaque, to be placed in
      the Katharine Cornell Memorial Theatre in the Tisbury Town Hall."
    • Vince Liberto
      This past weekend was incredible for me and my family. I did some business with The Fairmont Hotel in New Orleans; for years it was called the Roosevelt Hotel
      Message 2 of 28 , Aug 4, 2003
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        This past weekend was incredible for me and my
        family.
        I did some business with The Fairmont Hotel in
        New Orleans; for years it was called the
        Roosevelt Hotel in honor of TR, because the first
        owner had met TR while he was down here
        campaigning and trying to pick up sugar cane
        farmer votes. Anyway, I was given a complimentary
        suite to entertain some of our business
        associates, and as fate would have it, the name
        of the suite given to me was "THE ROOSEVELT
        SUITE". I could have just as easily had the
        "DIXIE" or the "MAGNOLIA", but I got "Roosevelt".
        I was pleased. Maybe it was a joke because I had
        spoken to a few folks about getting the hotel
        back to its original name or maybe at least
        calling it the "FAIRMONT-ROOSEVELT HOTEL".
        Also, The Fairmont in New Orleans was the first
        place a woman was able to order a cocktail, and
        the birthplace of the sazerac drink.
        I must add, I had two sazeracs after two glasses
        of champagne in the Roosevelt suite, and I'm
        still suffering. What was I thinking? I was just
        caught up in all the revelry of my special
        reception for a few of our greatest business
        associates in MY "Roosevelt Suite".
        Great fun,
        Vince Liberto
        New Orleans
        P.S. I might get them to put a photo of TR in
        there.
        --- Tweed Roosevelt <tweed@...> wrote:
        > The following is a contuniation of the "He is
        > everywhere" thread:
        >
        > In the 2002 annual report of the town of
        > Tisbury, Massachusetts (Martha's
        > Vineyard), one of the section starts with the
        > "Man in the Arena" quote and
        > continues: "This quotation from a speech by
        > President Theodore Roosevelt
        > was the basis for the idea that Selectmen
        > having served the Town should be
        > honored and remembered. Thus, in 1996 the
        > concept was born to honor former
        > Selectmen with the dedication of a Governor
        > Carver Chair, bearing the
        > Selectman's name and years of service on a
        > bronze plaque, to be placed in
        > the Katharine Cornell Memorial Theatre in the
        > Tisbury Town Hall."
        >
        >


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      • sherryj@u.arizona.edu
        ... That would be nice of them. I don t foresee ever being in New Orleans but if I ever DO happen to get over that way, I will try to make a point to visit the
        Message 3 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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          > P.S. I might get them to put a photo of TR in
          > there.

          That would be nice of them. I don't foresee ever being in New Orleans but if I ever
          DO happen to get over that way, I will try to make a point to visit the Fairmount-
          Roosevelt Hotel and ask them about the history of it. Tons of people are
          interested in history and it could be a draw for business for the owners.

          I know there is a Roosevelt Lake in Arizona named after TR but I don't know what
          namesake things are there because I've never been there. I believe it draws a lot
          of boaters. I ought to put a trip there on my To Do list ~~ my Nice To Do list.

          Sherry
        • pathfinder6436830
          FROM HOTELS TO CABINS. Connections with TR abound. I have included some information about the Roosevelt Cabin, located on the campus of Berry College, Mount
          Message 4 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            FROM HOTELS TO CABINS. Connections with TR abound. I have included
            some information about the "Roosevelt Cabin," located on the campus of
            Berry College, Mount Berry, near Rome, Georgia. Of course, TR's
            family connections with the State of Georgia are well-known, i.e.,
            Bulloch Hall in Roswell. In another point of presidential history,
            Mrs. Ellen A. Wilson, the first wife of President Woodrow Wilson is
            buried in nearby Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome. The great thing about
            history is that it is everywhere. Many of us can probably identify TR
            associated sites right around the corner from us. In addition to Berry
            College, I have lived near the Tuskegee Institute National Historic
            Site, Tuskegee , Alabama. Of course, TR's connection with Booker T.
            Washington, the founder of Tuskegee Institute, is well-known. I
            believe that TR served on the Board of Trustees at Tuskegee. Now
            Tuskegee University, the campus offers a well preserved view of the
            times in which Booker T. Washington lived. I urge further efforts to
            recognize TR's association with Tuskegee, cognizant of the unique
            challenges that existed for both TR and Booker T. Washington in
            nurturing that relationship.


            THE INFORMATION BELOW IS TAKEN FROM THE BERRY COLLEGE WEBSITE AT
            http://www2.berry.edu/oakhill/roosevelt.asp (A picture of the cabin is
            displayed on the website)


            Roosevelt Cabin, first referred to only as "the Cabin," one of the
            oldest buildings on the main campus, symbolizes more than any other
            building Miss Berry's history and philosophy. Soon after the schools
            opened in 1902, Miss Berry and Captain John Gibbs Barnwell, architect
            for the Berry Schools, drew up plans for a rustic log cabin which was
            to serve as a guest house and a social center/demonstration cottage,
            intended, as Elizabeth Brewster later put it, to demonstrate to the
            highlanders that "a home may be simple and inexpensive and at the same
            time in good taste and even beautiful."

            In these early days the cabin was the heart of the campus in several
            ways. It caught the overflow from the small school kitchen in
            Brewster Hall; there were usually a large black iron pot of beans
            boiling on one fireplace and potatoes roasting in a bed of coals in
            the other. Here Miss Berry worked to help students acquire poise and
            polish; she insisted that everyone (students and teacher alike) speak
            up at her Sunday afternoons and other social gatherings, that they
            make little speeches and offer toasts (using coffee or water). Daily
            prayer services were held in the Cabin, and Miss Berry taught Sunday
            school there; in inclement weather Sunday worship services were held
            indoors.

