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Re: Contribution to "he is everywhere" thread

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  • navhist1
    While I agree that TR sought to bring Jones home to give the Navy an icon, I believe Roosevelt s reasoning had much to do with the impact Jone s example had on
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 3, 2003
      While I agree that TR sought to bring Jones home to give the Navy an
      icon, I believe Roosevelt's reasoning had much to do with the impact
      Jone's example had on the generation that immeadiately followed his,
      which TR was intimately aware of. The Revolution was an
      embarrassment for the Colonial Navy, with much of it bottled up in
      port, only a few ships were able to slip out and have much of an
      impact, Jone's Providence and Bon Homme Richard were notable among
      them. It was this example that served as a touchstone for the
      successful naval commanders of the War of 1812, that did so much to
      establish the standards and traditions of today. While Jones on the
      surface looks great, a close examination brings out appalling
      character faults. He was the most human of heroes, but in the moment
      of crises, he maintained his head, and our nation's honor.
      Jerry

      --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, "John A. Gable" <TRA_Gable@s...> wrote:
      > What is meant is that President Theodore Roosevelt had the body of
      John Paul Jones returned to the US from France in 1906 and re-buried
      in a most impressive tomb in the crypt of the Chapel at Annapolis.
      Jones died in France and was buried in a Protestant cemetery, which
      was later covered over by the construction of buildings. It was quite
      a job to find the body. Then the body was brought back by the Navy
      with great pomp and circumstance. TR did this to give the Navy a
      major historical icon, whereas of course the Navy during the
      Revolution,in Jones's day, did not amount to much. It was the French
      Navy that fought for us on the high seas in the Revolution.
      > John Gable
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Tweed Roosevelt
      > To: TRA
      > Sent: Sunday, June 01, 2003 8:51 AM
      > Subject: [tr-m] Contribution to "he is everywhere" thread
      >
      >
      > In this week's The New Yorker (June 2, 2003, page 94) is a review
      of a new book, John Paul Jones, by Evan Thomas:
      >
      > "The (John Paul) Jones revered today is, as Thomas explains,
      largely the creation of Theodore Roosevelt, who wanted a role model
      for the Navy's officer corps."
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    • KDalt@aol.com
      On an scholarly list-serv related to the Progressive Era people are asking about TR and gambling. I can refer them to my book and TR s letters. Does anyone
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 4, 2003
        On an scholarly list-serv related to the Progressive Era people are asking about TR and gambling. I can refer them to my book and TR's letters. Does anyone know of a specialized study on TR and gambling? Or any information floating around in the TR family or TRA world? Other than his remarks teasing the anti-gambling investigator Charles Evans Hughes (and he had other important jobs, NY governor, later Supreme Court justice, ran for president in 1916)? I know TR made comments about stock speculation being like gambling, but I don't know if TR ever supported the several anti-gambling movements popular in his day.

        John Gable--encyclopedia that you are--can you advise?
        Thanks-

        Kathleen Dalton
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