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Questions to Chip Bishop on his upcoming Book on JB Bishop

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  • SimonATL
    Chip I ve heard some great things about your new book on TR s friend and sometime publicist, Joseph Bucklin Bishop, The Lion and the Journalis. Their
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 16, 2011
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      Chip

      I've heard some great things about your new book on TR's friend and sometime publicist, Joseph Bucklin Bishop, "The Lion and the Journalis." Their friendship was truely extraordinary and your great-great uncle enjoyed TR's complete and even special confidence.

      I wanted to ask you a few questions about the book

      Who was Joseph Bucklin Bishop, and why does he matter both in his own right as well as within the context of the life and times of the 26th President?
      What's this book about?
      What new light does it shed on TR?
      Bishop was TR's authorized biographer. How did that come about?
      Some historians have accused Bishop of being a TR sycophant. True or not?

      Looking forward to your thoughts.

      Keith Simon
      Moderator
      Trustee, Theodore Roosevelt Association
    • kuniegel@verizon.net
      Great questions I will be looking forwards to Chip s reply. My first understanding about TR was Joseph Bucklin Bishop s Theodore Roosevelt and His Time . I
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 19, 2011
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        Great questions I will be looking forwards to Chip's reply. My first understanding about TR was Joseph Bucklin Bishop's "Theodore Roosevelt and His Time". I always turn to it when there is a question of accuracy in another book. In fact when I get rolling on promoting TR as a role model his work will play a central part,.
         
        Thanks again Major for you kind words and your dedication. RJK
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: SimonATL
        Sent: Saturday, September 17, 2011 2:38 AM
        Subject: [tr-m] Questions to Chip Bishop on his upcoming Book on JB Bishop

         

        Chip

        I've heard some great things about your new book on TR's friend and sometime publicist, Joseph Bucklin Bishop, "The Lion and the Journalis." Their friendship was truely extraordinary and your great-great uncle enjoyed TR's complete and even special confidence.

        I wanted to ask you a few questions about the book

        Who was Joseph Bucklin Bishop, and why does he matter both in his own right as well as within the context of the life and times of the 26th President?
        What's this book about?
        What new light does it shed on TR?
        Bishop was TR's authorized biographer. How did that come about?
        Some historians have accused Bishop of being a TR sycophant. True or not?

        Looking forward to your thoughts.

        Keith Simon
        Moderator
        Trustee, Theodore Roosevelt Association

      • chiponthecape
        ... Bishop, who was my great-granduncle, was an influential New York City newspaper editor from 1870-1905. He wrote editorials for the New York Tribune, The
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 20, 2011
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          --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, "SimonATL" <simonatl@...> wrote:
          >
          > Chip
          >
          > I've heard some great things about your new book on TR's friend and sometime publicist, Joseph Bucklin Bishop, "The Lion and the Journalis." Their friendship was truely extraordinary and your great-great uncle enjoyed TR's complete and even special confidence.
          >
          > I wanted to ask you a few questions about the book
          >
          > Who was Joseph Bucklin Bishop, and why does he matter both in his own right as well as within the context of the life and times of the 26th President?

          Bishop, who was my great-granduncle, was an influential New York City newspaper editor from 1870-1905. He wrote editorials for the New York Tribune, The Evening Post and Globe-Commercial Advertiser. He crusaded against political corruption and in favor of ths secret voting ballot.

          > What's this book about?

          My book is about the remarkable friendship Theodore Roosevelt maintained with Bishop over 25 years. He and Bishop often worked in tandem in one of the earliest collaborations of a president and a journalist. Later, Bishop became TR's "eyes and ears" in Panama during the construction of the Panama Canal and ultimately, he became TR's authorized biographer. They exchanged 600 letters during 1895-1918, and these form the basis of my tale.

          > What new light does it shed on TR?

          We see a new, fascinating side of TR, unexpectedly dependent on an influential friend for advice and counsel. Their letters are candid and frank. For instance, when TR left the presidency of the New York Police Commission in the late 1890s, he told Bishop that he fully expected that it would be the end of his political career because he had offended so many entrenched interests.

          > Bishop was TR's authorized biographer. How did that come about?

          In the last few years of his life, TR became increasingly concerned with his legacy and turned to Bishop to "tell my life story." He gave Bishop sole access to his archives at the Library of Congress including tens of thousands of letters. In entrusting Bishop with the responsibility, TR said, You know it [my life] almost as well as I do."

          > Some historians have accused Bishop of being a TR sycophant. True or not?

          Although Bishop usually supported Roosevelt's policies publicly and liked to schmooze with him, his family and aides, his editorial support was not always automatic. For example, they clashed over which side to support in the 1902 coal strike. Roosevelt, it seemed, never tired of his acquaintenace with Bishop, thanking him from time to time for telling him what he needed to hear, not what he wanted to hear.
          >
          > Looking forward to your thoughts.