            For many years the Cabin served as a guest house, and the visits of
            several very important persons are associated with it. The most
            famous visitor to the cabin was former President Theodore Roosevelt,
            who had a luncheon there during his visit on October 8, 1910. The
            next day The Cabin was renamed Roosevelt Cabin by Miss Berry.
            President Roosevelt and his party arrived at the Rome depot in a
            pouring rain and drove over the campus in the schools' oxcart, which
            he insisted on driving himself. Afterwards they were served a meal in
            the cabin. Walter Johnson, a student, was assigned to wait on the
            table. (END)

            Jim Johnson

            --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, sherryj@u... wrote:
            > > P.S. I might get them to put a photo of TR in
            > > there.
            >
            > That would be nice of them. I don't foresee ever being in New
            Orleans but if I ever
            > DO happen to get over that way, I will try to make a point to visit
            the Fairmount-
            > Roosevelt Hotel and ask them about the history of it. Tons of people
            are
            > interested in history and it could be a draw for business for the
            owners.
            >
            > I know there is a Roosevelt Lake in Arizona named after TR but I
            don't know what
            > namesake things are there because I've never been there. I believe
            it draws a lot
            > of boaters. I ought to put a trip there on my To Do list ~~ my Nice
            To Do list.
            >
            > Sherry
          • Wynn Capt Gregory A
            --There is a wonderful multi-page program/booklet of the one-day event for TR s visit to this school that exists. In it, are photos and the
            Message 5 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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              --There is a wonderful multi-page program/booklet of the one-day event for
              TR's visit to this school that exists. In it, are photos and the
              schedule-of-events, as well as, TR's remarks that day.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: pathfinder6436830 [mailto:pathfinder6436830@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 12:43 PM
              To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: A ROOSEVELTIAN WEEKENDRe: [tr-m] He is everywhere thread


              FROM HOTELS TO CABINS. Connections with TR abound. I have included
              some information about the "Roosevelt Cabin," located on the campus of
              Berry College, Mount Berry, near Rome, Georgia. Of course, TR's
              family connections with the State of Georgia are well-known, i.e.,
              Bulloch Hall in Roswell. In another point of presidential history,
              Mrs. Ellen A. Wilson, the first wife of President Woodrow Wilson is
              buried in nearby Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome. The great thing about
              history is that it is everywhere. Many of us can probably identify TR
              associated sites right around the corner from us. In addition to Berry
              College, I have lived near the Tuskegee Institute National Historic
              Site, Tuskegee , Alabama. Of course, TR's connection with Booker T.
              Washington, the founder of Tuskegee Institute, is well-known. I
              believe that TR served on the Board of Trustees at Tuskegee. Now
              Tuskegee University, the campus offers a well preserved view of the
              times in which Booker T. Washington lived. I urge further efforts to
              recognize TR's association with Tuskegee, cognizant of the unique
              challenges that existed for both TR and Booker T. Washington in
              nurturing that relationship.


              THE INFORMATION BELOW IS TAKEN FROM THE BERRY COLLEGE WEBSITE AT
              http://www2.berry.edu/oakhill/roosevelt.asp (A picture of the cabin is
              displayed on the website)


              Roosevelt Cabin, first referred to only as "the Cabin," one of the
              oldest buildings on the main campus, symbolizes more than any other
              building Miss Berry's history and philosophy. Soon after the schools
              opened in 1902, Miss Berry and Captain John Gibbs Barnwell, architect
              for the Berry Schools, drew up plans for a rustic log cabin which was
              to serve as a guest house and a social center/demonstration cottage,
              intended, as Elizabeth Brewster later put it, to demonstrate to the
              highlanders that "a home may be simple and inexpensive and at the same
              time in good taste and even beautiful."

              In these early days the cabin was the heart of the campus in several
              ways. It caught the overflow from the small school kitchen in
              Brewster Hall; there were usually a large black iron pot of beans
              boiling on one fireplace and potatoes roasting in a bed of coals in
              the other. Here Miss Berry worked to help students acquire poise and
              polish; she insisted that everyone (students and teacher alike) speak
              up at her Sunday afternoons and other social gatherings, that they
              make little speeches and offer toasts (using coffee or water). Daily
              prayer services were held in the Cabin, and Miss Berry taught Sunday
              school there; in inclement weather Sunday worship services were held
              indoors.

              For many years the Cabin served as a guest house, and the visits of
              several very important persons are associated with it. The most
              famous visitor to the cabin was former President Theodore Roosevelt,
              who had a luncheon there during his visit on October 8, 1910. The
              next day The Cabin was renamed Roosevelt Cabin by Miss Berry.
              President Roosevelt and his party arrived at the Rome depot in a
              pouring rain and drove over the campus in the schools' oxcart, which
              he insisted on driving himself. Afterwards they were served a meal in
              the cabin. Walter Johnson, a student, was assigned to wait on the
              table. (END)

              Jim Johnson

              --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, sherryj@u... wrote:
              > > P.S. I might get them to put a photo of TR in
              > > there.
              >
              > That would be nice of them. I don't foresee ever being in New
              Orleans but if I ever
              > DO happen to get over that way, I will try to make a point to visit
              the Fairmount-
              > Roosevelt Hotel and ask them about the history of it. Tons of people
              are
              > interested in history and it could be a draw for business for the
              owners.
              >
              > I know there is a Roosevelt Lake in Arizona named after TR but I
              don't know what
              > namesake things are there because I've never been there. I believe
              it draws a lot
              > of boaters. I ought to put a trip there on my To Do list ~~ my Nice
              To Do list.
              >
              > Sherry



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            • John A. Gable
              Vince, I think the idea of renaming the hotel the Roosevelt-Fairmont Hotel is a great one. The hotel was, of course, the Roosevelt Hotel for many, many years,
              Message 6 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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                Vince,
                I think the idea of renaming the hotel the Roosevelt-Fairmont Hotel is a
                great one. The hotel was, of course, the Roosevelt Hotel for many, many
                years, and is one of the great hotels of the city. Maybe we could get an
                e-mail address and a street address for the Fairmont and write to them and
                suggest the change. Vince, can you get us those addresses ?
                Best wishes from Oyster Bay,
                John Gable
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Vince Liberto" <v_liberto@...>
                To: <tr-m@yahoogroups.com>; "TRA" <troosevelt@egroups.com>
                Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 2:34 AM
                Subject: A ROOSEVELTIAN WEEKENDRe: [tr-m] He is everywhere thread


