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RE: [tr-m] Re: Bishop / Corinne question re-stated error

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  • Linda E. Milano
    Actually, there were plans to form a TR Presidential Library. It was under consideration by the Roosevelt Memorial Association (RMA - later renamed the
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 9, 2011
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      Actually, there were plans to form a TR Presidential Library.  It was under consideration by the Roosevelt Memorial Association (RMA - later renamed the Theodore Roosevelt Association when it merged with the Womens Roosevelt Memorial Association - WRMA).  The original plan was to turn Sagamore Hill into a presidential library.  However, Edith Kermit Roosevelt refused to move - she said it was still her home.  The RMA continued to collected books, letters,  photos, ephemera, etc. in hopes that they would be able to found the library some day.  In the meantime, the WRMA rebuilt TR's birthplace in Manhattan.  Many people donated things there, and their museum rooms have a wonderful collection.  In the 1940s, while Edith was still residing at Sagamore Hill, the RMA gave their collection to the Houghton Library at Harvard so that people would have access.  About 12 years ago, I gave some representatives of the National Archives a tour of Sagamore Hill.  They questioned why TR didn't have a presidential library of his own.  I told them the same thing.

       

      Best,

      Linda

       

      From: tr-m@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tr-m@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of kuniegel@...
      Sent: Friday, December 09, 2011 10:33 AM
      To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [tr-m] Re: Bishop / Corinne question re-stated error

       

       

      Many thanks, this nails it, Bishop stays completely accurate from my perspective. I did read Archibald Butt’s book a number of years ago and the passage you quote now rings a bell. I would like to read the trilogy someday but I fear that I would become confused about if I read things in the books that I have on the web site (which are out of copy write) and start searching for material, which is included in more modern books. Father time has a way of creeping up on ones ability to recollect. Archibald Butt’s book is still copy write protected so I did not purchase it for web site production.

       

      My hope is that I can sell people on a Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library where perhaps other books could be included with  usage privileges for searches (this would even spur hard copy sales of books). The possibilities are vast. If any ex-president should have a Presidential Library TR should, for all the obvious reasons to anyone that has studied him.

       

      On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.

      This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.

       

      (Bishop) 

      On the morning of the day, July 17, 1918, on which he was to make his address, word reached him that his son Quentin, an aviator in the army at the front in France, had been killed in an aerial battle.

       

      ----- Original Message -----

      From: George

      Sent: Thursday, December 08, 2011 6:23 PM

      Subject: [tr-m] Re: Bishop / Corinne question re-stated error

       

       

      On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.

      This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.

    • Linda E. Milano
      Actually, when TR died there was also a push to build a TR monument in the Mall in DC. The area set aside was used for the Jefferson Memorial instead. So the
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 9, 2011
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        Actually, when TR died there was also a push to build a TR monument in the Mall in DC.  The area set aside was used for the Jefferson Memorial instead.  So the RMA bought Analostan Island and renamed it Roosevelt Island.

         

        The problem with creating a TR Presidential Library at this point is that most of the books, etc. are at Harvard, the Birthpace, Sagamore Hill, and Dickinson State University.  The TRA still owns some of the items at Harvard and Sagamore Hill, and there are a few things at Sagamore Hill that still belong to family members…

         

        Best,

        Linda

         

        From: tr-m@yahoogroups.com [mailto:tr-m@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of SimonATL
        Sent: Friday, December 09, 2011 1:52 PM
        To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [tr-m] Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library Question...

         

         

        Kuniegel

        The Theodore Roosevelt Association seriously looked into the idea of a TR Presidential Libary, but decided against going ahead with the project.

        I think the proposed location, Oyster Bay was way too out of the way for public access. I agree that it would be a great idea. I think the best place for that library would either be down near his birthplace in Manhattan or in DC near the Mall area as would be a monument. The current monument on Roosevelt Island near DC, while wonderful is just not visible to the public visiting DC.

        I visited DC a hundred times while in the US Marine Corps but never even heard of Roosevelt Island, myself.