          Thanks. I hope everyone enjoys the book once it publishes November 8. I welcome feedback.
          >
          > Keith Simon
          > Moderator
          > Trustee, Theodore Roosevelt Association
          >
        • SimonATL
          Chip Thanks for your replies to the questions I posed. I got to saw an advance copy of the book. So here are a few of my initial thoughts. I m sure that there
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 21, 2011
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            Chip

            Thanks for your replies to the questions I posed.

            I got to saw an advance copy of the book. So here are a few of my initial thoughts. I'm sure that there will be tons of reviews coming out.

            The Joseph Bucklin Biship book is an excellent study of both a developing life-long relationship of mutual trust as well as a study of how Theodore Roosevelt came to understand the power of the press and how he could use his frienships with powerful men in the media of his day to advance both his personal causes as well as his own career. If the reader wonders if just how close to TR, Bishop was, consider this. In the twilight of his life, as TR struggled with accumulation of injuries and diseases that would lead to his death in early 1919, he turned to but one man to tell the story of his life and leave TR's own interpretation of himself for future generations. That man was Joseph Bucklin Bishop. Theodore Roosevelt authorized Bishop, alone, to convey to future generations the entirety of his life, his purpose and indeed the grand heart and indomitable spirit of this lion of a man. That very fact sets Bishop in a unique category. Unlike Thomas Jefferson, who literally spent decades destroying personal letters that put him in an unfavable light and attempting to spin his own image for posterity, TR simply did not have the desire nor need for such manipulation. In very few areas did he try to re-intrepet himself. These areas would become subjects for debate by critics such as Henry Pringle who made a cottage industry of criticizing a deceased TR who could not defend himself. So getting the TR story right was uppermost with Roosevelt in the last years of his life. How Bishop (with TR's cooperation with the early chapters of his Roosevelt biography, also tells us precisely where TR wanted special emphasis placed. Those chapters are akin to Roosevelt's own autobiography, but they also tell us HOW TR wanted himSELF to been seen. The fact that he would entrust this to Bishop says it all. Bishop would help realize TR's Panama Canal dream by becoming TR's point man in Panama and later becoming a Panama mainstay and governing the progress of the entire project after TR's death for several years. A great read and a real inside look on the friendship of two Americans at the dawn of the Modern "American Age."

            Keith Simon
            Group Moderator
            Trustee, Theodore Roosevelt Association

            --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, "chiponthecape" <chip@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > --- In tr-m@yahoogroups.com, "SimonATL" <simonatl@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Chip
            > >
            > > I've heard some great things about your new book on TR's friend and sometime publicist, Joseph Bucklin Bishop, "The Lion and the Journalis." Their friendship was truely extraordinary and your great-great uncle enjoyed TR's complete and even special confidence.
            > >
            > > I wanted to ask you a few questions about the book
            > >
            > > Who was Joseph Bucklin Bishop, and why does he matter both in his own right as well as within the context of the life and times of the 26th President?
            >
            > Bishop, who was my great-granduncle, was an influential New York City newspaper editor from 1870-1905. He wrote editorials for the New York Tribune, The Evening Post and Globe-Commercial Advertiser. He crusaded against political corruption and in favor of ths secret voting ballot.
            >
            > > What's this book about?
            >
            > My book is about the remarkable friendship Theodore Roosevelt maintained with Bishop over 25 years. He and Bishop often worked in tandem in one of the earliest collaborations of a president and a journalist. Later, Bishop became TR's "eyes and ears" in Panama during the construction of the Panama Canal and ultimately, he became TR's authorized biographer. They exchanged 600 letters during 1895-1918, and these form the basis of my tale.
            >
            > > What new light does it shed on TR?
            >
            > We see a new, fascinating side of TR, unexpectedly dependent on an influential friend for advice and counsel. Their letters are candid and frank. For instance, when TR left the presidency of the New York Police Commission in the late 1890s, he told Bishop that he fully expected that it would be the end of his political career because he had offended so many entrenched interests.
            >
            > > Bishop was TR's authorized biographer. How did that come about?
            >
            > In the last few years of his life, TR became increasingly concerned with his legacy and turned to Bishop to "tell my life story." He gave Bishop sole access to his archives at the Library of Congress including tens of thousands of letters. In entrusting Bishop with the responsibility, TR said, You know it [my life] almost as well as I do."
            >
            > > Some historians have accused Bishop of being a TR sycophant. True or not?
            >
            > Although Bishop usually supported Roosevelt's policies publicly and liked to schmooze with him, his family and aides, his editorial support was not always automatic. For example, they clashed over which side to support in the 1902 coal strike. Roosevelt, it seemed, never tired of his acquaintenace with Bishop, thanking him from time to time for telling him what he needed to hear, not what he wanted to hear.
            > >
            > > Looking forward to your thoughts.
            >
            > Thanks. I hope everyone enjoys the book once it publishes November 8. I welcome feedback.
            > >
            > > Keith Simon
            > > Moderator
            > > Trustee, Theodore Roosevelt Association
            > >
            >
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