                > This past weekend was incredible for me and my
                > family.
                > I did some business with The Fairmont Hotel in
                > New Orleans; for years it was called the
                > Roosevelt Hotel in honor of TR, because the first
                > owner had met TR while he was down here
                > campaigning and trying to pick up sugar cane
                > farmer votes. Anyway, I was given a complimentary
                > suite to entertain some of our business
                > associates, and as fate would have it, the name
                > of the suite given to me was "THE ROOSEVELT
                > SUITE". I could have just as easily had the
                > "DIXIE" or the "MAGNOLIA", but I got "Roosevelt".
                > I was pleased. Maybe it was a joke because I had
                > spoken to a few folks about getting the hotel
                > back to its original name or maybe at least
                > calling it the "FAIRMONT-ROOSEVELT HOTEL".
                > Also, The Fairmont in New Orleans was the first
                > place a woman was able to order a cocktail, and
                > the birthplace of the sazerac drink.
                > I must add, I had two sazeracs after two glasses
                > of champagne in the Roosevelt suite, and I'm
                > still suffering. What was I thinking? I was just
                > caught up in all the revelry of my special
                > reception for a few of our greatest business
                > associates in MY "Roosevelt Suite".
                > Great fun,
                > Vince Liberto
                > New Orleans
                > P.S. I might get them to put a photo of TR in
                > there.
                > --- Tweed Roosevelt <tweed@...> wrote:
                > > The following is a contuniation of the "He is
                > > everywhere" thread:
                > >
                > > In the 2002 annual report of the town of
                > > Tisbury, Massachusetts (Martha's
                > > Vineyard), one of the section starts with the
                > > "Man in the Arena" quote and
                > > continues: "This quotation from a speech by
                > > President Theodore Roosevelt
                > > was the basis for the idea that Selectmen
                > > having served the Town should be
                > > honored and remembered. Thus, in 1996 the
                > > concept was born to honor former
                > > Selectmen with the dedication of a Governor
                > > Carver Chair, bearing the
                > > Selectman's name and years of service on a
                > > bronze plaque, to be placed in
                > > the Katharine Cornell Memorial Theatre in the
                > > Tisbury Town Hall."
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > __________________________________
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                > Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free, easy-to-use web site design software
                > http://sitebuilder.yahoo.com
                >
                >
                > To Post a message, send it to: tr-m@...
                > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: tr-m-unsubscribe@...
                >
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                >
                >
                >
              • John A. Gable
                The lake was created by the great Theodore Roosevelt Dam, which was dedicated in 1911, the most impressive project (the Salt River Project) TR launched under
                Message 7 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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                  The lake was created by the great Theodore Roosevelt Dam, which was
                  dedicated in 1911, the most impressive project (the Salt River Project) TR
                  launched under the Newlands Irrigation Act of 1902.
                  J. Gable
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: <sherryj@...>
                  To: <tr-m@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 10:43 AM
                  Subject: Re: A ROOSEVELTIAN WEEKENDRe: [tr-m] He is everywhere thread


                  > > P.S. I might get them to put a photo of TR in
                  > > there.
                  >
                  > That would be nice of them. I don't foresee ever being in New Orleans but
                  if I ever
                  > DO happen to get over that way, I will try to make a point to visit the
                  Fairmount-
                  > Roosevelt Hotel and ask them about the history of it. Tons of people are
                  > interested in history and it could be a draw for business for the owners.
                  >
                  > I know there is a Roosevelt Lake in Arizona named after TR but I don't
                  know what
                  > namesake things are there because I've never been there. I believe it
                  draws a lot
                  > of boaters. I ought to put a trip there on my To Do list ~~ my Nice To Do
                  list.
                  >
                  > Sherry
                  >
                  >
                  > To Post a message, send it to: tr-m@...
                  > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: tr-m-unsubscribe@...
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                • sherryj@u.arizona.edu
                  Thanks for that. I thought there was a dam but was not sure if I was correct in thinking it was in Arizona ~ putting the two together makes perfect sense now,
                  Message 8 of 28 , Aug 5, 2003
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                    Thanks for that. I thought there was a dam but was not sure if I was correct in
                    thinking it was in Arizona ~ putting the two together makes perfect sense now, so
                    I appreciate that information. The lake and dam must be closer to me than I
                    realized because folks from my area often drive north to go innertubing down the
                    Salt River, but I've just never heard it connected before with the Roosevelt Dam. I'll
                    mention this fact the next time I hear of anybody headed up that way.

                    > The lake was created by the great Theodore Roosevelt Dam, which was
                    > dedicated in 1911, the most impressive project (the Salt River
                    > Project) TR launched under the Newlands Irrigation Act of 1902.
                    > J. Gable
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: <sherryj@...>
                    > To: <tr-m@yahoogroups.com>
                    > Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 10:43 AM
                    > Subject: Re: A ROOSEVELTIAN WEEKENDRe: [tr-m] He is everywhere thread
                    >
                    >
                    > > > P.S. I might get them to put a photo of TR in
                    > > > there.
                    > >
                    > > That would be nice of them. I don't foresee ever being in New
                    > > Orleans but
                    > if I ever
                    > > DO happen to get over that way, I will try to make a point to visit
                    > > the
                    > Fairmount-
                    > > Roosevelt Hotel and ask them about the history of it. Tons of people
                    > > are interested in history and it could be a draw for business for
                    > > the owners.
                    > >
                    > > I know there is a Roosevelt Lake in Arizona named after TR but I
                    > > don't
                    > know what
                    > > namesake things are there because I've never been there. I believe
                    > > it
                    > draws a lot
                    > > of boaters. I ought to put a trip there on my To Do list ~~ my Nice
                    > > To Do
                    > list.
                    > >
                    > > Sherry
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > To Post a message, send it to: tr-m@...
                    > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                    > > tr-m-unsubscribe@...
                    > >
                    > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                    > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                  • John A. Gable
                    Martha Berry of Georgia received the Theodore Roosevelt Distinguished Service Medal, in a ceremony at the White House, in 1925. This year s recipient, by the
                    Message 9 of 28 , Aug 6, 2003
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                      Martha Berry of Georgia received the Theodore Roosevelt Distinguished
                      Service Medal, in a ceremony at the White House, in 1925. This year's
                      recipient, by the way will be William J. vanden Heuvel, former ambassador to
                      the United Nations, former aide to Robert F. Kennedy, investment banker,
                      attorney, head of the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute and a founder
                      of the Roosevelt Study center in The Netherlands. Be there at the Roosevelt
                      Hotel in New York City, at the annual dinner of the TRA, on Friday, October
                      24, 2003.
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Wynn Capt Gregory A" <WynnGA@...>
                      To: <tr-m@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 12:51 PM
                      Subject: RE: A ROOSEVELTIAN WEEKENDRe: [tr-m] He is everywhere thread