        Keith

        --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, <kuniegel@...> wrote:
        >
        > Many thanks, this nails it, Bishop stays completely accurate from my perspective. I did read Archibald Butt's book a number of years ago and the passage you quote now rings a bell. I would like to read the trilogy someday but I fear that I would become confused about if I read things in the books that I have on the web site (which are out of copy write) and start searching for material, which is included in more modern books. Father time has a way of creeping up on ones ability to recollect. Archibald Butt's book is still copy write protected so I did not purchase it for web site production.
        >
        > My hope is that I can sell people on a Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library where perhaps other books could be included with usage privileges for searches (this would even spur hard copy sales of books). The possibilities are vast. If any ex-president should have a Presidential Library TR should, for all the obvious reasons to anyone that has studied him.
        >
        > On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.
        >
        > This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.
        >
        >
        >
        > (Bishop)
        >
        > On the morning of the day, July 17, 1918, on which he was to make his address, word reached him that his son Quentin, an aviator in the army at the front in France, had been killed in an aerial battle.
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: George
        > To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Thursday, December 08, 2011 6:23 PM
        > Subject: [tr-m] Re: Bishop / Corinne question re-stated error
        >
        >
        >
        > On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.
        >
        > This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.
        >

      • kuniegel@verizon.net
        Perhaps the idea has been considered looking at how libraries have been constructed in the past. One could put everything TR wrote, everything which is in his
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 9, 2011
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          Perhaps the idea has been considered looking at how libraries have been constructed in the past. One could put everything TR wrote, everything which is in his personal library, all the books out of copyright that have been written about him, everything he read that is not in his personal collection on a hard drive and place it just about anywhere. I do not believe he was big on marble and stone monuments he was more interested in practical application.  The dawn of the Information Age is upon us and anyone that would wish to read one of his books would have an opportunity through the use of the Internet. I am a dreamer, but I never had a larger dream of something that could be done, which needs to be done. It would take some great minds to lay the groundwork and some average people with an interest to make it happen. I am an average person without the ability to make it happen but perhaps my ability is merely to plant the seed. I truly believe that TR's greatest gift to this country could be in the future if new generations are introduced to how he accomplished so much using honesty.
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: SimonATL
          Sent: Friday, December 09, 2011 1:51 PM
          Subject: [tr-m] Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library Question...

           

          Kuniegel

          The Theodore Roosevelt Association seriously looked into the idea of a TR Presidential Libary, but decided against going ahead with the project.

          I think the proposed location, Oyster Bay was way too out of the way for public access. I agree that it would be a great idea. I think the best place for that library would either be down near his birthplace in Manhattan or in DC near the Mall area as would be a monument. The current monument on Roosevelt Island near DC, while wonderful is just not visible to the public visiting DC.

          I visited DC a hundred times while in the US Marine Corps but never even heard of Roosevelt Island, myself.

          Keith

          --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, <kuniegel@...> wrote:
          >
          > Many thanks, this nails it, Bishop stays completely accurate from my perspective. I did read Archibald Butt's book a number of years ago and the passage you quote now rings a bell. I would like to read the trilogy someday but I fear that I would become confused about if I read things in the books that I have on the web site (which are out of copy write) and start searching for material, which is included in more modern books. Father time has a way of creeping up on ones ability to recollect. Archibald Butt's book is still copy write protected so I did not purchase it for web site production.
          >
          > My hope is that I can sell people on a Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library where perhaps other books could be included with usage privileges for searches (this would even spur hard copy sales of books). The possibilities are vast. If any ex-president should have a Presidential Library TR should, for all the obvious reasons to anyone that has studied him.
          >
          > On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.
          >
          > This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.
          >
          >
          >
          > (Bishop)
          >
          > On the morning of the day, July 17, 1918, on which he was to make his address, word reached him that his son Quentin, an aviator in the army at the front in France, had been killed in an aerial battle.
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: George
          > To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Thursday, December 08, 2011 6:23 PM
          > Subject: [tr-m] Re: Bishop / Corinne question re-stated error
          >
          >
          >
          > On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.
          >
          > This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.
          >

        • Linda E. Milano
          Harvard is digitizing a lot of what they have. Dickinson State University is doing a big digitization project on items they got from the TRA. When Edith
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 10, 2011
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            Harvard is digitizing a lot of what they have.  Dickinson State University is doing a big digitization project on items they got from the TRA.

