Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Unfortunate mileage

Expand Messages
  • Bill H.
    B H I would glance at the Consumption monitor screen (but keep your eyes on the road!) and you can determine when you get the best mpg, which is to accelerate
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 1, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      B"H

      I would glance at the Consumption monitor screen (but keep your eyes
      on the road!) and you can determine when you get the best mpg, which
      is to accelerate briskly and then let off the gas a bit, going
      into "stealth" mode as long as you realistically can. I'm learning
      how to maximize my mileage that way, and driving in Brooklyn, New
      York rush hour I'm getting around 42 miles per gallon, which is
      nothing to sneeze at.

      Avoid hard acceleration; the car will respond but gas miles plummets.

      Drive conservatively and you should get decent mileage...Bill H.



      --- In toyota-prius@yahoogroups.com, "dslack42" <dslack@c...> wrote:
      > I recently drove 175 miles, on mostly freeways, and got 48.9 mpg.
      > Unfortunately, driving in my hometown, College Station, Tx, I get
      > 38.5-39 mpg with my 03 classic. My tires are at 42-40 and I
      > don't "squeal" my tires. Should I be complaining to my dealer, or
      > is it most likely my driving?
    • Dave Bassage
      Actually, trying to use stealth too much can hurt mpg. Someone on another group compared it to trying to borrow your way out of debt, as the electricity must
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 2, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Actually, trying to use stealth too much can hurt mpg. Someone on another group compared it to trying to borrow your way out of debt, as the electricity must be replaced somehow, and all of the energy used to propel the prius is ultimately derived from gas consumption.

        I was getting mid to high forties for mpg in my 2004 through the winter months, without doing much special other than increasing my tire pressures to 44 front, 42 rear, switching to synthetic oil, and driving at or below the speed limit. Then in March we saw a flurry of tips on the 2004 groups that combined with warmer temperatures allowed me to dramatically increase my mpg. My last three tanks have been at or above 60 mpg and my current tank shows 60.5 mpg at 240 miles. As I've mentioned before here, I have the advantage of a 35 mile commute, with the first 14 miles near-deserted rural roads, then a lightly travelled interstate until my final mile to work on a flat I generally run in stealth after coasting down the ramp.

        These tips have been shared before, but are worth mentioning again.

        Increase tire pressures as high as you feel comfortable, remembering to keep two pounds more pressure in the front than the rear.

        Use synthetic oil

        Avoid short trips if possible, combining several errands into one drive.

        From there it depends on how much energy you want to put into improving your mpg. The general advice to drive gently and keep your speed down is sound. Others have determined that 35 mph is the maximum mpg speed for the 2004, and at anything over 42 the ICE (internal combustion engine) must spin to avoid over-spinning one or both of the electric motors, even if you're in stealth or coasting, so there is some loss of efficiency. In most circumstances cruise control can do a better job than your foot at efficiently maintaining a constant speed, although I've notice that cruise does not do well in rolling terrain compared to driving without it. The closer you stay to 35 the better your mpg will be. And driving as slow as you feel comfortable with on the interstate also helps a lot.

        If you really want to maximize mpg, use your energy screen to achieve 'gliding' (no arrow showing on the screen at all, accomplished while coasting by a slight pressure on the accelerator) and to utilize 'deadband' acceleration (no arrows to or from battery while accelerating, accomplished by pushing the pedal a touch further than you would otherwise to accelerate, then backing off enough to make the arrows disappear or flip back and forth).

        Gliding provides significantly less resistance than coasting with your foot off the accelerator. You don't regenerate, but you can go surprisingly far with only a slight decrease in speed, and no energy consumed. Deadband acceleration means you are accelerating using the ICE at maximum efficiency. If you use the cruise control lever to accelerate the computer will usually deadband accelerate for you, which gives you a feel for the easiest range to find when you do it manually. You can also deadband more aggressively, but generally by the time you find the sweet spot you're already up to speed. Works well for hills and on-ramps, though.

        It seems counter-intuitive at first, but the highest mpg are achieved when you DON'T utilize the hybrid system, ie simply drive using the ICE at its most efficient. But it makes more sense when you recognize that although the hybrid system captures energy otherwise lost during coasting and braking, and gives it back later to supplement the ICE, there are always losses involved when you swap energy back and forth to and from the battery, so negating the need is even more efficient.

        The final aspect for the mpg dedicated is to drive in harmony with road conditions and traffic patterns. That means anticipating stops well in advance so you can coast or glide up to them, trying not to need to use your brakes any more than necessary, easing off the accelerator before reaching the tops of hills so you glide over the crests, etc.... It all adds a lot more effort to the driving experience, and perhaps more than most would consider worth the return, but it's always good to know what you COULD be doing, even if you don't choose to.

        Of course if you drive in heavy traffic most of the time, you won't have the luxury of attempting many of these techniques, and it's always important not to let yourself get so distracted by the energy screen that you compromixe driving safety, but I've been getting a real kick out of maximizing mpg.

        Hope this helps,

        Dave Bassage


        Date: Wed, 02 Jun 2004 04:32:51 -0000
        From: "Bill H." <gojoe283@...>
        Subject: Re: Unfortunate mileage

        B"H

        I would glance at the Consumption monitor screen (but keep your eyes
        on the road!) and you can determine when you get the best mpg, which
        is to accelerate briskly and then let off the gas a bit, going
        into "stealth" mode as long as you realistically can. I'm learning
        how to maximize my mileage that way, and driving in Brooklyn, New
        York rush hour I'm getting around 42 miles per gallon, which is
        nothing to sneeze at.

        Avoid hard acceleration; the car will respond but gas miles plummets.

        Drive conservatively and you should get decent mileage...Bill H.
      • Jerry Ludwig
        Yea, this is my problem. I live only 4.7 miles from work. By the time I get there (13 minutes or so), my engine Has warmed up. So I only get 40 mpg, or so
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 4, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Yea, this is my problem. I live only 4.7 miles from work. By the time
          I get there (13 minutes or so), my engine
          Has warmed up. So I only get 40 mpg, or so on average. But when I
          drive a little farther, I get very close to the
          Advertised mileage. I love my 2001 prius. I would not trade it for
          anything, well, other than a 2004 model. But for now I'm waiting for
          Hydrogren (and a Mini-Van Hybrid for my wife, I hope it's a TOY, but I'd
          be happy with any).

          Jerry

          -----Original Message-----
          From: dldorrance [mailto:dldorrance@...]
          Sent: Saturday, May 29, 2004 6:33 AM
          To: toyota-prius@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [toyota-prius] Re: Unfortunate mileage


          --- In toyota-prius@yahoogroups.com, "dslack42" <dslack@c...> wrote:
          > I recently drove 175 miles, on mostly freeways, and got 48.9 mpg.
          > Unfortunately, driving in my hometown, College Station, Tx, I get
          > 38.5-39 mpg with my 03 classic. My tires are at 42-40 and I
          > don't "squeal" my tires. Should I be complaining to my dealer, or
          > is it most likely my driving?

          Your Prius sounds fine. The reason for your lower in town mileage is
          probably due to short trips. During first 5 minutes or so of driving,
          a cold engine stays on all the time in order to create the conditions
          for super low emissions, hence using gas all the time. Mileage in
          the first 5 minutes is typically around 25 mpg. After warmup the
          engine turns on only when needed hence increasing mileage.

          Dave, "01 Prius



          To access group's website features such as Files, Photos, Links,
          Database and Polls, go to
          http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/toyota-prius
          , Photos, Links, Database and Polls, go to
          http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/toyota-prius

          Yahoo! Groups Links
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.