                      > --There is a wonderful multi-page program/booklet of the one-day event for
                      > TR's visit to this school that exists. In it, are photos and the
                      > schedule-of-events, as well as, TR's remarks that day.
                      >
                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: pathfinder6436830 [mailto:pathfinder6436830@...]
                      > Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 12:43 PM
                      > To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: A ROOSEVELTIAN WEEKENDRe: [tr-m] He is everywhere thread
                      >
                      >
                      > FROM HOTELS TO CABINS. Connections with TR abound. I have included
                      > some information about the "Roosevelt Cabin," located on the campus of
                      > Berry College, Mount Berry, near Rome, Georgia. Of course, TR's
                      > family connections with the State of Georgia are well-known, i.e.,
                      > Bulloch Hall in Roswell. In another point of presidential history,
                      > Mrs. Ellen A. Wilson, the first wife of President Woodrow Wilson is
                      > buried in nearby Myrtle Hill Cemetery in Rome. The great thing about
                      > history is that it is everywhere. Many of us can probably identify TR
                      > associated sites right around the corner from us. In addition to Berry
                      > College, I have lived near the Tuskegee Institute National Historic
                      > Site, Tuskegee , Alabama. Of course, TR's connection with Booker T.
                      > Washington, the founder of Tuskegee Institute, is well-known. I
                      > believe that TR served on the Board of Trustees at Tuskegee. Now
                      > Tuskegee University, the campus offers a well preserved view of the
                      > times in which Booker T. Washington lived. I urge further efforts to
                      > recognize TR's association with Tuskegee, cognizant of the unique
                      > challenges that existed for both TR and Booker T. Washington in
                      > nurturing that relationship.
                      >
                      >
                      > THE INFORMATION BELOW IS TAKEN FROM THE BERRY COLLEGE WEBSITE AT
                      > http://www2.berry.edu/oakhill/roosevelt.asp (A picture of the cabin is
                      > displayed on the website)
                      >
                      >
                      > Roosevelt Cabin, first referred to only as "the Cabin," one of the
                      > oldest buildings on the main campus, symbolizes more than any other
                      > building Miss Berry's history and philosophy. Soon after the schools
                      > opened in 1902, Miss Berry and Captain John Gibbs Barnwell, architect
                      > for the Berry Schools, drew up plans for a rustic log cabin which was
                      > to serve as a guest house and a social center/demonstration cottage,
                      > intended, as Elizabeth Brewster later put it, to demonstrate to the
                      > highlanders that "a home may be simple and inexpensive and at the same
                      > time in good taste and even beautiful."
                      >
                      > In these early days the cabin was the heart of the campus in several
                      > ways. It caught the overflow from the small school kitchen in
                      > Brewster Hall; there were usually a large black iron pot of beans
                      > boiling on one fireplace and potatoes roasting in a bed of coals in
                      > the other. Here Miss Berry worked to help students acquire poise and
                      > polish; she insisted that everyone (students and teacher alike) speak
                      > up at her Sunday afternoons and other social gatherings, that they
                      > make little speeches and offer toasts (using coffee or water). Daily
                      > prayer services were held in the Cabin, and Miss Berry taught Sunday
                      > school there; in inclement weather Sunday worship services were held
                      > indoors.
                      >
                      > For many years the Cabin served as a guest house, and the visits of
                      > several very important persons are associated with it. The most
                      > famous visitor to the cabin was former President Theodore Roosevelt,
                      > who had a luncheon there during his visit on October 8, 1910. The
                      > next day The Cabin was renamed Roosevelt Cabin by Miss Berry.
                      > President Roosevelt and his party arrived at the Rome depot in a
                      > pouring rain and drove over the campus in the schools' oxcart, which
                      > he insisted on driving himself. Afterwards they were served a meal in
                      > the cabin. Walter Johnson, a student, was assigned to wait on the
                      > table. (END)
                      >
                      > Jim Johnson
                      >
                      > --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, sherryj@u... wrote:
                      > > > P.S. I might get them to put a photo of TR in
                      > > > there.
                      > >
                      > > That would be nice of them. I don't foresee ever being in New
                      > Orleans but if I ever
                      > > DO happen to get over that way, I will try to make a point to visit
                      > the Fairmount-
                      > > Roosevelt Hotel and ask them about the history of it. Tons of people
                      > are
                      > > interested in history and it could be a draw for business for the
                      > owners.
                      > >
                      > > I know there is a Roosevelt Lake in Arizona named after TR but I
                      > don't know what
                      > > namesake things are there because I've never been there. I believe
                      > it draws a lot
                      > > of boaters. I ought to put a trip there on my To Do list ~~ my Nice
                      > To Do list.
                      > >
                      > > Sherry
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > To Post a message, send it to: tr-m@...
                      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: tr-m-unsubscribe@...
                      >
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                    • Tweed Roosevelt
                      In Scott Cookman s book, Iceblink, (John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2000) about the spectacularly doomed British1845 Sir John Franklin expedition to find the Northwest
                      Message 10 of 28 , Aug 13, 2003
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                        In Scott Cookman's book, Iceblink, (John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2000) about the spectacularly doomed British1845 Sir John Franklin expedition to find the Northwest passage:

                        "That fate (a malfunction of the propellers and rudders of Franklin's ships) befell American Robert E. Peary's Roosevelt in the Arctic around Cape Sheridan in the summer of 1905.  As the ship worked through channels in the pack, ice sheared the propeller clean off, ripping away the rudder and entire sternpost at the same time.  At once, the Roosevelt began taking on so much water that it almost overmastered the ship's pumps and Peary prepared to abandon ship.  Jury-rigged repairs to the hull barely kept it afloat, but it was all but helpless.  Fortunately, the current carried the pack ice, and Roosevelt along with it, south for a month and a half, until the ship could be beached for repairs."