            When Edith Roosevelt died, she assigned the copyright for all his books to the TRA. Those copyrights have been expiring.

            There is a lot on line right now. Most of his presidential correspondence is at the National Archives in Washington.  Having better access to that would only be throw through a physical presidential library.

            Linda

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Dec 9, 2011, at 11:16 PM, <kuniegel@...> wrote:

             

            Perhaps the idea has been considered looking at how libraries have been constructed in the past. One could put everything TR wrote, everything which is in his personal library, all the books out of copyright that have been written about him, everything he read that is not in his personal collection on a hard drive and place it just about anywhere. I do not believe he was big on marble and stone monuments he was more interested in practical application.  The dawn of the Information Age is upon us and anyone that would wish to read one of his books would have an opportunity through the use of the Internet. I am a dreamer, but I never had a larger dream of something that could be done, which needs to be done. It would take some great minds to lay the groundwork and some average people with an interest to make it happen. I am an average person without the ability to make it happen but perhaps my ability is merely to plant the seed. I truly believe that TR's greatest gift to this country could be in the future if new generations are introduced to how he accomplished so much using honesty.
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: SimonATL
            Sent: Friday, December 09, 2011 1:51 PM
            Subject: [tr-m] Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library Question...

             

            Kuniegel

            The Theodore Roosevelt Association seriously looked into the idea of a TR Presidential Libary, but decided against going ahead with the project.

            I think the proposed location, Oyster Bay was way too out of the way for public access. I agree that it would be a great idea. I think the best place for that library would either be down near his birthplace in Manhattan or in DC near the Mall area as would be a monument. The current monument on Roosevelt Island near DC, while wonderful is just not visible to the public visiting DC.

            I visited DC a hundred times while in the US Marine Corps but never even heard of Roosevelt Island, myself.

            Keith

            --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, <kuniegel@...> wrote:
            >
            > Many thanks, this nails it, Bishop stays completely accurate from my perspective. I did read Archibald Butt's book a number of years ago and the passage you quote now rings a bell. I would like to read the trilogy someday but I fear that I would become confused about if I read things in the books that I have on the web site (which are out of copy write) and start searching for material, which is included in more modern books. Father time has a way of creeping up on ones ability to recollect. Archibald Butt's book is still copy write protected so I did not purchase it for web site production.
            >
            > My hope is that I can sell people on a Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library where perhaps other books could be included with usage privileges for searches (this would even spur hard copy sales of books). The possibilities are vast. If any ex-president should have a Presidential Library TR should, for all the obvious reasons to anyone that has studied him.
            >
            > On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.
            >
            > This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.
            >
            >
            >
            > (Bishop)
            >
            > On the morning of the day, July 17, 1918, on which he was to make his address, word reached him that his son Quentin, an aviator in the army at the front in France, had been killed in an aerial battle.
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: George
            > To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Thursday, December 08, 2011 6:23 PM
            > Subject: [tr-m] Re: Bishop / Corinne question re-stated error
            >
            >
            >
            > On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.
            >
            > This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.
            >

          • kuniegel@verizon.net
            I only wish I had TR s ability to explain the benefit to average Junior High School students & public at large that the undertaking of making these
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 11, 2011
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              I only wish I had TR's ability to explain the benefit to average Junior High School students & public at large that the undertaking of making these digitization’s that are scatter about in various places user friendly. Plus have them located on one web site. I will continue to add books to my TRAmericanPatriot.com library in user-friendly formats with the hope that perhaps someday someone of influence will notice the concept that can make it possible to put TR in homes across the country. Unfortunately people are only attracted to things when they have a buzz quality. Excuse the salon lingo that is an industry that I have been involved in for almost 30 years. How to create a buzz about something new is key to success in the salon industry. You can always have a big advertisement campaign but the best buzz creation needs to foster word of mouth advertisement. In my next book description for "The Last of the Mohicans" I make a more reasoned case for what I am seeking. It may be that I am wrong, my other hero Socrates, says we should never be so sure of anything that we close our minds. I respect your position and know that you are dedicated to TRA. Any persistence on my part to promote the user-friendly concept and public involvement I hope will not be viewed as disrespect. Being a student of Socrates (who many do not understand today) I sort of do what Theodore Roosevelt III says his father does.