                        TR, as might be imagined, was very interested in Arctic exploration, no doubt because of the romance and adventure involved.  Peary, who was no fool, had named his ship after TR and stopped at Oyster Bay in 1905 on his way to the Arctic.  Later when Peary claimed to have reached the North Pole, TR was one of Peary's most adamant supporter, dismissing his detractors with disdain.  After all TR, who loved to see the United States cast in the best possible light, was only too delighted to believe that the U.S. had beaten all other contenders.

                        By the way, as a child I spent much time with my grandfather, Archibald Roosevelt TR's third son, who also was a passionate supporter of Peary's claim.  I have read quite widely on the subject, and tend to agree with the view of most modern historians who believe that Peary did not reach the North Pole.

                        On a related subject, TR knew Joshua Slocum, the famous mariner who was the first person to sail around the world alone.  On Slocum's ill fated last voyage, he stopped off at Oyster Bay for several days to visit with TR.  During that period, my grandfather sailed with Slocum, and there was even talk of his continuing on with him to South America, firmly squelched by Edith.  It is just as well he didn't, at least from my point of view, as Slocum and his famous boat Spray, disappeared off the coast of South America without a trace.

                      • Tweed Roosevelt
                        In the Oxford Sherlock Holmes volume 1, the footnote to the text word bullier on page 72 reads: bullier: better. Not then absolutely de rigueur in allegedly
                        Message 11 of 28 , Dec 25, 2004
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                          In the Oxford Sherlock Holmes volume 1, the footnote to the text word
                          "bullier" on page 72 reads:

                          bullier: better. Not then absolutely de rigueur in allegedly authentic
                          frontier talk until noisily adopted by Theodore Roosevelt

                          A Study in Scarlet, ed Owen Dudley Edwards, Oxford University Press,
                          Oxford, 1993, page 185
                        • Ryan Valeriano
                          Can you help me identify some people in a picture with TR? I tried to mail it to you but this address cannot accept a file this large. Ryan ...
                          Message 12 of 28 , Dec 27, 2004
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                            Can you help me identify some people in a picture with TR? I tried to
                            mail it to you but this address cannot accept a file this large.

                            Ryan
                            On Saturday, December 25, 2004, at 01:10 PM, Tweed Roosevelt wrote:

                            >
                            >
                            > In the Oxford Sherlock Holmes volume 1, the footnote to the text word
                            > "bullier" on page 72 reads:
                            >    
                            >       bullier: better.  Not then absolutely de rigueur in allegedly
                            > authentic
                            > frontier talk until noisily adopted by Theodore Roosevelt
                            >
                            >             A Study in Scarlet, ed Owen Dudley Edwards, Oxford
                            > University Press,
                            > Oxford, 1993, page 185
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
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                            <image.tiff>
                            >
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                            <image.tiff>
                            >
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                          • Theodore Roosevelt Assn.
                            Ryan, If you go to the tr-m yahoo group home page, you can click on the PHOTOS link. It will walk you through the process of up-loading the photo to the
                            Message 13 of 28 , Dec 31, 2004
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                              Ryan,

                              If you go to the tr-m yahoo group home page, you can click on the "PHOTOS" link. It will walk you through the process of up-loading the photo to the site. Once that is done, we can all take a look at the picture.

                              Best wishes from Oyster Bay,

                              Linda E. Milano
                              Assistant Director
                              Theodore Roosevelt Association

                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: Ryan Valeriano <ryanv@...>
                              Sent: Dec 27, 2004 7:03 PM
                              To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [tr-m] He is everywhere thread

                              Can you help me identify some people in a picture with TR? I tried to
                              mail it to you but this address cannot accept a file this large.

                              Ryan
                              On Saturday, December 25, 2004, at 01:10 PM, Tweed Roosevelt wrote:

                              >
                              >
                              > In the Oxford Sherlock Holmes volume 1, the footnote to the text word
                              > "bullier" on page 72 reads:
                              >    
                              >       bullier: better.  Not then absolutely de rigueur in allegedly
                              > authentic
                              > frontier talk until noisily adopted by Theodore Roosevelt
                              >
                              >             A Study in Scarlet, ed Owen Dudley Edwards, Oxford
                              > University Press,
                              > Oxford, 1993, page 185
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > To Post a message, send it to:   tr-m@...
                              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: tr-m-unsubscribe@...
                              >
                              >
                              <image.tiff>
                              >
                              >
                              <image.tiff>
                              >
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                              >
                              > ? To visit your group on the web, go to:
                              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/tr-m/
                              >  
                              > ? To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                              > tr-m-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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                            • Tweed Roosevelt
                              In David Von Drehle s excellent social history of the turn of the century which focuses on the famous Triangle Waist Company fire of March 25, 1911: When
                              Message 14 of 28 , Jan 2, 2005
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                                In David Von Drehle's excellent social history of the turn of the century
                                which focuses on the famous Triangle Waist Company fire of March 25, 1911:

                                "When Theodore Roosevelt ran for president in 1904, the Lower East Side
                                (of New York City) voted heavily for him, hailing the progressive
                                Republicans as 'the worker's liberator.' Four years later, after a
                                devastating depression, the slums turned to socialist presidential
                                candidate Eugene V. Debs." (Note TR was not the candidate in the 1908
                                election, but rather William Howard Taft.)

                                David Von Drehle, Triangle; the fire which changed America, Atlantic
                                Monthly Press, New York, 2003 p,31
                              • Tweed Roosevelt
                                Arthur Train wrote a wonderful series of stories for the Saturday Evening Post in the 1920 s about Ephraim Tutt, a fictional old Yankee lawyer who practiced in
                                Message 15 of 28 , Jan 12, 2005
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                                  Arthur Train wrote a wonderful series of stories for the Saturday Evening
                                  Post in the 1920's about Ephraim Tutt, a fictional old Yankee lawyer who
                                  practiced in New York during that period and was a sort of precursor to
                                  Horace Rumpole. Tutt used the law to obtain justice for his poor but
                                  honest clients who were generally being persecuted by lawyers more
                                  interested in using the letter of the law to victimize the vulnerable.

                                  In the story, "The House that Tutt Built", an old women is about to be
                                  thrown out of the house her family had owned for generations and she has
                                  lived in all her life. The greedy neighbor has gotten hold of the mortgage
                                  and over a technicality has acquired the right to accelerate the mortgage
                                  and demand full payment. The old women, who never married, cannot make the
                                  payment and her situation looks hopeless until Mr. Tutt steps in. The old
                                  lady is explaining her situation to Mr. Tutt:

                                  "You see, my--my fiance was killed at San Juan, fighting with Colonel
                                  Roosevelt in the Spanish War."

                                  Mr. Tutt's Case Book, by Arthur Train, Charles Scribner's Sons,
                                  1936, p. 259

                                  By the way, I assume that Arthur Train was not implying that TR had killed
                                  her fiance.
                                • tbaker@pro-ns.net
                                  Hey y all! I got a request from my rattie list to verify this - can anyone help? This quote/statement has appeared on a rattie web site and we are trying to
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Feb 10, 2005
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                                    Hey y'all!

                                    I got a request from my rattie list to verify this - can anyone help?

                                    This quote/statement has appeared on a rattie web site and we are trying to
                                    find if this is indeed true:

                                    >>"Life Magazine showed President Roosevelt with 3 black and tan RT's">>>

                                    Has anyone ever seen this article? Does anyone know what issue/month? Any
                                    information will be appreciated! There was no pic, so if anyone can direct me
                                    to an online source to view the image or the article I would be in your debt!

                                    Thanks,

                                    Theresa Baker
                                    RatpiT Kennels
                                  • Tweed Roosevelt
                                    In Leslie S. Klinger s magnificent The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, W. W. Norton, New York, 2005, Vol I, footnote 17, page 296, in the story The Adventure of
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Sep 13 4:06 PM
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                                      In Leslie S. Klinger's magnificent The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, W. W. Norton, New York, 2005, Vol I, footnote 17, page 296, in the story The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor which mentions St. George's Church in Hanover Square, London:
                                       
                                      "Designed and built by John James in 1721-1724, its  interior restored by Sir Arthur Blomfield in 1894, the Anglican St. Geroge's was 'the most famous church in London for fashionable weddings.' according to Baedeker.  Nineteenth-century weddings held here included those of Percy Bysshe Shelley (1814), Benjamin Disraeli (1839), George Meredith (1844), George Eliot (1880), and Theodore Roosevelt (1886).
                                    • Tweed Roosevelt
                                      Dimensional Data, a South African company reselling network infrastructure packages to corporations around the world in its weekly newsletter dated Dec. 23,
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Dec 28, 2005
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                                        Dimensional Data, a South African company reselling network infrastructure
                                        packages to corporations around the world in its weekly newsletter dated
                                        Dec. 23, 2005:

                                        Last week�s quick question was :
                                        Which American President barred the Christmas Tree from being displayed in
                                        the White House?
                                        - Teddy Roosevelt
                                        - George W Bush
                                        - Woodrow Wilson
                                        - Franklin D Roosevelt

                                        The correct answer is Teddy Roosevelt.
                                      • Emma Lathan
                                        I can honestly say that I did not know that and am interested in the why ?
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Dec 28, 2005
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                                          I can honestly say that I did not know that and am interested in the "why"?

                                          On 12/28/05, Tweed Roosevelt <tweedr@...> wrote:


                                          Dimensional Data, a South African company reselling network infrastructure
                                          packages to corporations around the world in its weekly newsletter dated
                                          Dec. 23, 2005:

                                          Last week's quick question was :
                                          Which American President barred the Christmas Tree from being displayed in
                                          the White House?
                                          - Teddy Roosevelt
                                          - George W Bush
                                          - Woodrow Wilson
                                          - Franklin D Roosevelt

                                          The correct answer is Teddy Roosevelt.




                                          --
                                          "When we started skating, we had no role models in Poland to follow, we just had a wish."
                                          -- Zagorska and Siudek, 1999 World Bronze medalist-figure skating pair from Poland
                                          Always remember Ferengi Rule of Acquisition Number 76: Every once in a while, declare peace. It confuses the hell out of your enemies."  
                                          - Quark (Deep Space Nine)  
                                          "I had forgotten that men could not see unicorns. Just because they cannot see them does not mean they do not exist."  
                                          - The Unicorn  (The Last Unicorn)  
                                          "Sometimes I think the universe just waits for me to get cocky."  
                                          - Egon (The Real Ghostbusters cartoon)  
                                          "A man is as happy as he makes up his mind to be."  
                                          - Abraham Lincoln  
                                          "Please try to understand before one of us dies..."  
                                          - John Cleese as Basil Fawlty
                                          "Killing you is on our to do list. Please be polite and wait your turn. "
                                          - The Game Operation Division
                                          "I'm not going there to die. I just need to know if I was ever really alive."  
                                          - Spike (Cowboy Bebop)
                                        • RoginaJ@cs.com
                                          Can anyone verify this? In a message dated 12/28/2005 5:12:18 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Can anyone verify this? In a message dated 12/28/2005 5:12:18 PM
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Jan 1, 2006
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                                            Can anyone verify this?

                                            In a message dated 12/28/2005 5:12:18 PM Eastern Standard Time, tweedr@... writes:

                                            Dimensional Data, a South African company reselling network infrastructure
                                            packages to corporations around the world in its weekly newsletter dated
                                            Dec. 23, 2005:

                                            Last week’s quick question was :
                                            Which American President barred the Christmas Tree from being displayed in
                                            the White House?
                                            - Teddy Roosevelt
                                            - George W Bush
                                            - Woodrow Wilson
                                            - Franklin D Roosevelt

                                            The correct answer is Teddy Roosevelt.

                                          • George Behe
                                            ... displayed in ... I tried posting a reply the other day, but my posting seems to have gone astray somewhere down the line. I don t know if TR literally
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Jan 3, 2006
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                                              > Can anyone verify this?
                                              > > Which American President barred the Christmas Tree from being
                                              displayed in
                                              > > the White House?
                                              > > The correct answer is Teddy Roosevelt.

                                              I tried posting a reply the other day, but my posting seems to have
                                              gone astray somewhere down the line.

                                              I don't know if TR literally *banned* Christmas trees in the White
                                              House, but according to the Dallas Morning News there was no
                                              Christmas tree in the White House during Christmas of 1902.

                                              In 1903 there was no *family* Christmas tree in the White House, but
                                              Archie Roosevelt set up his own little tree in the sewing room.

                                              I'm afraid I don't know what occurred in subsequent years, though.