               

              “Toward the winter of 1917 father talked ever increasingly to all of us concerning his chance of being permitted to take a division or unit of some sort to Europe.  When war was declared he took this matter up directly with the President.  What happened is now history.  He took his disappointment as he took many other disappointments in his life.  Often after he had worked with all that was in him for something, when all that could be done was done, he would say, "We have done all we can; the result is now on the knees of the gods."”

              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Saturday, December 10, 2011 11:41 AM
              Subject: Re: [tr-m] Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library Question...

               

              Harvard is digitizing a lot of what they have.  Dickinson State University is doing a big digitization project on items they got from the TRA.

              When Edith Roosevelt died, she assigned the copyright for all his books to the TRA. Those copyrights have been expiring.

              There is a lot on line right now. Most of his presidential correspondence is at the National Archives in Washington.  Having better access to that would only be throw through a physical presidential library.

              Linda

              Sent from my iPhone

              On Dec 9, 2011, at 11:16 PM, <kuniegel@...> wrote:

               

              Perhaps the idea has been considered looking at how libraries have been constructed in the past. One could put everything TR wrote, everything which is in his personal library, all the books out of copyright that have been written about him, everything he read that is not in his personal collection on a hard drive and place it just about anywhere. I do not believe he was big on marble and stone monuments he was more interested in practical application.  The dawn of the Information Age is upon us and anyone that would wish to read one of his books would have an opportunity through the use of the Internet. I am a dreamer, but I never had a larger dream of something that could be done, which needs to be done. It would take some great minds to lay the groundwork and some average people with an interest to make it happen. I am an average person without the ability to make it happen but perhaps my ability is merely to plant the seed. I truly believe that TR's greatest gift to this country could be in the future if new generations are introduced to how he accomplished so much using honesty.
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: SimonATL
              Sent: Friday, December 09, 2011 1:51 PM
              Subject: [tr-m] Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library Question...

               

              Kuniegel

              The Theodore Roosevelt Association seriously looked into the idea of a TR Presidential Libary, but decided against going ahead with the project.

              I think the proposed location, Oyster Bay was way too out of the way for public access. I agree that it would be a great idea. I think the best place for that library would either be down near his birthplace in Manhattan or in DC near the Mall area as would be a monument. The current monument on Roosevelt Island near DC, while wonderful is just not visible to the public visiting DC.

              I visited DC a hundred times while in the US Marine Corps but never even heard of Roosevelt Island, myself.

              Keith

              --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, <kuniegel@...> wrote:
              >
              > Many thanks, this nails it, Bishop stays completely accurate from my perspective. I did read Archibald Butt's book a number of years ago and the passage you quote now rings a bell. I would like to read the trilogy someday but I fear that I would become confused about if I read things in the books that I have on the web site (which are out of copy write) and start searching for material, which is included in more modern books. Father time has a way of creeping up on ones ability to recollect. Archibald Butt's book is still copy write protected so I did not purchase it for web site production.
              >
              > My hope is that I can sell people on a Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library where perhaps other books could be included with usage privileges for searches (this would even spur hard copy sales of books). The possibilities are vast. If any ex-president should have a Presidential Library TR should, for all the obvious reasons to anyone that has studied him.
              >
              > On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.
              >
              > This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.
              >
              >
              >
              > (Bishop)
              >
              > On the morning of the day, July 17, 1918, on which he was to make his address, word reached him that his son Quentin, an aviator in the army at the front in France, had been killed in an aerial battle.
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: George
              > To: tr-m@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Thursday, December 08, 2011 6:23 PM
              > Subject: [tr-m] Re: Bishop / Corinne question re-stated error
              >
              >
              >
              > On the night of July 16, 1918 TR learned of a press cable instructing reporters to "Watch Sagamore Hill in event of ____." (The remainder of the message was censored by wartime censors.) TR had an ominous foreboding that the message concerned Quentin, and his presentiment was confirmed the following day when a dispatch from Paris announced Quentin's death three days earlier.
              >
              > This information comes from volume 3 of my trilogy "'Archie': The Life of Major Archibald Butt from Georgia to the Titanic.
              >

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