                                              All my best,

                                              George Behe
                                            • Linda A. Shookster
                                              Hi George, Happy New Year, BTW! Was there any reason given why TR was banning Christmas Trees? Thanks, Linda Visit nineteenth century New York by viewing my
                                              Message 22 of 28 , Jan 3, 2006
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                                                Hi George,

                                                Happy New Year, BTW! Was there any reason given why TR was banning
                                                Christmas Trees?

                                                Thanks, Linda

                                                Visit nineteenth century New York by viewing my blog:

                                                http://oldnewyork.blogspot.com

                                                Laterally dated periodically!

                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > > Can anyone verify this?
                                                > > > Which American President barred the Christmas Tree from being
                                                > displayed in
                                                > > > the White House?
                                                > > > The correct answer is Teddy Roosevelt.
                                                >
                                                > I tried posting a reply the other day, but my posting seems to have
                                                > gone astray somewhere down the line.
                                                >
                                                > I don't know if TR literally *banned* Christmas trees in the White
                                                > House, but according to the Dallas Morning News there was no
                                                > Christmas tree in the White House during Christmas of 1902. 
                                                >
                                                > In 1903 there was no *family* Christmas tree in the White House, but
                                                > Archie Roosevelt set up his own little tree in the sewing room.
                                                >
                                                > I'm afraid I don't know what occurred in subsequent years, though.
                                                >
                                                > All my best,
                                                >
                                                > George Behe
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
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                                                >  Visit your group "tr-m" on the web. 
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                                              • George Behe
                                                Hi, Linda. Thanks for your kind New Year s greeting. I hope you and your family will have a terrific 2006 as well. ... I m afraid not. The newspaper merely
                                                Message 23 of 28 , Jan 3, 2006
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                                                  Hi, Linda.

                                                  Thanks for your kind New Year's greeting. I hope you and your
                                                  family will have a terrific 2006 as well.

                                                  > Was there any reason given why TR was banning
                                                  > Christmas Trees?

                                                  I'm afraid not. The newspaper merely mentioned the absence of
                                                  Christmas trees in 1902 and 1903 during the course of its general
                                                  description of how the Roosevelt's spent Christmas Day.

                                                  (Just as a speculative aside, do you suppose TR might have regarded
                                                  the seasonal destruction of pine trees as a waste of the country's
                                                  natural resources?)

                                                  All my best,

                                                  George
                                                • prosperena
                                                  Regarding TR s banning of Christmas trees in the White House... The same trivia question appeared a couple of weeks ago in the online Martha Stewart
                                                  Message 24 of 28 , Jan 4, 2006
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                                                    Regarding TR's banning of Christmas trees in the White House...  The same "trivia question" appeared a couple of weeks ago in the online "Martha Stewart Newsletter."  This is the answer according to that website: "Theodore Roosevelt prohibited Christmas trees in the White House for fear of undermining his forest-conservation efforts."  A similar posting appears at: http://www.bugwood.org/christmas/BHHTT.html: "Theodore Roosevelt decided for the sake of forest conservation that the White House would not have a tree. His two sons snuck a small tree into their room and were caught, to the embarrassment of their father."  And here: http://www.clover.okstate.edu/fourh/aitc/lessons/extras/facts/cmastree.html
                                                    "President Theodore Roosevelt - known for his campaign for the conservation of natural resources - banned the use of such trees for White House festivities. Shortly afterward he discovered that two of his sons had smuggled a tree into the mansion and set it up in their room. The boys appealed to their father's good friend, Gifford Pinchot, 'America's first professional forester.' Pinchot convinced the president that if young evergreens were properly cut, it was helpful rather than harmful."
                                                    Neither site cites its sources but they seem fairly reliable.  Perhaps someone can find definitive information in one of the (unnamed) boys correspondence...?
                                                    --Kari E. Johnson
                                                    Los Angeles, CA
                                                  • Scott E
                                                    A bit ironic perhaps that Martha Stewart is also the name of TR s maternal grandmother!!! Scott ...
                                                    Message 25 of 28 , Jan 4, 2006
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                                                      A bit ironic perhaps that "Martha Stewart" is also the name of TR's maternal
                                                      grandmother!!!
                                                      Scott


                                                      >From: "prosperena" <kejohnson@...>
                                                      >Reply-To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
                                                      >To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
                                                      >Subject: [tr-m] RE: He is everywhere thread
                                                      >Date: Thu, 05 Jan 2006 00:10:18 -0000
                                                      >
                                                      >Regarding TR's banning of Christmas trees in the White House... The same
                                                      >"trivia question" appeared a couple of weeks ago in the online "Martha
                                                      >Stewart Newsletter." This is the answer according to that website:
                                                      >"Theodore Roosevelt prohibited Christmas trees in the White House for fear
                                                      >of undermining his forest-conservation efforts." A similar posting appears
                                                      >at: http://www.bugwood.org/christmas/BHHTT.html: "Theodore Roosevelt
                                                      >decided for the sake of forest conservation that the White House would not
                                                      >have a tree. His two sons snuck a small tree into their room and were
                                                      >caught, to the embarrassment of their father." And here:
                                                      >http://www.clover.okstate.edu/fourh/aitc/lessons/extras/facts/cmastree.html
                                                      >"President Theodore Roosevelt - known for his campaign for the conservation
                                                      >of natural resources - banned the use of such trees for White House
                                                      >festivities. Shortly afterward he discovered that two of his sons had
                                                      >smuggled a tree into the mansion and set it up in their room. The boys
                                                      >appealed to their father's good friend, Gifford Pinchot, 'America's first
                                                      >professional forester.' Pinchot convinced the president that if young
                                                      >evergreens were properly cut, it was helpful rather than harmful."
                                                      >Neither site cites its sources but they seem fairly reliable. Perhaps
                                                      >someone can find definitive information in one of the (unnamed) boys
                                                      >correspondence...?
                                                      >--Kari E. Johnson
                                                      >Los Angeles, CA
                                                      >

                                                      _________________________________________________________________
                                                      Don�t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search!
                                                      http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/
                                                    • Arnie Talgo
                                                      Here is some info from the web- ARNIE See http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/O_Tannenbaum/12b-The_White_House_Ch ristmas_Trees.htm Excerpts-
                                                      Message 26 of 28 , Jan 5, 2006
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                                                        Here is some info from the web—

                                                        ARNIE

                                                        See

                                                        http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/O_Tannenbaum/12b-The_White_House_Christmas_Trees.htm

                                                        Excerpts—

                                                        Victorian-Era Christmas Tree SceneThere was almost a break in the tradition during the tenure of President Theodore Roosevelt. The story is that in 1902 the president, an ardent conservationist, forbad his children to have a Christmas tree on the grounds that it would undermine his conservation program [1] ; often, the children in question are identified as Archie and Quentin. [2] Roosevelt is reported to have said "It's not good to cut down trees for mere decoration. We must set a good example for the people of America ." However when the matter was broached with Gifford Pinchot, a cabinet member and founder of the Yale School of Forestry, the President relented. Pinchot assured the President that thinning the forest by cutting down Christmas trees actually helped the forest thrive. It is reported that after this episode, the Roosevelts had a small tree each year.

                                                        Roosevelt, in a letter to Master James A. Garfield, dated December 26, 1902, wrote:

                                                        Yesterday morning at a quarter of seven all the children were up and dressed and began to hammer at the door of their mother's and my room, in which their six stockings, all bulging out with queer angles and rotundities, were hanging from the fireplace. So their mother and I got up, shut the window, lit the fire, taking down the stockings, of course, put on our wrappers and prepared to admit the children. But first there was a surprise for me, also for their good mother, for Archie had a little Christmas tree of his own which he had rigged up with the help of one of the carpenters in a big closet; and we all had to look at the tree and each of us got a present off of it. [Emphasis added.] There was also one present each for Jack the dog, Tom Quartz the kitten, and Algonquin the pony, whom Archie would no more think of neglecting than I would neglect his brothers and sisters. Then all the children came into our bed and there they opened their stockings. Afterwards we got dressed and took breakfast, and then all went into the library, where each child had a table set for his bigger presents. Quentin had a perfectly delightful electric railroad, which had been rigged up for him by one of his friends, the White House electrician, who has been very good to all the children. [3]

                                                        In a letter to his sister, Mrs. Douglas Robinson, Dec. 26, 1903, President Roosevelt wrote:

                                                        We had a delightful Christmas yesterday—just such a Christmas thirty or forty years ago we used to have under Father's and Mother's supervision in 20th street and 57th street .

                                                        At seven all the children came in to open the big, bulgy stockings in our bed; Kermit's terrier, Allan, a most friendly little dog, adding to the children's delight by occupying the middle of the bed. From Alice to Quentin, each child was absorbed in his or her stocking, and Edith certainly managed to get the most wonderful stocking toys. Bob was in looking on, and Aunt Emily, of course.

                                                        Then, after breakfast, we all formed up and went into the library, where bigger toys were on separate tables for the children. I wonder whether there ever can come in life a thrill of greater exaltation and rapture than that which comes to one between the ages of say six and fourteen, when the library door is thrown open and you walk in to see all the gifts, like a materialized fairy land, arrayed on your special table? [4]

                                                        Roosevelt wasn’t against Christmas, however, in two works published in 1913, he wrote about Christmas customs observed by the Roosevelt family.

                                                        In ["The Yale Book of American Verse’s"] the anthology of hymns, for instance, besides all the great hymns, from Bernard of Morlais to Cowper and Wesley and Bishop Heber, I would like to put in some hymns as to which I know nothing except that I like them. Every Christmas Eve in our own church at Oyster Bay , for instance, the children sing a hymn beginning "Its Christmas Eve on the River, its Christmas Eve on the Bay." Of course the hymn has come to us from somewhere else, but I do not know from where; and the average native of our village firmly believes that it is indigenous to our own soil—which it can not be, unless it deals in hyperbole, for the nearest approach to a river in our neighborhood is the village pond. [5]

                                                         


                                                        From: tr-m@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tr-m@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of prosperena
                                                        Sent: Wednesday, January 04, 2006 7:10 PM
                                                        To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
                                                        Subject: [tr-m] RE: He is everywhere thread

                                                         

                                                        Regarding TR's banning of Christmas trees in the White House...  The same "trivia question" appeared a couple of weeks ago in the online "Martha Stewart Newsletter."  This is the answer according to that website: "Theodore Roosevelt prohibited Christmas trees in the White House for fear of undermining his forest-conservation efforts."  A similar posting appears at: http://www.bugwood.org/christmas/BHHTT.html: "Theodore Roosevelt decided for the sake of forest conservation that the White House would not have a tree. His two sons snuck a small tree into their room and were caught, to the embarrassment of their father."  And here: http://www.clover.okstate.edu/fourh/aitc/lessons/extras/facts/cmastree.html
                                                        "President Theodore Roosevelt - known for his campaign for the con servation of natural resources - banned the use of such trees for White House festivities. Shortly afterward he discovered that two of his sons had smuggled a tree into the mansion and set it up in their room. The boys appealed to their father's good friend, Gifford Pinchot, ' America 's first professional forester.' Pinchot convinced the president that if young evergreens were properly cut, it was helpful rather than harmful."
                                                        Neither site cites its sources but they seem fairly reliable.  Perhaps someone can find definitive information in one of the (unnamed) boys correspondence...?
                                                        --Kari E. Johnson
                                                        Los Angeles , CA

                                                      • James M Gallen
                                                        The Gerald R. Ford Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan is hosting an exhibit on Theodore Roosevelt. The website can be found at:
                                                        Message 27 of 28 , Jan 10, 2006
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                                                          The Gerald R. Ford Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan is hosting an exhibit
                                                          on Theodore Roosevelt. The website can be found at:

                                                          http://www.ford.utexas.edu/MUSEUM/exhibits/TR/enter%20website.htm

                                                          Jim Gallen
                                                        • James M Gallen
                                                          Doug Mishler did make a very energetic and enthusiastic portrayal of TR at the Kirkwood Chautauqua on June 6. He was very well received. After the portrayal
                                                          Message 28 of 28 , Jun 8, 2006
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                                                            Doug Mishler did make a very energetic and enthusiastic portrayal of TR
                                                            at the Kirkwood Chautauqua on June 6. He was very well received. After
                                                            the portrayal he removed his costume and talked and answered questions.

                                                            During the rest of the week he will give other lectures around the area
                                                            on TR as Conservationist and TR as Adventurer.

                                                            Jim Gallen
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